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#Repost @dukeglobalbaton
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DKU Master of Science in Global Health student Ginny de la Cruz meeting with the 2nd year global health students over dinner. #dkumoments #dukeglobalbaton #dukeiseverywhere #DukeMScGH #GlobalHealth
#Repost @dukeglobalbaton
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DKU #GlobalHealth student Ginny de la Cruz has the Duke global baton! She says:
Happy first day of classes from #DGHI! (courtesy of professor David Boyd)
#KeepCalm #GlobalHealth #PictureDuke #DukeGlobal #Duke360 #DukeMScGH #DukeGHMajor
To our rock-star faculty: Thank you for your guidance, patience, sense of humor, and willingness to be the bridge between our student teams and community partners. We—and our students!—are fortunate for your leadership and commitment. -Lysa MacKeen, assistant director for fieldwork operations
We're excited for another year of global health adventures with you! #dghi #globalhealth #dukeghmajor #DukeMScGH #dukeclassof2016 #dukeclassof2017 #dukeclassof2018 #dukeclassof2019
To our wonderful community partners: Thank you for mentoring our students and welcoming them into your communities. The SRT program can only succeed when we work together, and my colleagues and I are deeply grateful for the opportunity to partner with such robust community-based organizations. #globalhealth #srt2015 #dghi
#Repost @hillaryjayne23 ・・・
Just returned to Kathmandu, but I'm already missing all of the
#Repost @hillaryjayne23
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Day 3 of non-prescriber training in Sindhuli, Nepal. Participants practice rapport-building as they learn basic psychosocial counseling skills. #dghi #sindhuli #nepal #globalhealth #mhpss #summer2015
Welcome back to our terrific Tanzania team–the last SRT team to return to the States. Among their many accomplishments this summer were collecting health data on 700 schoolchildren, helping to facilitate a parents’ meeting with >400 adult attendees, assisting with antenatal and child medical check-ups, and working with the Mtoto (Child) Africa campaign to provide vitamin A supplements and deworming medication to all children under 5.
Welcome back to our fabulous Ghana team, pictured here with one of the many people they met this summer. Having travelled to 8 of the 10 regions in Ghana to survey nurse anesthetist students across the country, they win the prize for the most miles traversed by an SRT team this summer! The Ghana team commented repeatedly about how inspired they were by the students’ passion to provide care in their rural, under-resourced community hospitals.
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More updates from our SRT teams can be found at srt2015.tumblr.com
New post from our Ghana SRT team: It’s been an incredible “2 months” here in Ghana! We are headed back home tomorrow after visiting numerous hospitals throughout the country and meeting countless incredible, selfless people who are doing so much for the health of their communities, both the students and others. We had to travel a lot to see all of the students (we visited 8 of the 10 regions here) but we managed to come out successful and have some fun along the way. We still have work to do back home, but at least it will be done with many fond memories and strong friendships that were made here. It’s Ghana by so fast!
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Check out more updates from all our SRT teams at srt2015.tumblr.com!
Today is #WorldHepatitisDay ... Did you know that the Hep C virus is 10x more infectious than #HIV? Visit our website to learn about our hepatitis research in the U.S. and beyond: globalhealth.duke.edu (search

globalhealth.duke.edu

We're thrilled to welcome back our returning global health students and scholars and looking forward to teaching and learning with a whole new slew of global health majors, minors, master's degree students, and scholars!

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Our $20M grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation helped pave the way for a record year of fundraising at Duke. Many thanks to Gates, Duke Forward, and our very own development director, Josh Bond, for making the grant a reality! Learn more about the Gates grant: http://bit.ly/1dYx6es

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Shout-out to our Student Research Training program community partner in Uganda—the Naama Millenium Preparatory School! The school is located in the village of Naama, Mityana District in Uganda for children ages 5 to 18, many of whom are orphans. This summer, our students worked with staff at the school to conduct community health assessments, organize a community health fair and evaluate a community-based counseling program focused on supporting and empowering the local youth. Learn more...

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globalhealth.duke.edu

#TBT: Around this time last year, the Ebola outbreak was heating up. In recognition of this difficult time and the progress in the fight against Ebola since then, we're sharing this article from last August about how Duke reached out to Liberia and Sierra Leone with surplus supplies through the Duke REMEDY program. Read the story and learn more about REMEDY!

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sph.unc.edu

This just in! Researchers from DGHI and the Center for Health Policy and Inequalities Research, including DGHI's Kate Whetten, concluded that institutions are as safe as family care for orphans. The article, published in Global Health: Science and Practice, is part of a larger study, Positive Outcomes for Orphans (POFO).

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Shout-out to our Student Research Training program community partner in Tanzania—Primary Healthcare Ambassadors Foundation! This summer, the student team conducted school-based screenings to collect baseline health data, gave community seminars on health topics, documented ongoing NGO activities, and participated in basic clinic activities.

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Training Tomorrow's Global Health Leaders: Senior Voices 2014
Global Mental Health at Duke
Finding Your Niche at Duke
DGHI Research Series: Road traffic injuries
Connecting Students With Research, Their Communities & The World
New Course: Primate Disease Ecology and Global Health
Engineering Solutions for Global Health
The Voices of Global Health Showcase
Studying Global Health in the Peruvian Amazon:  A Bass Connections Project
Introducing 2013-14 Doris Duke Fellows at Duke University