Courses

Title Number Instructor Level Semester Requirements Fulfilled
African Health Systems, NGOs, and GH

Explores complex institutional environment of African health systems, emphasizing NGOs. Weaves together: (1) social, political, economic context of Africa; (2) origins/current condition of African health systems; (3) evolution of NGOs in these systems, and in global health and international development; (4) transitions in global health governance from WHO in the 1940s to complex actors of today; (5) role of primary health care in global health, from 1978 Alma Ata Declaration to primary healthcare packages in country plans. Topics pursued in historical and contemporary terms through team projects, case studies focused on health systems and institutional actors in representative countries.

GLHLTH 671
Toole, David UG/GRAD FALL 2014 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Aids and Other Emerging Diseases

Explores the interaction of biology and culture in creating and defining diseases through an investigation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and other emerging diseases: molecular biology; biology of transmission and infection; the role of people and culture in the evolution of infectious diseases; reasons for the geographic variations in disease. The inductive-deductive methodology of science is both used to develop and test hypotheses as well as examined itself as an analytical tool. Intended for nonmajors.

BIOLOGY 154
Was: BIOLOGY 46
Broverman, Sherryl UG Only SPRING 2014 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Natural Science
Air Pollution: From Sources to Health Effects

nBoth urban outdoor air pollution and household indoor air pollution contribute significantly to global burden of disease. Course covers fundamentals about how major air pollutants are generated and transported in the atmosphere and how these pollutants affect human health. Relevant exposure assessment, toxicology and epidemiology case studies are discussed. Prerequisites: general chemistry; introductory-level statistics.

ENVIRON 642
Zhang, Jim UG/GRAD SPRING 2014 MSC: Elective
Air Quality Management

Types, sources, effects of air pollutants. Regulatory framework emphasizing the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and federal, state, local agency implementation. Application of risk assessment, technology, market incentives to air management. Scientific, policy aspects of acid deposition, global climate change, indoor air, mobile sources control. Dispersion modeling, exposure assessment. Instructor: Vandenberg. 3 units.

ENVIRON 535
Was: ENVIRON 235
Vandenberg, John UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
Anthropology and Global Health
Crosslisted as CULANTH 218S

Investigates connections between anthropology and global health. Readings based on ethnographic research conducted globally. Topics include cross-cultural experiences of epidemics, ethical implications of globalizing clinical trials, moral and political dimensions of health and humanitarian interventions, connections between nationalism and population policy, overlaps between traditional healing systems and public health programs, how gender ideologies shape reproductive health, and questions of identity, power, and ethics amidst global rollout of HIV therapies.

GLHLTH 220S
Was: GLHLTH
Solomon, Harris UG Only FALL 2014 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Anthropology and Global Health
Crosslisted as CULANTH 218S

Investigates connections between anthropology and global health. Readings based on ethnographic research conducted globally. Topics include cross-cultural experiences of epidemics, ethical implications of globalizing clinical trials, moral and political dimensions of health and humanitarian interventions, connections between nationalism and population policy, overlaps between traditional healing systems and public health programs, how gender ideologies shape reproductive health, and questions of identity, power, and ethics amidst global rollout of HIV therapies. Investigates connections between anthropology and global health. Readings based on ethnographic research conducted globally. Topics include cross-cultural experiences of epidemics, ethical implications of globalizing clinical trials, moral and political dimensions of health and humanitarian interventions, connections between nationalism and population policy, overlaps between traditional healing systems and public health programs, how gender ideologies shape reproductive health, and questions of identity, power, and ethics amidst global rollout of HIV therapies.

GLHLTH 220S
Was: GLHLTH
Solomon, Harris UG Only SPRING 2014 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Anthropology and Psychology

This course explores some of the different ways in which anthropology has intersected with psychology. It begins with a survey of the way anthropologists have borrowed psychological idioms/theories in their research, and then shifts to more recent work in which anthropologists have approached psychologists, and the mental health fields more broadly, as subjects for ethnographic research. Topics covered include: studies of %u201Cculture and personality,%u201D anthropologies of emotion and affect, trans-cultural psychiatry, the political-economy of psychological services, global mental health, and the expansion of pharmaceutical living.

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC ELECTIVE. Counts as Elective only if taken prior to Fall 2009.
CULANTH 227
Was: CULANTH 249S
Matza, Tomas UG Only SPRING 2014 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Clinical Research Methodology - Summer 1 2014 GLHLTH 390S
Chu, Vivien UG Only Summer 1 2014 MAJOR: Core – Research
MINOR: Elective
Comparative Health Care Systems

The interaction of historical, political, economic, cultural, legal/ethical, and sociological factors in the organization and operation of health care systems. Emphasis on how cultural values penetrate the social institutions (politics, economics) that determine health care policies and their reception by societal members. Effects of social and technological change on health care systems, comparing their effects across societies with differing histories, cultural values, and economic systems. Major focus on United States, England, Sweden, and other Western societies.

PUBPOL 590S
Was: PUBPOL 178
Taylor, Donald UG/GRAD SPRING 2014 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Policy
Displacement and Global Health

A discussion of the health consequences of global displacement, including nutrition, mental health and lifestyle diseases, with a focus on social/community impacts and policy solutions. Particular attention will be paid to the ethics of asylum and the extent to which refugees are actually afforded the physical and mental health protection and support they need.

ETHICS 390S
El-Shaarawi, Nadia UG Only SPRING 2014 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Economic Analysis for Environment and Public Health
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 607 ENVIRON 563

Course considers the importance of economic analysis, or cost-benefit analysis (CBA), for public policy assessments. Specific focus is on health and environmental policy, and the steps in identification / cataloguing, quantification, and monetization of impacts of potential policies and projects. Covers: Economic rationale for CBA; Basic principles for assessing the economic effects of projects; Techniques for valuing health and environmental impacts; Intergenerational/philosophical concerns related to CBA; Social discounting; Risk and uncertainty; Comparisons of CBA with other approaches (i.e. cost effectiveness analysis, multi-objective analysis).

GLHLTH 531
Was: GLHLTH 224
Jeuland, Marc UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Economic Growth and Development Policy

Basic principles and policy issues in the study of economic growth and development. The roles of physical, natural and human capital, technological innovation, productivity improvements and institutions in explaining patterns andncauses of variations in growth and development performance of countries. Effects on growth and development of many current policy issues including HIV-AIDs, financial crises, foreign aid and investment, debt burdens and forgiveness, corruption and governance. Prerequisite: Public Policy Studies 302.

PUBPOL 598
Fernholz, Fernando UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
Environmental Toxicology

Study of environmental contaminants from a broad perspective encompassing biochemical, ecological, and toxicological principles and methodologies. Discussion of sources, environmental transport and transformation phenomena, accumulation in biota and ecosystems. Impacts at various levels of organization, particularly biochemical and physiological effects. Prerequisites: organic chemistry and vertebrate physiology or consent of instructor. Instructor: Di Giulio. 3 units.

ENVIRON 501
Was: ENVIRON 212
Meyer, Joel UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
Ethics For Global Health Research

This course will present an overview of practical and theoretical approaches to bioethics from a range of perspectives, including the humanities, law, philosophy, medicine and science. Students will apply various resources, terminology and frameworks to case studies which will prepare them for their own research. The course will include IRB and responsible conduct of research. (2 credits)

GLHLTH 740
Was: GLHLTH 330
Stewart, Kearsley GRAD Only SPRING 2014 MSC: Core
Ethics in Clinical Research - Summer 1 2014 GLHLTH 390S
Chu, Vivien UG Only Summer 1 2014 MAJOR: Core – Ethics
MINOR: Ethics
Ethics of Infectious Disease

Examination of the role of ethical decision-making when controlling infectious disease epidemics. Applies classic public health ethics of balancing individual liberty vs. public good to the new global health context of emerging infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, Ebola, and SARS, plus re-emerging infectious diseases such as multidrug-resistant TB, polio, and cholera. Explores questions of resource allocation, mandatory or voluntary prevention measures, and ethical obligations of health care workers vs. responsibilities of individuals in the context of new global public health. Prior global health coursework recommended.

GLHLTH 341
Stewart, Kearsley UG Only FALL 2014 GHC: Ethics
MAJOR: Core – Ethics
MINOR: Ethics
Food, Farming and Feminism
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 225

No course description available

Course Notes
Viewing "agriculture," "nature," and "consumption" as pressing feminist themes and exploration of various dimensions of the cultural and political ecology/economy of producing, processing, circulating, preparing, and consuming sustenance. Particular focus on the ethical impact of US policy on rural farm communities and developing nations.
WOMENST 275
Rosenberg, Gabriel UG Only FALL 2014 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Fundamentals of Global Health

Introduction to global health issues and challenges. Develop an understanding of key concepts, tools, and frameworks essential for continued study in global health. Focus on global disease burden, health determinants and disparities, health policy and actors, and challenges of global health interventions. Explore the importance of understanding and addressing global health through multidisciplinary frameworks of the natural sciences, social-behavioral sciences, humanities, and policy. Consists of lecture and learning labs, intensive small group discussion, and global health case analyses. Intended for undergraduates.

GLHLTH 101
Boyd, David UG Only FALL 2014 GHC: Intro
MAJOR: Core – Fundamentals
MINOR: Fundamentals
Fundamentals of Global Health

Introduction to global health issues and challenges. Develop an understanding of key concepts, tools, and frameworks essential for continued study in global health. Focus on global disease burden, health determinants and disparities, health policy and actors, and challenges of global health interventions. Explore the importance of understanding and addressing global health through multidisciplinary frameworks of the natural sciences, social-behavioral sciences, humanities, and policy. Consists of lecture and learning labs, intensive small group discussion, and global health case analyses. Intended for undergraduates. nDescriptionnIntroduction to global health issues and challenges. Develop an understanding of key concepts, tools, and frameworks essential for continued study in global health. Focus on global disease burden, health determinants and disparities, health policy and actors, and challenges of global health interventions. Explore the importance of understanding and addressing global health through multidisciplinary frameworks of the natural sciences, social-behavioral sciences, humanities, and policy. Consists of lecture and learning labs, intensive small group discussion, and global health case analyses. Intended for undergraduates.

GLHLTH 101
Boyd, David UG Only SPRING 2014 GHC: Intro
MAJOR: Core – Fundamentals
MINOR: Fundamentals
Gender, Poverty, and Health
Crosslisted as SOCIOL 212

See GLHLTH 212 Examines interconnections among gender, poverty, and health. Adopts global perspective with focus on resource poor countries. Discusses frameworks for understanding health as well as in depth case studies of particular health areas.

SOCIOL 212
Was: SOCIOL 112
Watt, Melissa UG Only SPRING 2014 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Social Determinants
Genomic Perspectives on Human Evolution

Human evolutionary history as studied from the perspective of the genome. Nature of contemporary genomic data and how they are interpreted in the context of the fossil record, comparative anatomy, psychology, and cultural studies. Examination of both the origin of modern humans as a distinct species and subsequent migration across the world. Emphasis on language, behavior, and disease susceptibility as traits of particular evolutionary interest. Prerequisite: Biology 118 or equivalent course. Instructor: Wray

BIOLOGY 554
Was: BIOLOGY 274-01
Wray, Gregory UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
Global Displacement: Voix Francophones
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 325S

Builds advanced language skills in context of migration and resettlement issues focused on Central and West African Francophone refugees in North America. Examine current laws, processes, practices, reasons for seeking refugee status, integration into host countries, challenges of cultural orientation. Discuss questions of testimony or narrative, including ethical considerations, with close attention to politics of listening to and speaking for other communities. Texts include UNHCR documents, documentary films, interviews, literary narratives. Community-based component (20 hours) engages students with refugee community in Durham. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent.

FRENCH 325S
Reisinger, Deborah UG Only FALL 2014 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Environmental Health: Economics and Policy
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 538

Social science perspective on global environmental health. Students will learn to identify primary environmental causes of high burden diseases such as malaria, diarrhea, and respiratory infections; describe how to measure socio-economic impacts of global environmental health diseases; discuss key policies to control global environmental health problems based on private prevention and therapeutic behaviors; and propose frameworks to empirically monitor and evaluate global environmental health policies. A sub-module will focus on climate change and water-borne diseases. Prerequisites: Intro course in statistics.

ENVIRON 538
Was: ENVIRON 238
Jeuland, Marc UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
Global Health and Development

Explore different perspectives on what "works" in global health and development. Study the Millennium Villages Project and, more broadly, the notion that what the world needs is a "big push" for global health and development. Learn about how interventions and policies are evaluated and take stock of the evidence for different approaches. Grapple with the idea of cost-effectiveness and consider whether the needle is moving in the right direction, if at all. Intended for undergraduate students in the Focus Program, Global Health Cluster.

GLHLTH 175FS
Green, Eric UG Only FALL 2014 MAJOR: Focused Study
Global Health and Genomics

Explores the origins of, and current developments in global genomics research. Examples of genomics research and its applications with global health from medicine, agriculture, and environmental sciences. Students will gain familiarity with underlying science, critically analyze ethical, legal and social issues that arise in conduct of genomic research and policies surrounding design and conduct of genomic research, especially in developing countries and with indigenous peoples. Explore how design of genomic research and its commercialization affect access to products and services in the context of global health disparity. Familiarity with basic concepts of genetics and genomics preferred.

GENOME 508S
Chandrasekharan, Subhashini UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MSC: Elective
Global Health and Human Rights - Summer 2 2014
Crosslisted as CULANTH 290S
GLHLTH 390S
Cross, Jason UG Only Summer 2 2014 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Health Capstone

Capstone Course for students in Global Health Certificate. Group analysis of a current global health problem/issue. Project involves background research, data acquisition, analysis, writing, and presentation of a substantial research paper/report at an advanced level. Consent of instructor required.

Course Notes
Course number was GLHLTH 255S prior to spring 2010. Course is no longer offered as a seminar.
GLHLTH 501
Was: GLHLTH 255
Boyd, David UG/GRAD SPRING 2014 GHC: Capstone
MAJOR: Senior Seminar
Global Health Challenges

Course introduces major global health problems and social, behavioral, economic, biomedical and environmental determinants of health in resource limited settings. Topics include communicable diseases i.e. HIV, malaria, tuberculosis and common childhood diseases; chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and mental health; and determinants of health associated with these diseases, such as poverty, gender imbalance, culture, poor environmental sanitation, malnutrition, tobacco use, and climate change. Other topics may include health promotion, reproductive health, maternal and child health, and disaster preparedness.

GLHLTH 701
Was: GLHLTH 310
Woods, Chris GRAD Only FALL 2014 MSC: Core
Global Health Doctoral Certificate Seminar

This seminar is required for the Global Health Doctoral Certificate. Its contents will vary by semester but may include a combination of journal club, discussions with experts at Duke or external visitors, research presentations, and dissertation discussions.

GLHLTH 870S
Sikkema, Kathleen GRAD Only FALL 2014 PhD: Elective
Global Health Ethics
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 210
PUBPOL 330
Was: PUBPOL 155
Whetten, Kathryn UG Only FALL 2014 GHC: Ethics
GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Ethics
MAJOR: Core – Ethics
Global Health Law & Technology - Summer 1 2014
Crosslisted as ECON 390S
GLHLTH 390S
Cross, Jason UG Only Summer 1 2014 MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
Global Health Research: Design and Practice

Course provides a foundation in study design, research question development, field implementation, measurement, validity and reliability. Quantitative and qualitative research approaches are examined. Students build critical skills in reading, interpreting and synthesizing scientific literature. The selection of appropriate measurements and survey development is emphasized and issues in field implementation explored.

GLHLTH 702
Was: GLHLTH 321
Sullivan, Kristen GRAD Only FALL 2014 MSC: Core
Global Health Research: Qualitative Field Methods

Course builds on material from GLHLTH702, but narrows focus to (1) qualitative field methods and 2) theories of the mixed method approach. A field-based, applied course designed to help students choose the qualitative field methods that best fit their project. Students will develop basic qualitative skills practiced by social sciences: ethnographic description, participant observation, interviewing. In addition, the course will introduce time allocation diaries and fieldnotes. Will discuss methods for collecting, analyzing, integrating, and reporting data from multiple sources. Finally, we will engage in ethical analysis as a core theme that unifies all stages of research

GLHLTH 772
Stewart, Kearsley GRAD Only SPRING 2014 MSC: Core
Global Health Research: Quantitative Methods II

Modular course building on Quantitative Methods I. Required module provides common understanding of regression including linear, logistic, and general linear regression, use and interpretation of dichotomous and continuous variables, indicator terms, and interaction terms, and regression diagnostics. nModular course building on Quantitative Methods I. Required module provides common understanding of regression including linear, logistic, and general linear regression, use and interpretation of dichotomous and continuous variables, indicator terms, and interaction terms, and regression diagnostics.

GLHLTH 707
Park, Lawrence GRAD Only SPRING 2014 MSC: Core
Global Health Service, Research, & Ethics

Introduces ethical and human rights concepts in GH and current issues in health ethics. Explores how to understand and engage in ethical health service, intervention, research and education. Requires students analyze and critique the ethical choices of individuals, policy-makers and health workers. Engages in service activities during the course, students improve understanding of how an intellectual approach to ethics can be enhanced as well as counteracted by emotional impact that service often offers. Explores standards of care, access to care, best outcomes vs. distributed justice. Focuses on ethics related to Infectious Diseases; Obesity, Alcohol & Tobacco; and Environ Health. ntroduces ethical and human rights concepts in Global Health and current issues in health ethics. Explores how to understand and engage in ethical health service, intervention, research and education. Requires students analyze and critique ethical choices of individuals, policy-makers and health workers. Engaging in service activities, students improve understanding of how an intellectual approach to ethics can be enhanced as well as counteracted by emotional impact. Explores standards of care, access to care, best outcomes vs. distributed justice. Focuses on ethics related to infectious diseases; obesity, alcohol & tobacco; and environmental health.

GLHLTH 373S
Ariely, Sumedha UG Only SPRING 2014 GHC: Ethics
GHC: Elective
MINOR: Ethics
MAJOR: Core – Ethics
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Health Supply and Organization

The course will begin with an overview of the methods of cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-benefit analysis with specific examples to illustrate how these methodologies have been used to assess specific technologies as well as barriers to their use, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. We then will focus on particular sectors%u2014starting with pharmaceuticals and vaccines followed by inpatient hospital care and ambulatory (outpatient) care. We will then devote an entire section of the course to quality of care, focusing on how it can and has been measured. After students have gained some familiarity with the parts of the health system, we will examine the attractiveness of various models of financing and provision, ranging from private sector financing and provision, mixed private sector and public financing and provision, and a fully public program of financing and provision.

GLHLTH 690-02
Sloan, Frank UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
Global Health Systems and Policy

Introduces global health systems and policy in four modules: 1.Globalization; 2. Health; 3. Systems; 4. Policy. Draws on faculty from a range of disciplines, including anthropology, biology, economics, history, medicine, political science, and sociology, to situate the concept and practice of "global health" within these four broad themes. Provides an understanding of variations in health systems around the world and of current issues in global health policy, including the political economies of health care, decision-making processes, governance structures, and the resource-constrained realities of global health policy-making.

GLHLTH 303
Toole, David UG Only FALL 2014 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Policy
MINOR: Elective
Global Humanitarianism

In this course we will explore humanitarianism as both a global phenomenon and a western model for engaging with the world. The class will examine the cultural and political conditions that make it possible for some people to be saviors and others to require saving. It will frame this ethical question through a study of the role of states, NGOs, aid agencies, corporations and technologies in humanitarian work. We will focus on the intersections between development and humanitarianism and how humanitarian interventions are increasingly as much about alleviating poverty and supporting political change, as about responding to crises caused by health epidemics, conflict or war, and environmental disasters. We will pay close attention to the impacts of humanitarian interventions both good and bad, while critically exploring how local agendas and conditions shape and respond to these programs. Our work will move through the evaluation of the impact of humanitarian projects to consider the role of humanitarianism as a global phenomenon that affects both what it means to be American and how the %u2018other%u2019 is constructed. The class will also explore how humanitarianism has become a pop cultural phenomenon. What does it mean that participation in aid programs has never been easier for Americans, Canadians and Western Europeans, who can help the world just by shopping? These questions will be examined as much as possible through ethnographies of aid around the world as well as through film, television and fictional encounters between Americans and the people they are trying to help. Our objectives will be to construct a set of collective questions and tools that enable us to better put humanitarianism, development and globalization in question anthropologically and to create an intellectual community in which we encourage and collaborate on one another%u2019s intellectual projects.

CULANTH 290
Mathers, Catherine UG Only FALL 2014 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Mental Health
Crosslisted as CULANTH 611S PSY 611S
GLHLTH 660
Was: GLHLTH 223S
Kohrt, Brandon UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
Global Nutrition: Over and Under Nutrition in Developing Countries

Discusses the nutrition problems of developing countries. Reviews epidemiological, biological, and behavioral consequences of both overnutrition (e.g., obesity) and undernutrition (e.g., malnutrition). Emphasizes infectious disease (HIV, TB, malaria, diarrhea) of children and perinatal outcomes (e.g., fetal loss, low birth weight, HIV transmission, pre-eclampsia) of women and children. Strong focus on ethical and political issues relevant to the formulation of nutrition policy and programs in developing countries. Course is designed for graduate students or advanced undergraduates. nNutrition problems of developing countries. Epidemiological, biological, behavioral consequences of both overnutrition (obesity) and undernutrition (malnutrition). Emphasizes physiology of infectious disease (HIV, TB, malaria, diarrhea) of children and perinatal health outcomes (fetal loss, low birth weight, HIV transmission, pre-eclampsia) of women and children. Basic principles of nutrition, physical manifestation of nutritional deficiency, and anthropometric assessment (body composition). Strong focus on ethical and political issues relevant to formulation of nutrition policy and programs in developing countries. For graduate students or advanced undergraduates. Service learning course.

GLHLTH 670S
Was: GLHLTH 220S - 01
Benjamin Neelon, Sara UG/GRAD SPRING 2014 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Globalization and Governance

Seminar explores economic, political, and social aspects of globalization and their implications for public policy making in the twenty-first century. Focus on issues of governance, particularly international cooperation, the design of international organizations, and the role of international NGOs. Policy areas include international trade and finance, environment, security, human rights, media and communications, and international development.

PUBPOL 820
Was: PUBPOL 320
Jentleson, Bruce GRAD Only FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Provides the student the opportunity to incorporate health promotion and disease prevention assessment and intervention into the health of clients across the life span. Applying the principles of health education, the course prepares students to use the tools and skills necessary to provide health promotion and disease
prevention services to individuals, families, groups, and communities. The definition of health and the factors that impact an individual's or group's health framework is the basis for understanding health maintenance interventions. 3 credits.

NURSING 502
Was: NURSING 502
Staff UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
Health Systems in Developing Countries

This course introduces students to key challenges faced in strengthening of health systems in low and middle income countries. The course will cover a diverse set of topics including an overview of organization of health systems, models of purchasing and providing health care, innovations in financing health care, and issues in service delivery such as quality of care and human resource challenges. Students will learn frameworks and methods employed in the evaluation of health systems. The course will also draw attention to resource allocation problems and various frameworks used to address them. The course will primarily rely on readings from a variety of health policy, economics and other social science journals. Course introduces key challenges faced in strengthening of health systems in low and middle income countries. Topics include: overview of organization of health systems, models of purchasing and providing health care, innovations in financing health care, issues in service delivery such as quality of care and human resource challenges, and frameworks and methods employed in the evaluation of health systems. Course will also draw attention to resource allocation problems and various frameworks used to address them. Readings primarily from health policy, economics and other social science journals. Consent of instructor required.

GLHLTH 750
Was: GLHLTH 340
Schulman, Kevin Pate, Muhammad GRAD Only SPRING 2014 MSC: Core
Human Health in Evolutionary Perspective
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 304D

No course description available

EVANTH 285
Nunn, Charles UG Only FALL 2014 MAJOR: Foundations – Natural Science
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
Implementation Research and Health

Implementation Research/Operational Research (IR/OR) studies how to improve uptake, implementation, and translation of research findings into routine and common practices ('know-do' or 'evidence to program' gap); moves results from effectiveness studies and efficacy trials to real-world settings, obtaining information to guide scale-up; helps implementers apply lessons from a program in one context to developing a similar program in a similar environment. Course covers: framework of IR/OR; methods of identifying program implementation problems; how to organize and develop an IR/OR proposal; main study design, research methods, data collection and analysis used in IR/OR; approaches to capacity building for IR/OR in developing countries. IR/OR: studies how to improve uptake, implementation, and translation of research findings into routine and common practices ('know-do' or 'evidence to program' gap); moves results from effectiveness studies and efficacy trials to real-world settings, obtaining information to guide scale-up; helps implementers apply lessons from a program in one context to developing a similar program in a similar environment. Course covers: framework of IR/OR; methods of identifying program implementation problems; how to organize and develop an IR/OR proposal; main study design, research methods, data collection and analysis used in IR/OR; approaches to capacity building for IR/OR in developing countries.

GLHLTH 751
Was: GLHLTH 350
Tang, Shenglan GRAD Only SPRING 2014 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Intro to mHealth GLHLTH 590S
Staff UG/GRAD SPRING 2014 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MSC: Elective
Introduction to Economics for Global Health

Economics is the study of making choices under resource constraints. This course is a primer on basic principles in economics that introduces a wide range of topics pertinent to issues in the healthcare and development sectors including preferences & utility, consumer demand, elasticity, income & substitution effects, choice under uncertainty, the economics of information (moral hazard, adverse selection), basics of theory of the firm, perfect competition, monopoly, and market failures. We will also discuss topics central to economics of health such as economics of insurance and models of provider behavior. Course is targeted to MSc-GH student who have no prior introduction to economics. Economics is the study of making choices under resource constraints. This course is a primer on basic principles in economics that introduces a wide range of topics pertinent to issues in the healthcare and development sectors including preferences & utility, consumer demand, elasticity, income & substitution effects, choice under uncertainty, the economics of information (moral hazard, adverse selection), basics of theory of the firm, perfect competition, monopoly, and market failures. We will also discuss topics central to economics of health such as economics of insurance and models of provider behavior. Course is targeted to MSc-GH student who have no prior introduction to economics.

GLHLTH 752
Mohanan, Manoj GRAD Only SPRING 2014 MSC: Elective
Introduction to Epidemiology: Focus on Global Health

Introduces students to the main concepts and methods used in population-based epidemiology research. Topics covered include measures of disease frequency, study design, measures of association, and problems of bias, especially as they pertain to global health research. Students will learn to understand and evaluate epidemiological studies. A prior quantitative course is highly recommended. Introduction to main concepts and methods used in population-based epidemiology research. Topics include measures of disease frequency, study design, measures of association, and problems of bias, especially as they pertain to global health research. Students will learn to understand and evaluate epidemiological studies. A prior quantitative course highly recommended.

GLHLTH 362
Was: GLHLTH 161
Maselko, Joanna UG Only SPRING 2014 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Introduction to Maternal and Child Health

Provides solid foundation in global perspectives on maternal and child health research, practice, and policy. Utilize case analysis to examine critical health challenges facing women, children, providers, and policymakers in some of the world's most vulnerable communities. Course designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students.

GLHLTH 571
Green, Eric UG/GRAD FALL 2014 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Introduction to Maternal and Child Health

Provides solid foundation in global perspectives on maternal and child health research, practice, and policy. Utilize case analysis to examine critical health challenges facing women, children, providers, and policymakers in some of the world's most vulnerable communities. Course designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students. nProvides solid foundation in global perspectives on maternal and child health research, practice, and policy. Utilize case analysis to examine critical health challenges facing women, children, providers, and policymakers in some of the world¿s most vulnerable communities. Course designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students.

GLHLTH 571
Green, Eric UG/GRAD SPRING 2014 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Introduction to Quantitative Methods for Program Evaluation

Course covers tools and techniques of program evaluation, and help students become familiar with key research methods employed to evaluate the effect of policies and programs. Teach students to critically read empirical research. Focus on quantitative impact evaluation, including experimental and quasi-experimental methods. Research designs will include: Difference in difference methods, Matching methods, Regression discontinuity designs, Instrumental variables, and randomized controlled experiments. Students learn to assess validity and limits of information presented to them. Prerequisite: GLHLTH 707 (Quant Methods II) or equivalent course that covers one semester of statistics. Course covers tools and techniques of program evaluation, and help students become familiar with key research methods employed to evaluate the effect of policies and programs. Teach students to critically read empirical research. Focus on quantitative impact evaluation, including experimental and quasi-experimental methods. Research designs will include: Difference in difference methods, Matching methods, Regression discontinuity designs, Instrumental variables, and randomized controlled experiments. Students learn to assess validity and limits of information presented to them. Prerequisite: GLHLTH 707 (Quant Methods II) or equivalent course that covers one semester of statistics.

GLHLTH 709
Mohanan, Manoj GRAD Only SPRING 2014 MSC: Core
Introduction to US Health Care System PUBPOL 165
Ubel, Peter UG Only SPRING 2014 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MAJOR: Foundations – Policy
MINOR: Elective
Medical Anthropology
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 321T

Cross cultural experiences and understanding of health and illness, the body and non-biological aspects of medicine. Culture-specific sickness (like envidia, running amok, attention deficit disorder). Class, race, and gender inflected experiences of health. Various societies' organization of health care specialists, including biomedical doctors, voudon priestesses, and shamans.

CULANTH 424T
Was: CULANTH 191U/T
Solomon, Harris UG Only FALL 2014 GHC: Ethics
GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MAJOR: Foundations – Humanities
Medical Anthropology
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 321T

Cross cultural experiences and understanding of health and illness, the body and non-biological aspects of medicine. Culture-specific sickness (like envidia, running amok, attention deficit disorder). Class, race, and gender inflected experiences of health. Various societies' organization of health care specialists, including biomedical doctors, voudon priestesses, and shamans.

CULANTH 424T
Was: CULANTH 191U/T
Solomon, Harris UG Only SPRING 2014 GHC: Ethics
GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MAJOR: Foundations – Humanities
Narratives of Living with HIV/AIDS

How do we learn about the global experience of people living with HIV/AIDS? Read biographies, narratives, poetry, and blogs written by HIV persons, their families, friends, doctors, and caregivers. Listen to stories told in film documentaries and on the internet. Study interdisciplinary theories of identity and sexuality, illness narratives, narrative medicine, and doctor-patient communication. Reflect on the different meanings of the AIDS experience for men and women, young and old, in Brazil, Botswana, China, Haiti, Russia, South Africa, and rural and urban USA. Apply this new framework to investigate and analyze HIV/AIDS programs. Prior global health coursework recommended.

GLHLTH 302
Stewart, Kearsley UG Only FALL 2014 MAJOR: Foundations – Humanities
GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
Non-Communicable Diseases

Course will provide an overview of the recent (mid-20th century to the present) trends in non-communicable disease epidemiology. Focus on four major non-communicable disease categories as separate modules: cardiovascular, oncologic, diabetic and pulmonary diseases. Case studies used to highlight selected geographic differences. By using lectures, assigned readings and classroom discussion the course aims to provide the student with a firm understanding of the shifting disease burden and the landscape of stakeholders and interventions to prevent the same.

GLHLTH 641
Bloomfield, Gerald UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
One Health: From Philosophy to Practice

Interdisciplinary course introducing construct of One Health as increasingly important to a holistic understanding of prevention of disease and maintenance of health. Includes discussion of bidirectional impact of animal health on human health, impact of earth’s changing ecology on health. Learning objectives include 1) to describe how different disciplines contribute to the practice of One Health, 2) to creatively design interdisciplinary interventions to improve Global Health using a One Health model. Course will include weekly 2-hour multi-campus seminar off-site at NC Biotechnology Center with on-campus discussion section using case studies to supplement the seminar.
Interdisciplinary course introducing construct of One Health as increasingly important to a holistic understanding of prevention of disease and maintenance of health. Includes discussion of bidirectional impact of animal health on human health, impact of earth¿s changing ecology on health. Learning objectives include 1) to describe how different disciplines contribute to the practice of One Health, 2) to creatively design interdisciplinary interventions to improve Global Health using a One Health model. Course will include weekly 2-hour multi-campus seminar off-site at NC Biotechnology Center with on-campus discussion section using case studies to supplement the seminar.

GLHLTH 771
Was: GLHLTH 371
Woods, Chris Pan, William GRAD Only SPRING 2014 MSC: Elective
Politics of International Aid in Low-Income Countries

The effectiveness of aid in low-income countries has been the subject of intense debate.The course will examine the context and objectives of international aid, the record and lessons, and recent efforts and proposals for change within the international community. There is a special (but not exclusive) focus on Africa, since more robust growth and poverty reduction on that continent are at the center of the aidneffectiveness debate. In this exploration of the politics of aid, attention will be focused on the principal stakeholders, their motivations, and the quality of interaction among the various players (Governments, NGOs, bilateral donors, and multilateral institutions), along with the bottom line whether aid is resulting in poverty reduction in low income countries. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with recent literature on the topic, key debates surrounding aid effectiveness, the policies and actions of different donors, and recent proposals and measures aimed at improving development assistance. The course is primarily a group discussion, with occasional mini-lectures, student presentations, debates, case studies, two papers, and a final simulation.

PUBPOL 724
Was: PUBPOL 383E.01
Pomerantz, Phyllis GRAD Only FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
Population and Environmental Dynamics and Human Health
Crosslisted as ENVIRON 637S

Course examines population, health and environment (PHE) dynamics with focus on interactions in developing or transition economies. Theoretical and empirical approaches governing PHE dynamics from multidisciplinary perspectives, including geography, public health/epidemiology, demography, and economics. Students will obtain experience in design and analysis of PHE studies, and epidemiology of vector-born, chronic and enteric infections. nnCourse examines population, health and environment (PHE) dynamics with focus on interactions in developing or transition economies. Theoretical and empirical approaches governing PHE dynamics from multidisciplinary perspectives, including geography, public health /epidemiology, demography, and economics. Students will obtain experience in design and analysis of PHE studies, and epidemiology of vector-born, chronic and enteric infections.

GLHLTH 637S
Was: GLHLTH 237S
Pan, William UG/GRAD SPRING 2014 MSC: Elective
Primate Disease Ecology and Global Health

Covers concepts of disease ecology, with specific application to primates, human evolution, and global health. Explores the epidemiology and evolution of infectious diseases through the primary literature, focusing on infectious diseases of wild primates, humans, and other mammals. Students learn about the diversity of infectious diseases found in humans, and the basics of epidemiology, disease evolution and emergence, and primate behavioral ecology. Students also gain experience in thinking critically about scientific research, identifying interesting research questions, and communicating science to others. Prerequisite: EVANTH 101/101D or Introductory-level biology.

EVANTH 385D
Nunn, Charles UG Only SPRING 2014 MAJOR: Foundations – Natural Science
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Quantitative Method I

Course introduces principles of epidemiology, including disease frequency measures; measures of association; observational, experimental, and quasi-experimental study designs; validity -- confounding, selection bias, measurement error; reliability. Course interweaves introductory biostatistics for continuous and categorical variables. Course has a data analysis lab section in which students walk through a guided data analysis on a provided data set, such as Demographic and Health Surveys.

GLHLTH 705
Was: GLHLTH 320
Turner, Elizabeth Park, Lawrence GRAD Only FALL 2014 MSC: Core
Race, Genomics, and Society
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 190FS GENOME 190FS
AAAS 190FS
Was: AAAS 159S.03
Royal, Charmaine UG Only FALL 2014 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Research Methods in Global Health
Crosslisted as PSY 309

Introduction to methodological techniques used in global health research, including qualitative field work, quantitative surveys, experimental designs, intervention trials, and program evaluation. Teaches strengths and weaknesses of each method, and how to determine the most appropriate method for specific research questions. Takes a problem-based approach, emphasizing the interdisciplinary nature of global health research. Focuses on how to evaluate published & unpublished research and how to design a global health research project. Skills include: identification of global health problems, conceptualization of a research question, designing a research study, and interpretation of results.

Course Notes
For students who matriculated at Duke in Fall 2009 or later, this is the only Methods course approved for the GHC. Students who matriculated at Duke prior to Fall 2009 will have had other options to fulfill the GHC Methods requirement.
GLHLTH 371
Was: GLHLTH 163
Ariely, Sumedha UG Only FALL 2014 GHC: Methods
GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Core – Research
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Research Methods in Global Health
Crosslisted as PSY 309

Introduction to methodological techniques used in global health research, including qualitative field work, quantitative surveys, experimental designs, intervention trials, and program evaluation. Teaches strengths and weaknesses of each method, and how to determine the most appropriate method for specific research questions. Takes a problem-based approach, emphasizing the interdisciplinary nature of global health research. Focuses on how to evaluate published & unpublished research and how to design a global health research project. Skills include: identification of global health problems, conceptualization of a research question, designing a research study, and interpretation of results.
Introduction to research methods through examination of a variety of methodological techniques in behavioral and social sciences and relevant to multidisciplinary GH research. Problem-based approach to practice identifying GH questions of interest, ways to operationalize and test them, including strengths and weaknesses of different approaches. Focus on discussing current GH issues, exploring questions and solutions, reading and evaluating published research and interpreting results. Skills include identification of global health problems, awareness of contextual, behavioral, and ethical issues involved, conceptualization of research questions, and designing a research study.

Course Notes
For students who matriculated at Duke in Fall 2009 or later, this is the only Methods course approved for the GHC. Students who matriculated at Duke prior to Fall 2009 will have had other options to fulfill the GHC Methods requirement.
GLHLTH 371
Was: GLHLTH 163
Meade, Christina UG Only SPRING 2014 GHC: Methods
GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Core – Research
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Research Practicum- Costa Rica

Introduces students to research design, field methods, and basic data analysis in a tropical context. Skills include hypothesis testing and statistical analysis, orientation to basic software packages, write and present scientific papers, and design and conduct epidemiologic research.
nIntroduces students to research design, field methods, and basic data analysis in a tropical context. Skills include hypothesis testing and statistical analysis, orientation to basic software packages, write and present scientific papers, and design and conduct epidemiologic research.

Course Notes
Course taught as part of the Costa Rica-Global Health study abroad program offered through OTS.
GLHLTH 380A
Was: GLHLTH 172
Benavides Rawson, Jorge UG Only SPRING 2014 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Social Determinants of U.S. Health Disparities
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 340

Introduction to how social factors influence health and well-being, with a particular focus on contemporary U.S. society. Topics include obesity, aging, socioeconomic disadvantage, access to health insurance, public health systems, the role of the media, and racial/ethnic and gender inequalities. The course will provide descriptive assessments of health inequalities and analytic examinations of the mechanisms through which social factors affect health.

SOCIOL 361
Was: SOCIOL 161
Hamil-Luker, Jenifer UG Only SPRING 2014 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Social Determinants
Special Topics Women's Health Technologies

This course will introduce the role of technology in healthcare, with an emphasis on women's health locally and globally. Through reverse engineering modules, student groups will focus on understanding how devices are made and how they work for use in health/medicine. The course will also consist of lectures, case studies, documentaries and a course project that will engage engineering and non-engineering students to think critically about how medical technologies play a role in women's health, how they are created and how they are implemented in real life scenarios.

GLHLTH 390
Was: GLHLTH 180
Ramanujam, Nimmi UG Only SPRING 2014 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Special Topics- Seminar Healthcare in Developing Countries

In this age of globalization, the expectations of life-saving technologies cross borders readily, but the introduction and adaptation of these technologies in resource-limited settings often lag behind. While we often think of technologies such as AIDS drugs, there are many appropriate technologies that are potentially transformative for improving local health – making water potable, cookstoves more efficient and less polluting, and diagnostics more available in local clinics. Behind each of these technologies, there are innovators, sometimes publicly funded researchers, other times private companies, often social entrepreneurs.
In this course, students will critically examine the policy and philanthropic landscape behind these areas of appropriate technology. Beyond the engineering of these technologies, what is the social engineering of policies that minimize inequity? For example, is potable water best tackled with an innovation that serves the needs of an individual (e.g., Life Straw), a group (e.g., solar disinfectant system), or an entire community (e.g., chlorination of a local reservoir). Through the lens of these technologies, students will consider what factors help enable local innovation, from intellectual and financial capital to end-user input and systems for sharing and owning knowledge. What forms of philanthropy – from microcredit and giving circles to donor aid – work best to foster local innovation and to build local capacity? What are the ethical issues involved in introducing technologies, from double standards in quality to donor-recipient relationships? This course seeks to prepare those engaged in such work to consider the policy ramifications of designing innovation for global health.

PUBPOL 590S
Was: PUBPOL 264S.32
Martin-Staple, Anne UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
Trauma and Global Mental Health in Haiti

Haiti as a case study in global mental health approaches to traumatic stress. Explores the genesis of the diagnostic rubric of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and its relationship to local cultural contexts. Assesses critical and globalized approaches to adversity and shock reactions, with an emphasis on pioneering multi-site critical methodologies. Explores how global mental health practices have been analyzed and applied to Haiti by Haitian and non-Haitian practitioners. Fiction and prose by Edwidge Danticat will serve to bring historical and contemporary risks, ramifications, and co-morbidities of traumatic stress in Haiti into focus Haiti as a case study in global mental health approaches to traumatic stress. Explores the genesis of the diagnostic rubric of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and its relationship to local cultural contexts. Assesses critical and globalized approaches to adversity and shock reactions, with an emphasis on pioneering multi-site critical methodologies. Explores how global mental health practices have been analyzed and applied to Haiti by Haitian and non-Haitian practitioners. Fiction and prose by Edwidge Danticat will serve to bring historical and contemporary risks, ramifications, and co-morbidities of traumatic stress in Haiti into focus.

GLHLTH 323
Jenson, Deborah UG Only SPRING 2014 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Humanities
Tropical Medicine - Costa Rica

Part of a 15-week semester abroad program in Costa Rica (through OTS). Integrates classroom and field instruction to introduce fundamental principles of tropical medicine and public health including the tropical environment and its related health issues nPart of a 15-week semester abroad program in Costa Rica (through OTS). Integrates classroom and field instruction to introduce fundamental principles of tropical medicine and public health including the tropical environment and its related health issues; topics include infectious diseases, epidemiology, virology, zoonosis, sexual health, environmental and global health, traditional and alternative medicine, ethics, and the social and economic determinants that contribute to the expanding impact of infectious diseases. Prerequisites: 1 semester of Biology and 1 year of Spanish or equivalent.

GLHLTH 383A
Was: GLHLTH 171
Staff UG Only SPRING 2014 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
US Health Disparities
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 340

The most commonly used indices to measure United States health disparities by race/ethnicity; origins and evolution of racial/ethnic categories in the United States Census; role of poverty, racial residential segregation, and inadequate health care in explaining racial/ethnic health disparities; and the promise and limitations of academic-community partnerships and public policy initiatives designed to reduce and ultimately eliminate those health disparities.

SOCIOL 361
Was: SOCIOL 129
Staff UG Only FALL 2014 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Voices in Global Health: Hindi Tutorial

Through practical and theoretical discussions around case studies, personal narratives, documentaries and recorded interviews in the Hindi language, students examine how language and culture impact health beliefs and behaviors. Explore underlying reasons for different beliefs and behaviors with the goal of creating culturally appropriate interventions. Meet weekly for 75-minutes. Prerequisite: Hindi 203 or equivalent. Half credit. Through practical and theoretical discussions around case studies, personal narratives, documentaries and recorded interviews in the Hindi language, students examine how language and culture impact health beliefs and behaviors. Explore underlying reasons for different beliefs and behaviors with the goal of creating culturally appropriate interventions. Meet weekly for 75-minutes. Prerequisite: Hindi 203 or equivalent. Half credit.

GLHLTH 270T-04
Vaishnava, Premlata UG Only FALL 2014 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Water Quality Health

Explore basic concepts of water quality and human health with focus on the global water cycle, global water demand and availability, chemical properties of water, contaminants in water, health implications, and environmental isotope hydrology. Highlights relationships between human activities, water scarcity, water quality degradation, and ecological and health consequences. Addresses some policy implications related to conflicts over water resources and impact of energy production on water resources. Prerequisites: prior knowledge of introductory calculus and chemistry or consent of instructor.

EOS 524
Vengosh, Avner UG/GRAD SPRING 2014 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MSC: Elective
Water, Cooperation, and Conflict
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 533s ENVIRON 543S

Focuses on potential for transboundary water resources-related conflict and cooperation. Discusses water scarcity concepts, natural resource conflict theory, hydro politics, hydro hegemony, water security, water markets and institutions, game theory, and international water law. Other topics include the economics of water and health. Case studies complement the broader course outlook. Focuses on potential for transboundary water resources-related conflict and cooperation. Discusses water scarcity concepts, natural resource conflict theory, hydro politics, hydro hegemony, water security, water markets and institutions, game theory, and international water law. Other topics include the economics of water and health. Case studies complement the broader course outlook.

PUBPOL 580S
Was: PUBPOL 264S
Jeuland, Marc UG/GRAD SPRING 2014 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
African Health Systems, NGOs, and GH

Explores complex institutional environment of African health systems, emphasizing NGOs. Weaves together: (1) social, political, economic context of Africa; (2) origins/current condition of African health systems; (3) evolution of NGOs in these systems, and in global health and international development; (4) transitions in global health governance from WHO in the 1940s to complex actors of today; (5) role of primary health care in global health, from 1978 Alma Ata Declaration to primary healthcare packages in country plans. Topics pursued in historical and contemporary terms through team projects, case studies focused on health systems and institutional actors in representative countries.

GLHLTH 671
Toole, David UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Aids and Other Emerging Diseases BIOLOGY 154
Was: BIOLOGY 46B
Broverman, Sherryl UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Natural Science
Air Quality Management

Types, sources, effects of air pollutants. Regulatory framework emphasizing the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and federal, state, local agency implementation. Application of risk assessment, technology, market incentives to air management. Scientific, policy aspects of acid deposition, global climate change, indoor air, mobile sources control. Dispersion modeling, exposure assessment. Instructor: Vandenberg. 3 units.

ENVIRON 535
Was: ENVIRON 235
Vandenburg, John UG/GRAD FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
Design for the Developing World

Design of custom devices to help the specific and unique needs of developing world hospitals. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized; overview of developing world conditions, patent issues, engineering ethics.Oral and written reports will be required. Students may elect to personally deliver their projects to a developing world hospital, if selected, in the summer following the course. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 154L and Statistics 113. Consent of instructor required.

BME 462L
Was: BME 262
Malkin, Robert UG Only FALL 2013 GHC: Methods
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
GHC: Elective
Design for the Developing World

Design of custom devices to help the specific and unique needs of developing world hospitals. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized; overview of developing world conditions, patent issues, engineering ethics.Oral and written reports will be required. Students may elect to personally deliver their projects to a developing world hospital, if selected, in the summer following the course. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 154L and Statistics 113. Consent of instructor required.

BME 462L
Was: BME 262
Malkin, Robert UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Methods
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
GHC: Elective
Designing Innovation for Global Health

In this age of globalization, the expectations of life-saving technologies cross borders readily, but the introduction and adaptation of these technologies in resource-limited settings often lag behind. While we often think of technologies such as AIDS drugs, there are many appropriate technologies that are potentially transformative for improving local health--making water potable, cookstoves more efficient and less polluting, and diagnostics more available in local clinics. Behind each of these technologies, there are innovators, sometimes publicly funded researchers, other times private companies, often social entrepreneurs. In this course, students will critically examine the policy and philanthropic landscape behind these areas of appropriate technology. Beyond the engineering of these technologies, what is the social engineering of policies that minimize inequity? For example, is potable water best tackled with an innovation that serves the needs of an individual (e.g., Life Straw), a group (e.g., solar disinfectant system), or an entire community (e.g., chlorination of a local reservoir). Through the lens of these technologies, students will consider what factors help enable local innovation, from intellectual and financial capital to end-user input and systems for sharing and owning knowledge. What forms of philanthropy—from microcredit and giving circles to donor aid—work best to foster local innovation and to build local capacity? What are the ethical issues involved in introducing technologies, from double standards in quality to donor-recipient relationships? This course seeks to prepare those engaged in such work to consider the policy ramifications of designing innovation for global health.

PUBPOL 642S
Was: PUBPOL 213
So, Anthony UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Devices For People With Disabilities

Design of custom devices to aid disabled individuals. Students will be paired with health care professionals at local hospitals who will supervise the development of projects for specific clients. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized; overview of assistive technologies, patent issues, engineering ethics. Oral and written reports will be required. Selected projects may be continued as independent study. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 154L and Statistics 113. Consent of instructor required. Design of custom devices to aid disabled individuals. Students will be paired with health care professionals at local hospitals who will supervise the development of projects for specific clients. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized; overview of assistive technologies, patent issues, engineering ethics. Oral and written reports will be required. Selected projects may be continued as independent study. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 354L and Statistical Science 130. Service Learning Course.

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC ELECTIVE. Counts as Elective only if taken prior to Fall 2009.
BME 460L
Was: BME 260
Bohs, Laurence UG Only FALL 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Devices For People With Disabilities

Design of custom devices to aid disabled individuals. Students will be paired with health care professionals at local hospitals who will supervise the development of projects for specific clients. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized; overview of assistive technologies, patent issues, engineering ethics. Oral and written reports will be required. Selected projects may be continued as independent study. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 154L and Statistics 113. Consent of instructor required. Design of custom devices to aid disabled individuals. Students will be paired with health care professionals at local hospitals who will supervise the development of projects for specific clients. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized; overview of assistive technologies, patent issues, engineering ethics. Oral and written reports will be required. Selected projects may be continued as independent study. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 354L and Statistical Science 130. Service Learning Course.

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC ELECTIVE. Counts as Elective only if taken prior to Fall 2009.
BME 460L
Was: BME 260
Goldberg, Richard UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Displacement and Global Health
Crosslisted as CULANTH 290S GLHLTH 390S

A discussion of the health consequences of global displacement, including nutrition, mental health and lifestyle diseases, with a focus on social/community impacts and policy solutions. Particular attention will be paid to the ethics of asylum and the extent to which refugees are actually afforded the physical and mental health protection and support they need.

ETHICS 390S
El-Shaarawi, Nadia UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Economic Growth and Development Policy

Basic principles and policy issues in the study of economic growth and development. The roles of physical, natural and human capital, technological innovation, productivity improvements and institutions in explaining patterns andncauses of variations in growth and development performance of countries. Effects on growth and development of many current policy issues including HIV-AIDs, financial crises, foreign aid and investment, debt burdens and forgiveness, corruption and governance. Prerequisite: Public Policy Studies 302.

PUBPOL 598
Fernholz, Fernando UG/GRAD FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
Engineering Sustainable Design and Construction

Design and testing of solutions to complex interdisciplinary design products in a service learning context. Technical design principles; sustainable and engineering best practices; prototype formation, testing and evaluation; and establishment of research and analysis methodologies in a community based research experience. Working in partnership with a community agency (local, national, or international) and participation in an experimental learning process by engineering a design solution for an identified community need. Evaluation focused on design deliverables, fabricated prototypes and a critical reflection of the experimental learning process. One credit. Prerequisites: EGR 75 or ECE 27 or consent of instructor.

CE 315
Was: CE 185
Schaad, David UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Environmental Chemisty and Toxicology

An overview of the fate, transport
and biological effects of chemicals in the environment. Four types of chemicals that archetypical of environmental
pollutants will be discussed, including polar and non-polar organic compounds; such as insecticides and
pesticides; oxidants; and metals. Topics include characterization of pollutants, the chemistry of natural
waters, soils and atmosphere; chemical transport between compartments; chemical and biological transformation;
and the ecological, toxicological, and molecular biological responses associated with chemical exposure. Case studies will be incorporated that focus on the impact of chemical pollutants on large-scale ecosystems and human health.

ENVIRON 360
Was: ENVIRON 160
Meyer, Joel Stapleton, Heather UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Environmental Toxicology

Study of environmental contaminants from a broad perspective encompassing biochemical, ecological, and toxicological principles and methodologies. Discussion of sources, environmental transport and transformation phenomena, accumulation in biota and ecosystems. Impacts at various levels of organization, particularly biochemical and physiological effects. Prerequisites: organic chemistry and vertebrate physiology or consent of instructor. Instructor: Di Giulio. 3 units.

ENVIRON 501
Was: ENVIRON 212
Meyer, Joel UG/GRAD FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
Ethics For Global Health Research

This course will present an overview of practical and theoretical approaches to bioethics from a range of perspectives, including the humanities, law, philosophy, medicine and science. Students will apply various resources, terminology and frameworks to case studies which will prepare them for their own research. The course will include IRB and responsible conduct of research. (2 credits)

GLHLTH 740
Was: GLHLTH 330
Stewart, Kearsley GRAD Only SPRING 2013 MSC: Core
Ethics of Infectious Disease

Examination of the role of ethical decision-making when controlling infectious disease epidemics. Applies classic public health ethics of balancing individual liberty vs. public good to the new global health context of emerging infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, Ebola, and SARS, plus re-emerging infectious diseases such as multidrug-resistant TB, polio, and cholera. Explores questions of resource allocation, mandatory or voluntary prevention measures, and ethical obligations of health care workers vs. responsibilities of individuals in the context of new global public health. Prior global health coursework recommended.

GLHLTH 341
Stewart, Kearsley UG Only FALL 2013 GHC: Ethics
MAJOR: Core – Ethics
MINOR: Ethics
Fieldwork Methods: Cultural Analysis And Interpretation

Anthropology as a discipline (a field of study) and the site where anthropologists work: the field. Combines theories of anthropological fieldwork methods with practice, including participation, observation, and interviews. Students undertake original research in a local fieldsite of their choice and produce their own mini-ethnography.

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC METHODS OR ELECTIVE. Counts as METHODS OR Elective only if taken prior to Fall 2009.
CULANTH 302
Was: CULANTH 194
Matza, Thomas UG Only FALL 2013
Food and the Body
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 320

This course is a seminar-based investigation into the social, cultural, and political connections between food and the body. Students will approach these connections from two perspectives: The relationship between food and culture, and how the body is key to that relationship. Readings are drawn primarily from cultural anthropology, and use cross-cultural examples to illustrate these perspectives. Specific course themes include: Food and cultural identity; nationalism and eating; social class and taste; global food production; gender and eating disorders; the politics of organic and local foods; and the rise of obesity. Students will lead weekly discussion of readings, and will complete a final research paper.

CULANTH 309
Solomon, Harris UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Food, Farming and Feminism

Viewing "agriculture," "nature," and "consumption" as pressing feminist themes and exploration of various dimensions of the cultural and political ecology/economy of producing, processing, circulating, preparing, and consuming sustenance. Particular focus on the ethical impact of US policy on rural farm communities and developing nations.

GLHLTH 225
Was: GLHLTH 892B
Staff UG Only FALL 2013 GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
Fundamentals of Global Health

Introduction to global health issues and challenges. Develop an understanding of key concepts, tools, and frameworks essential for continued study in global health. Focus on global disease burden, health determinants and disparities, health policy and actors, and challenges of global health interventions. Explore the importance of understanding and addressing global health through multidisciplinary frameworks of the natural sciences, social-behavioral sciences, humanities, and policy. Consists of lecture and learning labs, intensive small group discussion, and global health case analyses. Intended for undergraduates.

GLHLTH 101
Boyd, David UG Only FALL 2013 GHC: Intro
MAJOR: Core – Fundamentals
MINOR: Fundamentals
Gender, Poverty, and Health
Crosslisted as SOCIOL 212

This course will examine the interconnections among gender, poverty, and health. It will adopt a global perspective on these issues, with a focus on low- and middle-income countries as well as the United States. We will learn that health has more to do with social location than with biology; it is something that is enjoyed by the privileged and struggled for by the socially marginalized. Further, among the most important social determinants of health are gender, race and class, and it is very challenging to disentangle their respective effects. They help shape vulnerability to disease and poor health outcomes. They help explain access to care as well as the consequences of illness and disease. They help account for what we consider to be health problems in the first place. And, they must be addressed if efforts to promote health are to be successful in the long term.

GLHLTH 212
Was: GLHLTH 112
Watt, Melissa UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MAJOR: Foundations – Social Determinants
General Microbiology

The course consists of a lecture and laboratory, each of which meets twice a week. Lectures include an overview of the history of microbiology, and cover both classical and modern bacteriological principles. Topics discussed include prokaryotic and eukaryotic structure, criteria used in classification, physiology (including reproduction, growth and metabolism), genetics (classical and molecular), infection and immunity, and environmental and industrial aspects involving microorganisms.

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC METHODS. Counts as Methods only if taken prior to Fall 2009.
BIOLOGY 212L
Was: BIOLOGY 103L
Schmid, Amy UG Only FALL 2013 GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
General Microbiology

The course consists of a lecture and laboratory, each of which meets twice a week. Lectures include an overview of the history of microbiology, and cover both classical and modern bacteriological principles. Topics discussed include prokaryotic and eukaryotic structure, criteria used in classification, physiology (including reproduction, growth and metabolism), genetics (classical and molecular), infection and immunity, and environmental and industrial aspects involving microorganisms.

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC METHODS. Counts as Methods only if taken prior to Fall 2009.
BIOLOGY 212L
Was: BIOLOGY 103L
Staff UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
Genomic Perspectives on Human Evolution
Crosslisted as BIOLOGY 554

Human evolutionary history as studied from the perspective of the genome. Nature of contemporary genomic data and how they are interpreted in the context of the fossil record, comparative anatomy, psychology, and cultural studies. Examination of both the origin of modern humans as a distinct species and subsequent migration across the world. Emphasis on language, behavior, and disease susceptibility as traits of particular evolutionary interest. Prerequisite: Biology 118 or equivalent course. Instructor: Wray

BIOLOGY 554
Was: BIOLOGY 274-01
Wray, Gregory UG/GRAD FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
Global Bioethics
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 241

No course description available

PHIL 281
Was: PHIL 195
Sreenivasan, Gopal UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Ethics
GHC: Elective
MINOR: Ethics
MAJOR: Core – Ethics
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Environmental Health: Economics and Policy
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 538 PUBPOL 582

Social science perspective on global environmental health. Students will learn to identify primary environmental causes of high burden diseases such as malaria, diarrhea, and respiratory infections; describe how to measure socio-economic impacts of global environmental health diseases; discuss key policies to control global environmental health problems based on private prevention and therapeutic behaviors; and propose frameworks to empirically monitor and evaluate global environmental health policies. A sub-module will focus on climate change and water-borne diseases. Prerequisites: Intro course in statistics.

ENVIRON 538
Was: ENVIRON 238
Pattanayak, Subhrendu UG/GRAD FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
Global Health and Genomics
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 510S

Explores the origins of, and current developments in global genomics research. Examples of genomics research and its applications with global health from medicine, agriculture, and environmental sciences. Students will gain familiarity with underlying science, critically analyze ethical, legal and social issues that arise in conduct of genomic research and policies surrounding design and conduct of genomic research, especially in developing countries and with indigenous peoples. Explore how design of genomic research and its commercialization affect access to products and services in the context of global health disparity. Familiarity with basic concepts of genetics and genomics preferred.

GENOME 508S
Chandrasekharan, Subhashini UG/GRAD FALL 2013 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MSC: Elective
Global Health and International Development in the Nonprofit Sector

Explore issues of global health and international development work in the non-profit sector. Topics include, delivery of culturally appropriate global health assistance to low resource countries, challenges in working in developing countries, different approaches to development work, management principles of non-governmental organizations (NGO's), and monitoring and evaluation of global health program outcomes. Topics will be explored through lecture, discussion and small group work. Final class presentation and paper will focus on developing a case study centered on a select global health problem and the non-profit organization(s) approach to delivering health care solutions.

GLHLTH 351
Was: GLHLTH 166
Walmer, Katherine UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Health Capstone

Capstone Course for students in Global Health Certificate. Group analysis of a current global health problem/issue. Project involves background research, data acquisition, analysis, writing, and presentation of a substantial research paper/report at an advanced level. Consent of instructor required.

Course Notes
Course number was GLHLTH 255S prior to spring 2010. Course is no longer offered as a seminar.
GLHLTH 501
Was: GLHLTH 255
Boyd, David UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 GHC: Capstone
MAJOR: Senior Seminar
Global Health Challenges

Course introduces major global health problems and social, behavioral, economic, biomedical and environmental determinants of health in resource limited settings. Topics include communicable diseases i.e. HIV, malaria, tuberculosis and common childhood diseases; chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and mental health; and determinants of health associated with these diseases, such as poverty, gender imbalance, culture, poor environmental sanitation, malnutrition, tobacco use, and climate change. Other topics may include health promotion, reproductive health, maternal and child health, and disaster preparedness.

GLHLTH 701
Was: GLHLTH 310
Woods, Chris GRAD Only FALL 2013 MSC: Core
Global Health Ethics
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 210
PUBPOL 330
Was: PUBPOL 155
Whetten, Kathryn UG Only FALL 2013 GHC: Ethics
GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Ethics
MAJOR: Core – Ethics
Global Health Research: Design and Practice

Course provides a foundation in study design, research question development, field implementation, measurement, validity and reliability. Quantitative and qualitative research approaches are examined. Students build critical skills in reading, interpreting and synthesizing scientific literature. The selection of appropriate measurements and survey development is emphasized and issues in field implementation explored.

GLHLTH 702
Was: GLHLTH 321
Sullivan, Kristen GRAD Only FALL 2013 MSC: Core
Global Health Research: Epidemiologic Methods II

Course builds on Epidemiologic Methods I to present advanced topics in epidemiology. Topics include review of study designs including meta-analysis; intensive study of bias, including confounding, selection bias, and misclassification; missing data; sensitivity analysis; topics in regression analysis; and an introduction to the analysis of time to event data, including lifetable methods, survival curves, and Cox proportional hazards regression. Discussions of causal inference and how to read, review, and write scientific literature. Course has a weekly data analysis lab section to develop programming and statistical analysis skills. Prerequisite: Epidemiologic Methods I or equivalent. Course builds on Epidemiologic Methods I to present advanced topics in epidemiology. Topics include review of study designs including meta-analysis; intensive study of bias, including confounding, selection bias, and misclassification; missing data; sensitivity analysis; topics in regression analysis; and an introduction to the analysis of time to event data, including lifetable methods, survival curves, and Cox proportional hazards regression. Discussions of causal inference and how to read, review, and write scientific literature. Course has a weekly data analysis lab section to develop programming and statistical analysis skills. Prerequisite: Epidemiologic Methods I or equivalent.

GLHLTH 706
Was: GLHLTH 325
Westreich, Daniel GRAD Only SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
Global Health Service, Research, & Ethics

Introduces ethical and human rights concepts in GH and current issues in health ethics. Explores how to understand and engage in ethical health service, intervention, research and education. Requires students analyze and critique the ethical choices of individuals, policy-makers and health workers. Engages in service activities during the course, students improve understanding of how an intellectual approach to ethics can be enhanced as well as counteracted by emotional impact that service often offers. Explores standards of care, access to care, best outcomes vs. distributed justice. Focuses on ethics related to Infectious Diseases; Obesity, Alcohol & Tobacco; and Environ Health.

GLHLTH 373S
Ariely, Sumedha UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Ethics
GHC: Elective
MINOR: Ethics
MAJOR: Core – Ethics
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Health Systems and Policy

Introduces global health systems and policy in four modules: 1.Globalization; 2. Health; 3. Systems; 4. Policy. Draws on faculty from a range of disciplines, including anthropology, biology, economics, history, medicine, political science, and sociology, to situate the concept and practice of "global health" within these four broad themes. Provides an understanding of variations in health systems around the world and of current issues in global health policy, including the political economies of health care, decision-making processes, governance structures, and the resource-constrained realities of global health policy-making.

GLHLTH 303
Toole, David UG Only FALL 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Policy
MINOR: Elective
Global Mental Health
Crosslisted as PSY 611S
GLHLTH 660
Was: GLHLTH 223S
Staff UG/GRAD FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
Global Mental Health
Crosslisted as CULANTH 611S PSY 611S
GLHLTH 660
Was: GLHLTH 223S
Puffer, Eve UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Provides the student the opportunity to incorporate health promotion and disease prevention assessment and intervention into the health of clients across the life span. Applying the principles of health education, the course prepares students to use the tools and skills necessary to provide health promotion and disease
prevention services to individuals, families, groups, and communities. The definition of health and the factors that impact an individual's or group's health framework is the basis for understanding health maintenance interventions. 3 credits.

NURSING 502
Was: NURSING 502
Utley-Smith, Queen UG/GRAD FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Provides the student the opportunity to incorporate health promotion and disease prevention assessment and intervention into the health of clients across the life span. Applying the principles of health education, the course prepares students to use the tools and skills necessary to provide health promotion and disease
prevention services to individuals, families, groups, and communities. The definition of health and the factors that impact an individual's or group's health framework is the basis for understanding health maintenance interventions. 3 credits.

NURSING 502
Was: NURSING 502
Staff UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
Health Systems in Developing Countries

This course introduces students to key challenges faced in strengthening of health systems in low and middle income countries. The course will cover a diverse set of topics including an overview of organization of health systems, models of purchasing and providing health care, innovations in financing health care, and issues in service delivery such as quality of care and human resource challenges. Students will learn frameworks and methods employed in the evaluation of health systems. The course will also draw attention to resource allocation problems and various frameworks used to address them. The course will primarily rely on readings from a variety of health policy, economics and other social science journals.

GLHLTH 750
Was: GLHLTH 340
Mohanan, Manoj GRAD Only SPRING 2013 MSC: Core
Health, Culture and the Latino Community

Issues associated with access to the health care industry for growing Latino/a population in the US. Topics: cultural competency issues, medical practices, lexical knowledge related to the field. Develop research proposal informed by required 20 hours of service work with local community partners. Assessment on knowledge of content, oral and written Spanish, and participation in service. Recommended students take 100-level Spanish course prior to enrolling. Pre-requisite: Spanish 76 or equivalent.

SPANISH 306
Was: SPANISH 106A
Paredes, Liliana UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
History of Public Health in America HISTORY 369
Was: HISTORY 189B
Humphreys, Margaret UG Only FALL 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Social Determinants
History of Public Health in America HISTORY 369
Was: HISTORY 189B
Humphreys, Margaret UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Social Determinants
Human Genetics

Topics include segregation, genetic linkage, population genetics, multifactorial inheritance, biochemical genetics, cytogenetics, somatic cell genetics, neurogenetics, cancer genetics, clinical genetics, positional cloning, complex disease. Lectures plus weekly discussion of assigned papers from the research literature. Prerequisites: University Program in Genetics 278 or equivalent, and graduate status or consent of instructor. Instructors: Marchuk, Pericak-Vance, and Speer. 3 units. C-L: University Program in Genetics 232

MGM 532
Was: MGM 232
Marchuk, Douglas UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment

Topics central to both health and ecological risk assessment are explored. Basic concepts of hazard identification, dose response relationships, exposure assessment, and risk characterization and
communication are discussed in the context of both human health and environmental assessment. The basis and rationale for using specific, as well as extrapolated, scientific information and expert judgment, and the strengths and weaknesses of alternative approaches, are evaluated. Applications emphasizing real cases are used to illustrate the interdisciplinary process and products of risk assessment, as well as the regulatory use of the information. Group projects emphasized. Instructors: Mihaich and McMasters. 3 units

Course Notes
Counts as Methods for students matriculating in or before fall 2009.
ENVIRON 539
Was: ENVIRON 239
Mihaich, Ellen UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 GHC: Methods
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
Implementation Research and Health

Implementation Research/Operational Research (IR/OR) studies how to improve uptake, implementation, and translation of research findings into routine and common practices ('know-do' or 'evidence to program' gap); moves results from effectiveness studies and efficacy trials to real-world settings, obtaining information to guide scale-up; helps implementers apply lessons from a program in one context to developing a similar program in a similar environment. Course covers: framework of IR/OR; methods of identifying program implementation problems; how to organize and develop an IR/OR proposal; main study design, research methods, data collection and analysis used in IR/OR; approaches to capacity building for IR/OR in developing countries.

GLHLTH 751
Was: GLHLTH 350
Tang, Shenglan GRAD Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Infectious Disease

Covers the physiology and the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of a suite of infectious diseases. Case studies will include measles, influenza, dengue, cholera, Lyme disease, herpes, tuberculosis, and rabies, among others, with an emphasis on pathogens infecting humans. Topics include: basic immunology, the physiology of different disease processes and transmission, the role of population size on disease transmission, the effects of climate and behavioral changes on disease dynamics, networks of disease spread, spatial spread of disease, evolution of virulence, antigenic evolution, emerging infectious diseases. Koelle and Johnsen.

BIOLOGY 365
Was: BIOLOGY 146
Koelle, Katharina UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Innovation and Policy Entrepreneurship

This course will analyze a sampling of innovative policies and programs that were initiated to solve major problems in developed and developing countries. Some of the approaches worked; some did not. All of them, however, challenged conventional thinking, hence the title of the course ‘innovative policies’. During the semester we will discuss the following issues: crisis, innovation and policy space, leadership, transformation and transitions, innovation from within and from without, sectoral opportunity, unintended consequences, and the dynamics of decision making for innovative policies. Among the examples we will discuss are the Marshall Plan in Europe, the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, Thailand’s approach to Family Planning, and the start of major civic volunteerism in the United States. The course will use the case approach. Each week, we will discuss a policy or set of policies. Students enrolled in the course will be asked to join a group (2-3) to discuss, analyze and present the cases. They are expected to develop a case and present it. We will also have films that highlight some aspect of a case.

PUBPOL 726
Was: PUBPOL 383G.01
Fernholz, Fernando GRAD Only SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
Integrated Environmental Design

Student design teams complete a preliminary design of an actual environmental engineering project and present the design to a panel of civil engineering faculty and practitioners. A written technical report is required. Topics to be addressed include: the design process; cost estimation; legal, ethical, and social aspects of professional engineering practice; short-term and long-term design serviceability considerations. Open only to civil engineering students during their final two semesters. Prerequisites: Civil Engineering 120L, 123L, 124L.

CE 469
Was: CE 193
Schaad, David UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Methods
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
GHC: Elective
Introduction to Epidemiology: Focus on Global Health

Introduces students to the main concepts and methods used in population-based epidemiology research. Topics covered include measures of disease frequency, study design, measures of association, and problems of bias, especially as they pertain to global health research. Students will learn to understand and evaluate epidemiological studies. A prior quantitative course is highly recommended.

GLHLTH 362
Was: GLHLTH 161
Maselko, Joanna UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Introduction to Maternal and Child Health

Provides solid foundation in global perspectives on maternal and child health research, practice, and policy. Utilize case analysis to examine critical health challenges facing women, children, providers, and policymakers in some of the world's most vulnerable communities. Course designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students.

GLHLTH 571
Green, Eric UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Introduction to Medicine, Science and Technology

nOffers comparative introduction to understandings of medicine, science, and technology in different historical contexts. Explore differences over time and space to better understand what is particular to our own conceptions of knowledge and scientific truth. Particularly useful for students planning to concentrate in Medicine, Science, and Technology as History majors

GLHLTH 174D-001
Matthew, John UG Only FALL 2013 MAJOR: Focused Study
GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
Introductory Demographic Measures and Concepts
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 532S

This is an introductory course in demographic concepts, measures and techniques. The primary objective is to learn how demographers measure population change, mortality, morbidity, fertility, marriage, divorce, and migration. The course also illustrates the broader application of demographic measurement and techniques to other aspects of society and population health, such as educational attainment, labor force participation, linkages between mortality, morbidity and disability, and health and mortality differentials. The understanding of the materials is aided by a series of problem sets which are designed to help students learn to apply demographic methods.

GLHLTH 530S
Was: GLHLTH 250
Merli, Maria-Giovanna UG/GRAD FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Social Determinants
MINOR: Elective
Media and Health Communication
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 261

PSY 211 MEDIA AND HEALTH COMMUNICATION SS Health communication theory, research, and practice. Major topics include the impact of media on health and behavior, use of mass, new, and social media strategies for health promotion, patient-provider communication, and the role of of culture in health communication campaign design. Students should have basic understanding of social science research methods.

PSY 211
Bennett, Gary UG Only FALL 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Medical Anthropology
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 321T

Cross cultural experiences and understanding of health and illness, the body and non-biological aspects of medicine. Culture-specific sickness (like envidia, running amok, attention deficit disorder). Class, race, and gender inflected experiences of health. Various societies' organization of health care specialists, including biomedical doctors, voudon priestesses, and shamans.

CULANTH 424T
Was: CULANTH 191U/T
Solomon, Harris UG Only FALL 2013 GHC: Ethics
GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MAJOR: Foundations – Humanities
Medical Anthropology
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 321T

Cross cultural experiences and understanding of health and illness, the body and non-biological aspects of medicine. Culture-specific sickness (like envidia, running amok, attention deficit disorder). Class, race, and gender inflected experiences of health. Various societies' organization of health care specialists, including biomedical doctors, voudon priestesses, and shamans.

CULANTH 424T
Was: CULANTH 191U/T
Solomon, Harris UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Ethics
GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MAJOR: Foundations – Humanities
Microbial Ecology and Evolution

Survey of new advances in the field of environmental and evolutionary microbiology, based on current literature, discussion, and laboratory exercises. Topics to include bacterial phylogeny, molecular ecology, emerging infectious diseases, bacterial symbiosis, experimental evolution, evolution of drug resistance, and microbial genomics. Prerequisite: Biology 25L, 103L, 118, or consent of instructor. Instructor: Vilgalys. 4 units.

BIOLOGY 557L
Was: BIOLOGY 211L
Rytas, Vilgalys UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
Microbial Pathogenesis

Modern molecular genetic approaches to understanding the pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Underlying mechanisms of pathogenesis and host-parasite relationships that contribute to the infectious disease process.

MGM 582
Was: MGM 282
Baldivia, Raphael UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Narratives of Living with HIV/AIDS

How do we learn about the global experience of people living with HIV/AIDS? Read biographies, narratives, poetry, and blogs written by HIV persons, their families, friends, doctors, and caregivers. Listen to stories told in film documentaries and on the internet. Study interdisciplinary theories of identity and sexuality, illness narratives, narrative medicine, and doctor-patient communication. Reflect on the different meanings of the AIDS experience for men and women, young and old, in Brazil, Botswana, China, Haiti, Russia, South Africa, and rural and urban USA. Apply this new framework to investigate and analyze HIV/AIDS programs. Prior global health coursework recommended.

GLHLTH 302
Stewart, Kearsley UG Only FALL 2013 MAJOR: Foundations – Humanities
GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
Nation, Region and Global Economy

The changing configuration of global capitalism, with emphasis on comparing global regions of North America, Latin America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. The internal dynamics of these regions, including the development strategies of selected nations, interregional comparisons (for example, regional divisions of labor, state-society relationships, the nature of their business systems, quality of life issues). Research paper required.

SOCIOL 345
Was: SOCIOL 145
Hovsepian, Mary UG Only FALL 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Nation, Region and Global Economy

The changing configuration of global capitalism, with emphasis on comparing global regions of North America, Latin America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. The internal dynamics of these regions, including the development strategies of selected nations, interregional comparisons (for example, regional divisions of labor, state-society relationships, the nature of their business systems, quality of life issues). Research paper required.

SOCIOL 345
Was: SOCIOL 145
Christian, Michelle UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Non-Communicable Diseases

Course will provide an overview of the recent (mid-20th century to the present) trends in non-communicable disease epidemiology. Focus on four major non-communicable disease categories as separate modules: cardiovascular, oncologic, diabetic and pulmonary diseases. Case studies used to highlight selected geographic differences. By using lectures, assigned readings and classroom discussion the course aims to provide the student with a firm understanding of the shifting disease burden and the landscape of stakeholders and interventions to prevent the same.

GLHLTH 641
Bloomfield, Gerald UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
One Health: From Philosophy to Practice

Interdisciplinary course introducing construct of One Health as increasingly important to a holistic understanding of prevention of disease and maintenance of health. Includes discussion of bidirectional impact of animal health on human health, impact of earth’s changing ecology on health. Learning objectives include 1) to describe how different disciplines contribute to the practice of One Health, 2) to creatively design interdisciplinary interventions to improve Global Health using a One Health model. Course will include weekly 2-hour multi-campus seminar off-site at NC Biotechnology Center with on-campus discussion section using case studies to supplement the seminar.

GLHLTH 771
Was: GLHLTH 371
Woods, Chris Pan, William GRAD Only SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
Politics of International Aid in Low-Income Countries

The effectiveness of aid in low-income countries has been the subject of intense debate.The course will examine the context and objectives of international aid, the record and lessons, and recent efforts and proposals for change within the international community. There is a special (but not exclusive) focus on Africa, since more robust growth and poverty reduction on that continent are at the center of the aidneffectiveness debate. In this exploration of the politics of aid, attention will be focused on the principal stakeholders, their motivations, and the quality of interaction among the various players (Governments, NGOs, bilateral donors, and multilateral institutions), along with the bottom line whether aid is resulting in poverty reduction in low income countries. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with recent literature on the topic, key debates surrounding aid effectiveness, the policies and actions of different donors, and recent proposals and measures aimed at improving development assistance. The course is primarily a group discussion, with occasional mini-lectures, student presentations, debates, case studies, two papers, and a final simulation.

PUBPOL 724
Was: PUBPOL 383E.01
Pomerantz, Phyllis GRAD Only FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
Politics of International Aid in Low-Income Countries

The effectiveness of aid in low-income countries has been the subject of intense debate.The course will examine the context and objectives of international aid, the record and lessons, and recent efforts and proposals for change within the international community. There is a special (but not exclusive) focus on Africa, since more robust growth and poverty reduction on that continent are at the center of the aidneffectiveness debate. In this exploration of the politics of aid, attention will be focused on the principal stakeholders, their motivations, and the quality of interaction among the various players (Governments, NGOs, bilateral donors, and multilateral institutions), along with the bottom line whether aid is resulting in poverty reduction in low income countries. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with recent literature on the topic, key debates surrounding aid effectiveness, the policies and actions of different donors, and recent proposals and measures aimed at improving development assistance. The course is primarily a group discussion, with occasional mini-lectures, student presentations, debates, case studies, two papers, and a final simulation.

PUBPOL 724
Was: PUBPOL 383E.01
Pomerantz, Phyllis GRAD Only SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
Population and Environmental Dynamics and Human Health
Crosslisted as ENVIRON 637S

Course examines population, health and environment (PHE) dynamics with focus on interactions in developing or transition economies. Theoretical and empirical approaches governing PHE dynamics from multidisciplinary perspectives, including geography, public health/epidemiology, demography, and economics. Students will obtain experience in design and analysis of PHE studies, and epidemiology of vector-born, chronic and enteric infections.

GLHLTH 637S
Was: GLHLTH 237S
Pan, William UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
Proseminar in Social Psychology

Selected topics in microsociology and social psychology, including social interaction, decision making, social exchange, group processes, intergroup relations, self and identity, social structure and personality, social networks, and application in organizations and health care. Introduction to social psychology; rational choice and social exchange; sociology of self and identity; group processes and intergroup relations; experimental research; practicum; social psychology. Instructor: Smith-
Lovin. 3 units.

SOCIOL 770S
Was: SOCIOL 229S
Smith-Lovin, Lynn GRAD Only FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
Quantitative Method I

Course introduces principles of epidemiology, including disease frequency measures; measures of association; observational, experimental, and quasi-experimental study designs; validity -- confounding, selection bias, measurement error; reliability. Course interweaves introductory biostatistics for continuous and categorical variables. Course has a data analysis lab section in which students walk through a guided data analysis on a provided data set, such as Demographic and Health Surveys.

GLHLTH 705
Was: GLHLTH 320
Turner, Elizabeth GRAD Only FALL 2013 MSC: Core
Research Methods in Global Health
Crosslisted as PSY 309

Introduction to methodological techniques used in global health research, including qualitative field work, quantitative surveys, experimental designs, intervention trials, and program evaluation. Teaches strengths and weaknesses of each method, and how to determine the most appropriate method for specific research questions. Takes a problem-based approach, emphasizing the interdisciplinary nature of global health research. Focuses on how to evaluate published & unpublished research and how to design a global health research project. Skills include: identification of global health problems, conceptualization of a research question, designing a research study, and interpretation of results.

Course Notes
For students who matriculated at Duke in Fall 2009 or later, this is the only Methods course approved for the GHC. Students who matriculated at Duke prior to Fall 2009 will have had other options to fulfill the GHC Methods requirement.
GLHLTH 371
Was: GLHLTH 163
Ariely, Sumedha UG Only FALL 2013 GHC: Methods
GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Core – Research
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Research Methods in Global Health
Crosslisted as PSY 309

Introduction to methodological techniques used in global health research, including qualitative field work, quantitative surveys, experimental designs, intervention trials, and program evaluation. Teaches strengths and weaknesses of each method, and how to determine the most appropriate method for specific research questions. Takes a problem-based approach, emphasizing the interdisciplinary nature of global health research. Focuses on how to evaluate published & unpublished research and how to design a global health research project. Skills include: identification of global health problems, conceptualization of a research question, designing a research study, and interpretation of results.

Course Notes
For students who matriculated at Duke in Fall 2009 or later, this is the only Methods course approved for the GHC. Students who matriculated at Duke prior to Fall 2009 will have had other options to fulfill the GHC Methods requirement.
GLHLTH 371
Was: GLHLTH 163
Meade, Christina UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Methods
GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Core – Research
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Research Practicum- Costa Rica

Introduces students to research design, field methods, and basic data analysis in a tropical context. Skills include hypothesis testing and statistical analysis, orientation to basic software packages, write and present scientific papers, and design and conduct epidemiologic research.

Course Notes
Course taught as part of the Costa Rica-Global Health study abroad program offered through OTS.
GLHLTH 380A
Was: GLHLTH 172
Benavides Rawson, Jorge UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Resource Environmental Policy/environmental Politics
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 577

Environmental policy
formation and implementation in comparative perspective. Topics include interest groups, environmental movements
and parties, public opinion, political systems and institutions. Case students selected from the United States and other advanced industrialized countries and the developing world. Spring.

ENVIRON 577
Was: ENVIRON 274
Albright, Elizabeth UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Responsible Genomics

Survey of ethical, social, economic, and legal issues in genomics. Introduction to ethical reasoning and examination of selected issues calling for such analysis, including: special procedures for research involving human participants, (2) respect for privacy and confidentiality of genetic information; (3) historical and political background of health research funding, and (4) public-private research interactions such as intellectual property and conflict of interest. Instructor: Cook-Deegan. 3 units. (Also counts as a policy elective.)

PUBPOL 634
Was: PUBPOL 240
Chandrasekharan, Subhashini UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
Social Determinants of U.S. Health Disparities
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 340

Introduction to how social factors influence health and well-being, with a particular focus on contemporary U.S. society. Topics include obesity, aging, socioeconomic disadvantage, access to health insurance, public health systems, the role of the media, and racial/ethnic and gender inequalities. The course will provide descriptive assessments of health inequalities and analytic examinations of the mechanisms through which social factors affect health.

SOCIOL 361
Was: SOCIOL 161
Read, Jen'nan UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Social Determinants
Spatial Epidemiology and Demography
Crosslisted as ENVIRON 636

Use of analytical tools to understand spatial patterns in health and demographic events. Students acquire skills in spatial data analysis and interpreting spatial patterns. Students will understand fundamental concepts in spatial epidemiology and demography, including spatial autocorrelation, heterogeneity and bias, spatial interaction, and small area estimation; identify spatial and space-time clusters of events and judiciously evaluate hypothesis tests; and develop spatial regression models that appropriately account for spatial heterogeneity or explicitly model spatial autocorrelation. Success in this course requires prior knowledge of Geographic Information System and Statistics.

GLHLTH 636
Pan, William UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Special Topics Statistics For Policy Makers

The purpose of this course is to ensure that students are both critical consumers and effective producers of statistical evidence presented in support of policy arguments. Upon completing this course, students will have the capacity to analyze and evaluate arguments based on simple descriptive statistics, correlation, or multiple regression analysis. Students will also receive hand-on training in the creation of convincing statistical reports, from manipulating large datasets to conduction sensitivity analysis and presenting results.

PUBPOL 812
Was: PUBPOL 312
Pizer, William GRAD Only FALL 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Special Topics: Economics of Global Health
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 390 ECON 690 GLHLTH 690

Course in applied economics examining health issues in developing countries from the standpoint of applied microeconomic research. Specific topics: identifying effect of health on growth/development and reciprocal relationships between income, poverty & health. Discuss structural problems in delivery/provider quality, challenges of healthcare financing, and tension between adopting "high-tech" care while delivering basic care to others. Attention on issues of poverty alleviation & promise of foreign-aid, at heart of debates about healthcare in developing countries. Examine empirical evidence in support of interventions affecting health including success and failure of interventions that target infant mortality; diarrhea, worms; AIDS; and malaria. Where there is a paucity of evidence in a developing country context, will uses lessons from American experience. Pre-reqs: Econ 201 or PPS 303 and Econ 208 or PPS 604, or instructor consent.n

ECON 390
Field, Erica UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Special Topics: Food Policy
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 590S

Food markets (supply and demand of food, domestic and international markets for food), food policy (policies geared toward consumers, policies geared toward producers), food politics (the political economy of food, food and conflict, famines), the future of food (biotechnology, futures and options, etc.), as well as contemporary controversies (e.g., local food, organic vs. industrial food, etc.)n

PUBPOL 590S
Bellamare, Marc UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Special Topics: Law, Development, & Human Rights
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 590S

This course is focused on challenges for poor people in which one of the questions is how large a role law should play in addressing the development challenge, and another question is whether or not to foreground legalized human rights as part of a strategy for pro-poor development. In the first (framing) part of the course we will explore arguments for nudging rather than fully mandating choices, considering how insights from popular behavioral economics might bear on policies to promote development with a minimum of legal rules. We will also learn about power analyses of development and such practitioner tools as power mapping, citizen report cards and public expenditure tracking surveys and consider the implications of these approaches to development for when and how law might best promote development. In the second (case module) part of the course we will take up three to four real world cases in which legal arguments, development problems, and ethical and human rights claims are all in play and policy decisions must be made, in that case, about what mix might be best for pro-poor development. Built into the case will be perspectives taken by different countries or communities, different stake-holders with different ideologies, and different disciplinary specialists. In each case module, we will ask if law, including legalized human rights, can be viewed both as part of the problem and as part of various prospective solutions. Also what other forms of nudging might help us innovate in relation to those problems. For each case module we will attend to ethical questions sometimes coded as grounded in human rights and sometimes not that arise in pursuit of pro-poor development. Case modules involve a range of development challenges, eg, safeguarding public health in the shadow of bilateral investment treaties or corporate constitutional rights; curbing corruption and empowering citizens and civil society to progressively achieve government accountability in such areas as health and education; enabling access to essential medicines for patients who cannot pay; promoting positive corporate conduct through devices like benefit corporations (b-corps) and restraining corporate complicity in human rights violations; maintaining social and environmental safeguards for World Bank- sponsored development initiatives. Students will have the opportunity to select and frame one of the cases. No expertise in law is required. We will learn as needed the rudiments of the relevant law for each case module, whether local, constitutional, national, international, or law-like institutional review processes like the World Bank's Inspection Panel that enables challenges to World Bank decisions. The strategic policy insights we seek will be of consequence for professional practitioners (eg. health workers, development workers) and government entities, as well as non-governmental organizations, citizen-based organizations and communities, corporations, transnational networks, and ordinary people.

PUBPOL 590S
Admay, Catherine UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
GHC: Ethics
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Special Topics: War and Public Health in Africa
Crosslisted as CULANTH 290 PUBPOL 290 GLHLTH 390

This course is an inquiry into the nature of contemporary war in sub-Saharan Africa and, in particular, into its human cost. It uses public health as a parameter to assess the impact of organized collective violence on people's lives. The link between war and public health will be established and, whenever reliable data is available, measured with respect to civilian deaths, gender based violence, physical and psychological trauma, mental disorders, malnutrition and famine, as well as the spread of epidemic diseases, inter alia HIV/AIDS. Special attention is given to rape as a weapon of war, to the trafficking of human beings in war zones, the child soldier phenomenon, and to death counts as a vector of humanitarian or political advocacy, e.g. in the DRC and Darfur. War in Africa also explores reverse causalities, both the assumption that ill health may be a contributing factor leading to armed conflict and the idea of health as a bridge to peace through the deployment of medical personnel, through medical diplomacy, truce days for vaccination, etc. The course draws on a variety of sources beyond academic writing, such as memoirs of child soldiers bush wives, war documentaries, journalistic reportage and fictional writing on war.

AAAS 390
Smith, Stephen UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Tropical Medicine - Costa Rica

Part of a 15-week semester abroad program in Costa Rica (through OTS). Integrates classroom and field instruction to introduce fundamental principles of tropical medicine and public health including the tropical environment and its related health issues

GLHLTH 383A
Was: GLHLTH 171
Staff UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Ungraded Research in Global Health

Individual research in a field of special interest, the central goal of which is a substantive paper containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Consent required.

GLHLTH 781
Was: GLHLTH 381
Woods, Chris GRAD Only FALL 2013 MSC: Thesis
US Environmental Policy
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 275

This course focuses on environmental policy issues
in the United States. We will consider the full range of the social sciences in our analysis, including the
political, economic, ethical, legal, and institutional issues involved in environmental decision-making. The
course will cover: the preservation and conservation movements, environmental priorities, the political
process, the formation of the EPA, the Clean Air Act, RCRA and superfund legislation, the Clean Water Act,
FIFRA, the Endangered Species Act, public lands policy, and institutional issues. The course is designed to
give students an understanding of the important conceptual issues in environmental policy-making, as well as an overview of current environmental legislation.

ENVIRON 212
Was: ENVIRON 149
Clark, James UG Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Virology and Viral Oncology MGM 552
Was: MGM 252
Cullen, Brian UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Wealth, Power and Inequality SOCIOL 211
Was: SOCIOL 111
Staff UG Only FALL 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
20th Century American Medicine HISTORY 370
Was: HISTORY 190A
English, Peter UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Advanced Demographic Methods

Mathematical methods and computer software for the analysis of population dynamics. Life table and stationary population theory; methods of life table estimation; multiple-decrement and multistate life tables; stationary population theory and its extensions; model life tables and stationary populations; two-sex models and interacting populations; hazard regression models, grade-of-membership analysis, and cohort studies.

SOCIOL 726S
Was: SOCIOL 216S
Land, Kenneth GRAD Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Methods
MSC: Elective
Aids and Other Emerging Diseases

Explores the interaction of biology and culture in creating and defining diseases through an investigation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and other emerging diseases: molecular biology; biology of transmission and infection; the role of people and culture in the evolution of infectious diseases; reasons for the geographic variations in disease. The inductive-deductive methodology of science is both used to develop and test hypotheses as well as examined itself as an analytical tool. Intended for nonmajors.

BIOLOGY 154
Was: BIOLOGY 46
Broverman, Sherryl UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Natural Science
Air Quality Management

Types, sources, effects of air pollutants. Regulatory framework emphasizing the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and federal, state, local agency implementation. Application of risk assessment, technology, market incentives to air management. Scientific, policy aspects of acid deposition, global climate change, indoor air, mobile sources control. Dispersion modeling, exposure assessment. Instructor: Vandenberg. 3 units.

ENVIRON 535
Was: ENVIRON 235
Vandenberg, John UG/GRAD FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
Anthropology and Global Health
Crosslisted as CULANTH 218S

Investigates connections between anthropology and global health. Readings based on ethnographic research conducted globally. Topics include cross-cultural experiences of epidemics, ethical implications of globalizing clinical trials, moral and political dimensions of health and humanitarian interventions, connections between nationalism and population policy, overlaps between traditional healing systems and public health programs, how gender ideologies shape reproductive health, and questions of identity, power, and ethics amidst global rollout of HIV therapies.

GLHLTH 220S
Was: GLHLTH
Solomon, Harris UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Culture, Policy & Action

Starting with the premise that ‘culture matters’, the course covers the impacts of values and attitudes, historical differences, religion, ethnicity, language, and regional identities to shape public policy, action and debate. It draws insights from various disciplines such as history, anthropology, sociology, economics, natural sciences, politics and religion. During the semester, we discuss approaches to value cultural diversity, culture relevant dilemmas in development, policy making by various actors in divided societies, and the cost of culture related difficulties.
Students enrolled in the course are expected to participate actively through class discussions/debates and presentations. There will be group presentations (2-3 persons to a group) made on selected themes during the course. A major paper on the topic presented is also required.

PUBPOL 790
Was: PUBPOL 388.08
Fernholz, Rosemary GRAD Only SPRING 2012 MSC: Elective
Current Issues in International and Development Economics

Issues of income distribution within and between countries, vehicles for growth, regional development, the role of politics in economic policy, multinational institutions. Cross-country and cross-time comparisons. Emphasis on individual research projects. Prerequisite: Economics 105D; and Economics 110D. Instructor: Tower

ECON 568S
Was: ECON 268S - 01
Tower, Edward UG/GRAD SPRING 2012
Design for the Developing World

Design of custom devices to help the specific and unique needs of developing world hospitals. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized; overview of developing world conditions, patent issues, engineering ethics.Oral and written reports will be required. Students may elect to personally deliver their projects to a developing world hospital, if selected, in the summer following the course. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 154L and Statistics 113. Consent of instructor required.

BME 462L
Was: BME 262
Malkin, Robert UG Only FALL 2012 GHC: Methods
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
GHC: Elective
Design for the Developing World

Design of custom devices to help the specific and unique needs of developing world hospitals. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized; overview of developing world conditions, patent issues, engineering ethics.Oral and written reports will be required. Students may elect to personally deliver their projects to a developing world hospital, if selected, in the summer following the course. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 154L and Statistics 113. Consent of instructor required.

BME 462L
Was: BME 262
Malkin, Robert UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Methods
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
GHC: Elective
Designing Innovation for Global Health

In this age of globalization, the expectations of life-saving technologies cross borders readily, but the introduction and adaptation of these technologies in resource-limited settings often lag behind. While we often think of technologies such as AIDS drugs, there are many appropriate technologies that are potentially transformative for improving local health--making water potable, cookstoves more efficient and less polluting, and diagnostics more available in local clinics. Behind each of these technologies, there are innovators, sometimes publicly funded researchers, other times private companies, often social entrepreneurs. In this course, students will critically examine the policy and philanthropic landscape behind these areas of appropriate technology. Beyond the engineering of these technologies, what is the social engineering of policies that minimize inequity? For example, is potable water best tackled with an innovation that serves the needs of an individual (e.g., Life Straw), a group (e.g., solar disinfectant system), or an entire community (e.g., chlorination of a local reservoir). Through the lens of these technologies, students will consider what factors help enable local innovation, from intellectual and financial capital to end-user input and systems for sharing and owning knowledge. What forms of philanthropy—from microcredit and giving circles to donor aid—work best to foster local innovation and to build local capacity? What are the ethical issues involved in introducing technologies, from double standards in quality to donor-recipient relationships? This course seeks to prepare those engaged in such work to consider the policy ramifications of designing innovation for global health.

PUBPOL 642S
Was: PUBPOL 213
So, Anthony UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Devices For People With Disabilities

Design of custom devices to aid disabled individuals. Students will be paired with health care professionals at local hospitals who will supervise the development of projects for specific clients. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized; overview of assistive technologies, patent issues, engineering ethics. Oral and written reports will be required. Selected projects may be continued as independent study. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 154L and Statistics 113. Consent of instructor required. Design of custom devices to aid disabled individuals. Students will be paired with health care professionals at local hospitals who will supervise the development of projects for specific clients. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized; overview of assistive technologies, patent issues, engineering ethics. Oral and written reports will be required. Selected projects may be continued as independent study. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 354L and Statistical Science 130. Service Learning Course.

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC ELECTIVE. Counts as Elective only if taken prior to Fall 2009.
BME 460L
Was: BME 260
Bohs, Laurence UG Only FALL 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Economic Analysis for Environment and Public Health
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 607 GLHLTH 531
ENVIRON 563
Was: ENVIRON 263
Jeuland, Marc UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Economic Growth and Development Policy

Basic principles and policy issues in the study of economic growth and development. The roles of physical, natural and human capital, technological innovation, productivity improvements and institutions in explaining patterns andncauses of variations in growth and development performance of countries. Effects on growth and development of many current policy issues including HIV-AIDs, financial crises, foreign aid and investment, debt burdens and forgiveness, corruption and governance. Prerequisite: Public Policy Studies 302.

PUBPOL 598
Fernholz, UG/GRAD FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
Environment, Health and Development in China

Critical overview and investigation of the culture, politics, and political economy of environment, health, and development issues in contemporary China, with special attention to case studies exploring a range of issues from public health panics, HIV and AIDS, sex work, migrant workers, the Beijing Olympics, water politics, earthquake relief, and environmental protest. Includes readings across disciplines, and engagement with the work of government, academic, multilateral and non-governmental groups. Instructor consent required. Course taught in China as part of the Global Study Abroad Program.

Course Notes
Course is a part of the Global Semester Abroad program.
GLHLTH 383AS
Was: GLHLTH 173S
Litzinger, Ralph UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Environmental Chemisty and Toxicology

An overview of the fate, transport
and biological effects of chemicals in the environment. Four types of chemicals that archetypical of environmental
pollutants will be discussed, including polar and non-polar organic compounds; such as insecticides and
pesticides; oxidants; and metals. Topics include characterization of pollutants, the chemistry of natural
waters, soils and atmosphere; chemical transport between compartments; chemical and biological transformation;
and the ecological, toxicological, and molecular biological responses associated with chemical exposure. Case studies will be incorporated that focus on the impact of chemical pollutants on large-scale ecosystems and human health.

ENVIRON 360
Was: ENVIRON 160
Stapleton, Heather UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Environmental Toxicology

Study of environmental contaminants from a broad perspective encompassing biochemical, ecological, and toxicological principles and methodologies. Discussion of sources, environmental transport and transformation phenomena, accumulation in biota and ecosystems. Impacts at various levels of organization, particularly biochemical and physiological effects. Prerequisites: organic chemistry and vertebrate physiology or consent of instructor. Instructor: Di Giulio. 3 units.

ENVIRON 501
Was: ENVIRON 212
Meyer, Joel UG/GRAD FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
Ethics For Global Health Research

This course will present an overview of practical and theoretical approaches to bioethics from a range of perspectives, including the humanities, law, philosophy, medicine and science. Students will apply various resources, terminology and frameworks to case studies which will prepare them for their own research. The course will include IRB and responsible conduct of research. (2 credits)

GLHLTH 740
Was: GLHLTH 330
Hawkins, Jennifer Sreenivasan, Gopal McKinney, Ross GRAD Only SPRING 2012 MSC: Core
Fieldwork Methods: Cultural Analysis And Interpretation

Anthropology as a discipline (a field of study) and the site where anthropologists work: the field. Combines theories of anthropological fieldwork methods with practice, including participation, observation, and interviews. Students undertake original research in a local fieldsite of their choice and produce their own mini-ethnography.

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC METHODS OR ELECTIVE. Counts as METHODS OR Elective only if taken prior to Fall 2009.
CULANTH 302
Was: CULANTH 194
Mathers, Katherine UG Only FALL 2012
Fieldwork Methods: Cultural Analysis And Interpretation

Anthropology as a discipline (a field of study) and the site where anthropologists work: the field. Combines theories of anthropological fieldwork methods with practice, including participation, observation, and interviews. Students undertake original research in a local fieldsite of their choice and produce their own mini-ethnography.

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC METHODS OR ELECTIVE. Counts as METHODS OR Elective only if taken prior to Fall 2009.
CULANTH 302
Was: CULANTH 194
Byerly, Ingrid UG Only SPRING 2012
Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis

Fundamental aspects of geographic information systems and satellite remote sensing for environmental applications. Covers concepts of geographic data development, cartography, image processing, and spatial analysis. Gateway into more advanced training in geospatial analysis curriculum. Consent of instructor required.

ENVIRON 559/559L
Halpin/Harrell, UG/GRAD FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
Gender, Poverty, and Health
Crosslisted as SOCIOL 212

This course will examine the interconnections among gender, poverty, and health. It will adopt a global perspective on these issues, with a focus on low- and middle-income countries as well as the United States. We will learn that health has more to do with social location than with biology; it is something that is enjoyed by the privileged and struggled for by the socially marginalized. Further, among the most important social determinants of health are gender, race and class, and it is very challenging to disentangle their respective effects. They help shape vulnerability to disease and poor health outcomes. They help explain access to care as well as the consequences of illness and disease. They help account for what we consider to be health problems in the first place. And, they must be addressed if efforts to promote health are to be successful in the long term.

GLHLTH 212
Was: GLHLTH 112
Messer, Lynne UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MAJOR: Foundations – Social Determinants
Genomic Perspectives on Human Evolution

Human evolutionary history as studied from the perspective of the genome. Nature of contemporary genomic data and how they are interpreted in the context of the fossil record, comparative anatomy, psychology, and cultural studies. Examination of both the origin of modern humans as a distinct species and subsequent migration across the world. Emphasis on language, behavior, and disease susceptibility as traits of particular evolutionary interest. Prerequisite: Biology 118 or equivalent course. Instructor: Wray

BIOLOGY 554
Was: BIOLOGY 274-01
Wray, Gregory UG/GRAD FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
Global Diseases-Focus Only

Biological, social, and cultural factors impacting global disease spread and/or reduction; current challenges in vaccination and disease control programs; Open only to students in the Focus Program.

Students will evaluate the factors - biological, social, and cultural – that impact how diseases spread through populations, and that makes them easier or harder to control. How can we use what we’ve learned from past attempts at disease elimination to improve current programs? Students will learn the biology of major global diseases caused by a range of pathogens, including TB, malaria, and smallpox. These diseases will be used as case studies to address the evolution and ecology of disease; antibiotic resistance; vaccine development and immunization programs; and tropical diseases versus diseases of poverty. Other potential topics include polio, influenza, SARS and HIV. Biological, social, and cultural factors impacting global disease spread and/or reduction; current challenges in vaccination and disease control programs; Open only to students in the Focus Program.

Students will evaluate the factors - biological, social, and cultural – that impact how diseases spread through populations, and that makes them easier or harder to control. How can we use what we’ve learned from past attempts at disease elimination to improve current programs? Students will learn the biology of major global diseases caused by a range of pathogens, including TB, malaria, and smallpox. These diseases will be used as case studies to address the evolution and ecology of disease; antibiotic resistance; vaccine development and immunization programs; and tropical diseases versus diseases of poverty. Other potential topics include polio, influenza, SARS and HIV.

BIOLOGY 180FS
Was: BIOLOGY 92FCS
Broverman, Sherryl UG Only FALL 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Environmental Health: Economics and Policy
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 582 GLHLTH 538

Social science perspective on global environmental health. Students will learn to identify primary environmental causes of high burden diseases such as malaria, diarrhea, and respiratory infections; describe how to measure socio-economic impacts of global environmental health diseases; discuss key policies to control global environmental health problems based on private prevention and therapeutic behaviors; and propose frameworks to empirically monitor and evaluate global environmental health policies. A sub-module will focus on climate change and water-borne diseases. Prerequisites: Intro course in statistics.

ENVIRON 538
Was: ENVIRON 238
Pattanayak, Subhrendu UG/GRAD FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
Global Health and International Development in the Nonprofit Sector

Explore issues of global health and international development work in the non-profit sector. Topics include, delivery of culturally appropriate global health assistance to low resource countries, challenges in working in developing countries, different approaches to development work, management principles of non-governmental organizations (NGO's), and monitoring and evaluation of global health program outcomes. Topics will be explored through lecture, discussion and small group work. Final class presentation and paper will focus on developing a case study centered on a select global health problem and the non-profit organization(s) approach to delivering health care solutions.

GLHLTH 351
Was: GLHLTH 166
Walmer, Katherine UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Health Capstone

Capstone Course for students in Global Health Certificate. Group analysis of a current global health problem/issue. Project involves background research, data acquisition, analysis, writing, and presentation of a substantial research paper/report at an advanced level. Consent of instructor required.

Course Notes
Course number was GLHLTH 255S prior to spring 2010. Course is no longer offered as a seminar.
GLHLTH 501
Was: GLHLTH 255
Boyd, David Clements, Dennis UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 GHC: Capstone
MAJOR: Senior Seminar
Global Health Challenges

Course introduces major global health problems and social, behavioral, economic, biomedical and environmental determinants of health in resource limited settings. Topics include communicable diseases i.e. HIV, malaria, tuberculosis and common childhood diseases; chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and mental health; and determinants of health associated with these diseases, such as poverty, gender imbalance, culture, poor environmental sanitation, malnutrition, tobacco use, and climate change. Other topics may include health promotion, reproductive health, maternal and child health, and disaster preparedness.

GLHLTH 701
Was: GLHLTH 310
Woods, Chris GRAD Only FALL 2012 MSC: Core
Global Health Issues in South Africa - Summer 2012

Integrates classroom & field instruction, introduce students to the fundamental principles of public health in South Africa. Focus on three major themes: primary health care in South Africa, the impact of HIV/AIDS & the role of traditional healers. An emerging third world economy, South Africa is characterized by a blend of first & third world societies, & is an ideal location to study the dynamics of the three major themes in deep rural, peri-urban & urban communities. Lectures & field trips; Ethical debates on controversy surrounding management & treatment of AIDS in RSA & role of traditional healers in mainstream medicine; Independent research. Part of the OTS program in South Africa.

Course Notes
Number as of Aug 2012 will be 382A
GLHLTH 173
Was: GLHLTH 173
Müller, Alex UG Only Summer 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Health Policy and Policy Making

Introduction to essential global health policy concepts, understanding of global health policy-making, how policies affect reality on the ground in global health and development. Build critical analytical skills and the ability to translate coursework into broader understanding of policies and policy-making. Includes lectures, analysis, discussion, readings, case studies. Open to juniors, seniors, and Master's students pursuing GH certificate or public policy, MSc in GH, SOM third year. Department consent required.

GLHLTH 570
Was: GLHLTH 222
Miller, Michael UG/GRAD FALL 2012 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Policy
Global Health Research: Design and Practice

Course provides a foundation in study design, research question development, field implementation, measurement, validity and reliability. Quantitative and qualitative research approaches are examined. Students build critical skills in reading, interpreting and synthesizing scientific literature. The selection of appropriate measurements and survey development is emphasized and issues in field implementation explored.

GLHLTH 702
Was: GLHLTH 321
Prudhomme - O'Meara, Wendy Read, Jen'nan GRAD Only FALL 2012 MSC: Core
Global Health Research: Epidemiologic Methods II

Course builds on Epidemiologic Methods I to present advanced topics in epidemiology. Topics include review of study designs including meta-analysis; intensive study of bias, including confounding, selection bias, and misclassification; missing data; sensitivity analysis; topics in regression analysis; and an introduction to the analysis of time to event data, including lifetable methods, survival curves, and Cox proportional hazards regression. Discussions of causal inference and how to read, review, and write scientific literature. Course has a weekly data analysis lab section to develop programming and statistical analysis skills. Prerequisite: Epidemiologic Methods I or equivalent. Course builds on Epidemiologic Methods I to present advanced topics in epidemiology. Topics include review of study designs including meta-analysis; intensive study of bias, including confounding, selection bias, and misclassification; missing data; sensitivity analysis; topics in regression analysis; and an introduction to the analysis of time to event data, including lifetable methods, survival curves, and Cox proportional hazards regression. Discussions of causal inference and how to read, review, and write scientific literature. Course has a weekly data analysis lab section to develop programming and statistical analysis skills. Prerequisite: Epidemiologic Methods I or equivalent.

GLHLTH 706
Was: GLHLTH 325
Westreich, Daniel GRAD Only SPRING 2012 MSC: Elective
Global Health Special Topics Global Health, Law, and Technology - Summer 2012
Crosslisted as CULANTH 290S

This course considers how law and technology together affect the types of health services available to people in different parts of the world. It examines the role of international organizations and treaties, national legal systems, global business, and NGOs in the global governance of healthcare. Students study the development and use of medicines and other healthcare technology. Classes discuss how law regulates the innovation of healthcare technology and access to its benefits and risks. The course also investigates how culture affects attitudes toward law and technology in healthcare. Topics include the following: international health diplomacy; NGO business models; public and private medical R&D; intellectual property and innovation; how international trade and investment affects access to medicines and environmental health; new uses of information and communication technologies for global health; crisis response healthcare; different ways health systems implement constitutional rights to healthcare; and how technology and law together affect the emphasis of different health systems (e.g. high-tech specialist care, primary care, traditional medicine, and/or preventive public health).nnStudents will meet diverse actors in global health law and technology via guest speakers and videoconferences with professionals in the field. Grading will be based on class participation, several small group exercises and a final project.

GLHLTH 390S
Was: GLHLTH 180S
Cross, Jason UG Only Summer 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Health Special Topics-Ethics Global Health and Human Rights - Summer 2012
Crosslisted as CULANTH 290

Topics vary depending on semester and section. Topics may include: global health ethics, field methods, health technologies, rapid needs assessment, and global health policies. This course examines philosophies, institutions, practices and professional cultures of global health and human rights, with an emphasis on instances where the two overlap. It considers claims that health is a human right and relationships between health and other human rights. Students study social movement organizing that has expanded access to healthcare worldwide and turned claims that health is a human right into policy. Topics include the following: philosophy of health and human rights; health social movements; community and social movement organizing strategy; NGOs; global health and war; refugees; humanitarian organizations such as Doctors Without Borders and the Red Cross/Red Crescent; comparative political economy of healthcare policy; health disparities; culture and health; gender and health; health and democracy; alternative ethical and policy frameworks to human rights; and relationships between health and other environmental and social justice movements.nnStudents will meet global health and human rights professionals via guest speakers and videoconferences. Grading will be based on class participation, several small group exercises and a final project.

GLHLTH 390S
Was: GLHLTH 180S
Cross, Jason UG Only Summer 2012 GHC: Elective
GHC: Ethics
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Health Special Topics-Ethics Global Health Service, Research, & Ethics

Topics vary depending on semester and section. Topics may include: global health ethics, field methods, health technologies, rapid needs assessment, and global health policies. Students will be exposed to ethical and human rights concepts as they relate to global health and explore how to understand and engage in ethical health service, intervention, research and education. Introduces current issues encountered in health ethics and requires students to analyze and critique the ethical choices individuals, policy-makers and health workers make. Students think creatively about the relationship between ethics and health, explore solutions to different ethical situations and analyze the application of solutions to the world context. By engaging in service activities during the course, students will be better able to understand how an intellectual/rational approach to ethics can be both enhanced as well as counteracted by the emotional impact that engaging in service often offers. The course will explore differential standards of care, access to care, best outcomes vs. distributed justice and will focus on ethical issues related to at least 3 distinct GH topics: Infectious Diseases; Obesity, Alcohol and Tobacco; and Environmental Health. Course involves service engagements with community partners from each of these three topics. Students will use the experiences they gain from service and related case studies, to reflect on how to approach ethical dilemmas and appropriate rationales for options to resolve them. NOTE: This is a Service Learning course

GLHLTH 390S
Was: GLHLTH 180S
Ariely, Sumedha UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
GHC: Ethics
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Mental Health GLHLTH 660
Was: GLHLTH 223S
Maselko, Joanna UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 MSC: Elective
Global Nutrition: Over and Under Nutrition in Developing Countries

Discusses the nutrition problems of developing countries. Reviews epidemiological, biological, and behavioral consequences of both overnutrition (e.g., obesity) and undernutrition (e.g., malnutrition). Emphasizes infectious disease (HIV, TB, malaria, diarrhea) of children and perinatal outcomes (e.g., fetal loss, low birth weight, HIV transmission, pre-eclampsia) of women and children. Strong focus on ethical and political issues relevant to the formulation of nutrition policy and programs in developing countries. Course is designed for graduate students or advanced undergraduates.

GLHLTH 670S
Was: GLHLTH 220S - 01
Benjamin Neelon, Sara UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Globalization and Governance

Seminar explores economic, political, and social aspects of globalization and their implications for public policy making in the twenty-first century. Focus on issues of governance, particularly international cooperation, the design of international organizations, and the role of international NGOs. Policy areas include international trade and finance, environment, security, human rights, media and communications, and international development.

PUBPOL 820
Was: PUBPOL 320
Johnson, Tana GRAD Only FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Provides the student the opportunity to incorporate health promotion and disease prevention assessment and intervention into the health of clients across the life span. Applying the principles of health education, the course prepares students to use the tools and skills necessary to provide health promotion and disease
prevention services to individuals, families, groups, and communities. The definition of health and the factors that impact an individual's or group's health framework is the basis for understanding health maintenance interventions. 3 credits.

NURSING 502
Was: NURSING 502
Reiner, Isaac Lipkus UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 MSC: Elective
Health Systems in Developing Countries

This course introduces students to key challenges faced in strengthening of health systems in low and middle income countries. The course will cover a diverse set of topics including an overview of organization of health systems, models of purchasing and providing health care, innovations in financing health care, and issues in service delivery such as quality of care and human resource challenges. Students will learn frameworks and methods employed in the evaluation of health systems. The course will also draw attention to resource allocation problems and various frameworks used to address them. The course will primarily rely on readings from a variety of health policy, economics and other social science journals.

GLHLTH 750
Was: GLHLTH 340
Mohanan, Manoj GRAD Only SPRING 2012 MSC: Core
Health, Culture and the Latino Community

Issues associated with access to the health care industry for growing Latino/a population in the US. Topics: cultural competency issues, medical practices, lexical knowledge related to the field. Develop research proposal informed by required 20 hours of service work with local community partners. Assessment on knowledge of content, oral and written Spanish, and participation in service. Recommended students take 100-level Spanish course prior to enrolling. Pre-requisite: Spanish 76 or equivalent.

SPANISH 306
Was: SPANISH 106A
Staff UG Only FALL 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
History of Public Health in America HISTORY 369
Was: HISTORY 189B
Humphreys, Margaret UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Social Determinants
Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment

Topics central to both health and ecological risk assessment are explored. Basic concepts of hazard identification, dose response relationships, exposure assessment, and risk characterization and
communication are discussed in the context of both human health and environmental assessment. The basis and rationale for using specific, as well as extrapolated, scientific information and expert judgment, and the strengths and weaknesses of alternative approaches, are evaluated. Applications emphasizing real cases are used to illustrate the interdisciplinary process and products of risk assessment, as well as the regulatory use of the information. Group projects emphasized. Instructors: Mihaich and McMasters. 3 units

Course Notes
Counts as Methods for students matriculating in or before fall 2009.
ENVIRON 539
Was: ENVIRON 239
Staff UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 GHC: Methods
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
Implementation Research and Health

Implementation Research/Operational Research (IR/OR) studies how to improve uptake, implementation, and translation of research findings into routine and common practices ('know-do' or 'evidence to program' gap); moves results from effectiveness studies and efficacy trials to real-world settings, obtaining information to guide scale-up; helps implementers apply lessons from a program in one context to developing a similar program in a similar environment. Course covers: framework of IR/OR; methods of identifying program implementation problems; how to organize and develop an IR/OR proposal; main study design, research methods, data collection and analysis used in IR/OR; approaches to capacity building for IR/OR in developing countries.

GLHLTH 751
Was: GLHLTH 350
Tang, Shenglan GRAD Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Independent Study in Global Health

Individual non-research directed study in a field of special interest on a previously approved topic, under the supervision of a faculty member, resulting in a significant academic product. Open only to qualified juniors and seniors by consent of instructor and director of Global Health Certificate program.

GLHLTH 391
Was: GLHLTH 195
Staff UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Indigenous Peoples, Human Rights & Development

This seminar focuses on indigenous peoples, their basic rights, and their roles in national and international development processes. Through class discussions, case studies and role-playing, students will examine the impact of national policies and global trends on indigenous populations and vice versa, and the dynamics of conflict generation and resolution. Among the issues to be discussed are notions of sovereignty and governance, land and other property rights, community management of natural resources, indigenous social movements, international networks and assistance, culture, access and survival.

PUBPOL 790
Was: PUBPOL 388.07
Fernholz, Rosemary GRAD Only SPRING 2012
Innovation and Policy Entrepreneurship

This course will analyze a sampling of innovative policies and programs that were initiated to solve major problems in developed and developing countries. Some of the approaches worked; some did not. All of them, however, challenged conventional thinking, hence the title of the course ‘innovative policies’. During the semester we will discuss the following issues: crisis, innovation and policy space, leadership, transformation and transitions, innovation from within and from without, sectoral opportunity, unintended consequences, and the dynamics of decision making for innovative policies. Among the examples we will discuss are the Marshall Plan in Europe, the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, Thailand’s approach to Family Planning, and the start of major civic volunteerism in the United States. The course will use the case approach. Each week, we will discuss a policy or set of policies. Students enrolled in the course will be asked to join a group (2-3) to discuss, analyze and present the cases. They are expected to develop a case and present it. We will also have films that highlight some aspect of a case.

PUBPOL 726
Was: PUBPOL 383G.01
Fernholz, GRAD Only SPRING 2012 MSC: Elective
Integrated Environmental Design

Student design teams complete a preliminary design of an actual environmental engineering project and present the design to a panel of civil engineering faculty and practitioners. A written technical report is required. Topics to be addressed include: the design process; cost estimation; legal, ethical, and social aspects of professional engineering practice; short-term and long-term design serviceability considerations. Open only to civil engineering students during their final two semesters. Prerequisites: Civil Engineering 120L, 123L, 124L.

CE 469
Was: CE 193
Schaad, David UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Methods
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
GHC: Elective
International Law and Global Health
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 190FS

Introductory and basic topics in public policy. Topics vary each semester. Does not count for public policy studies major. Open only to students in the Focus Program.

Course Notes
Focus Course. Course was approved for the ethics requirement if taken before Fall 2009.
CULANTH 190FS
Was: CULANTH 80FCS
Admay, Catherine UG Only FALL 2012 GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
Introduction to Epidemiology: Focus on Global Health

Introduces students to the main concepts and methods used in population-based epidemiology research. Topics covered include measures of disease frequency, study design, measures of association, and problems of bias, especially as they pertain to global health research. Students will learn to understand and evaluate epidemiological studies. A prior quantitative course is highly recommended.

GLHLTH 362
Was: GLHLTH 161
Maselko, Joanna UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Introduction to Global Health
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 161

Introduction to multidisciplinary theories and techniques for assessing and addressing global, infectious, chronic, and behavioral health problems. Global health issues addressed from perspectives such as: epidemiology, biology, engineering, environment, business, human rights, nursing, psychology, law, public policy, and economics.

Course Notes
Course titled as "Multidisciplinary Approaches to Global Health" prior to fall 2012.
PUBPOL 166
Was: PUBPOL 154
Whetten, Kathryn UG Only FALL 2012 GHC: Intro
MINOR: Fundamentals
MAJOR: Core – Fundamentals
Introductory Demographic Measures and Concepts
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 532S

This is an introductory course in demographic concepts, measures and techniques. The primary objective is to learn how demographers measure population change, mortality, morbidity, fertility, marriage, divorce, and migration. The course also illustrates the broader application of demographic measurement and techniques to other aspects of society and population health, such as educational attainment, labor force participation, linkages between mortality, morbidity and disability, and health and mortality differentials. The understanding of the materials is aided by a series of problem sets which are designed to help students learn to apply demographic methods.

GLHLTH 530S
Was: GLHLTH 250
Merli, Maria-Giovanna UG/GRAD FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Social Determinants
MINOR: Elective
Microbial Ecology and Evolution

Survey of new advances in the field of environmental and evolutionary microbiology, based on current literature, discussion, and laboratory exercises. Topics to include bacterial phylogeny, molecular ecology, emerging infectious diseases, bacterial symbiosis, experimental evolution, evolution of drug resistance, and microbial genomics. Prerequisite: Biology 25L, 103L, 118, or consent of instructor. Instructor: Vilgalys. 4 units.

BIOLOGY 557L
Was: BIOLOGY 211L
Staff UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 MSC: Elective
Microbial Pathogenesis

Modern molecular genetic approaches to understanding the pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Underlying mechanisms of pathogenesis and host-parasite relationships that contribute to the infectious disease process.

MGM 582
Was: MGM 282
McCusker, John UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Microeconomics of International Development Policy

Microeconomic foundations of international development policy using tools of microeconomics to study behavior of individuals, households, and firms in developing countries. Topics may include household and intrahousehold modeling; market participation; agrarian contracts; credit and microfinance; nutrition and health; poverty traps; etc. Public Policy Studies 303D prerequisite or instructor approval.

PUBPOL 630S
Krishna, Anirudh UG/GRAD FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
Monitoring and Evaluation

This course takes a critical look at the range of issues and challenges typical in program M&E, with a strong focus on international development programs or projects. Students will develop or strengthen key program design and management skills for stronger results and demonstrated impact. Hands-on practical assignments will draw on material presented, your own experience, and class discussions to test your ideas and constructively challenge others. Half of the class grade depends on a group or individual project (M&E design and case study).nRequirements: Experience in international development programs, comparable practical exposure to real-world low-resource political economies, or professors approval. Logic or philosophy of science, and social science analytical methods. Instructor consent required.

PUBPOL 728
Elkins, Catherine GRAD Only FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
Nation, Region and Global Economy

The changing configuration of global capitalism, with emphasis on comparing global regions of North America, Latin America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. The internal dynamics of these regions, including the development strategies of selected nations, interregional comparisons (for example, regional divisions of labor, state-society relationships, the nature of their business systems, quality of life issues). Research paper required.

SOCIOL 345
Was: SOCIOL 145
Hovsepian, Mary UG Only FALL 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Nation, Region and Global Economy

The changing configuration of global capitalism, with emphasis on comparing global regions of North America, Latin America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. The internal dynamics of these regions, including the development strategies of selected nations, interregional comparisons (for example, regional divisions of labor, state-society relationships, the nature of their business systems, quality of life issues). Research paper required.

SOCIOL 345
Was: SOCIOL 145
Denniston, Ryan UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Natural Catastrophes: Rebuilding The Ruins

Research Service Learning Gateway course where students will conduct a life cycle analysis of natural disasters. Invited experts will discuss meteorologic, hydrologic and geologic factors that cause disasters; explore how societies plan and/or respond to the immediate and long-term physical, social, emotional and spiritual issues associated with survival; and present case studies of response, recovery and reconstruction efforts. Students will attend the lecture component of the course and complete on-line quizzes to demonstrate understanding of the material presented. For the service learning experience, students will carry out response activities over Spring Break in an area ravaged by a natural disaster. They will keep a journal (audio and written) of their activities, write a brief synopsis (4-5 pages), and make a group oral presentation of their findings following their return. They will also submit a hypothetical research proposal for a project which might stem from the course and their experiences.

ENVIRON 262
Was: ENVIRON 162
Staff UG Only FALL 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Politics of International Aid in Low-Income Countries

The effectiveness of aid in low-income countries has been the subject of intense debate.The course will examine the context and objectives of international aid, the record and lessons, and recent efforts and proposals for change within the international community. There is a special (but not exclusive) focus on Africa, since more robust growth and poverty reduction on that continent are at the center of the aidneffectiveness debate. In this exploration of the politics of aid, attention will be focused on the principal stakeholders, their motivations, and the quality of interaction among the various players (Governments, NGOs, bilateral donors, and multilateral institutions), along with the bottom line whether aid is resulting in poverty reduction in low income countries. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with recent literature on the topic, key debates surrounding aid effectiveness, the policies and actions of different donors, and recent proposals and measures aimed at improving development assistance. The course is primarily a group discussion, with occasional mini-lectures, student presentations, debates, case studies, two papers, and a final simulation.

PUBPOL 724
Was: PUBPOL 383E.01
Pomerantz, Phyllis GRAD Only SPRING 2012 MSC: Elective
Population Aging, Family, and Policy in the East and West

This course covers policy issues of modern aging societies, with special emphases on families and comparisons between Western countries and Asian countries. To tackle the complex issues, we discuss both relevant theories and empirical evidence from various disciplines including sociology, economics, public health, and human biology. The first module introduces demography, investigating the underlying causes of population aging and presenting trends in population age distributions around the globe. In the second module, we review public old-age support programs in the East and West and discuss their challenges. The module also describes policy options to mitigate the consequences of population aging, and assesses the effectiveness of the policies from the comparative perspective. The third module examines why families provide elder support, how the support differs across societies and cultures, and how public and private old-age provisions are interrelated.

PUBPOL 290
Was: PUBPOL 195.14
Kim, Erin UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Population and Environmental Dynamics and Human Health

Course examines population, health and environment (PHE) dynamics with focus on interactions in developing or transition economies. Theoretical and empirical approaches governing PHE dynamics from multidisciplinary perspectives, including geography, public health/epidemiology, demography, and economics. Students will obtain experience in design and analysis of PHE studies, and epidemiology of vector-born, chronic and enteric infections.

GLHLTH 637S
Was: GLHLTH 237S
Pan, William UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 MSC: Elective
Quantitative Method I

Course introduces principles of epidemiology, including disease frequency measures; measures of association; observational, experimental, and quasi-experimental study designs; validity -- confounding, selection bias, measurement error; reliability. Course interweaves introductory biostatistics for continuous and categorical variables. Course has a data analysis lab section in which students walk through a guided data analysis on a provided data set, such as Demographic and Health Surveys.

GLHLTH 705
Was: GLHLTH 320
Pence, Brian GRAD Only FALL 2012 MSC: Core
Race, Genomics, and Society

Integrated analysis of historical and contemporary aspects of `race and genetics/genomics'. Focus on relevant applications in science, medicine, and society; develop skills required for scientific, sociopolitical, cultural, psychosocial, and ethical evaluation of issues. Topics include: introduction to population genetics/genetic variation; concepts and definitions of race; overview of bioethics; social and political history of race; genomics and health disparities; race, ancestry, and medical practice; genealogy, genetic ancestry, and identity; public perceptions of race and genetics/genomics. Instructor: Royal

GENOME 258S
Was: GENOME 158S.03
Royal, Charmaine UG Only FALL 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Research Independent Study in Global Health

Individual research-oriented directed study in a field of special interest on a previously approved topic, under the supervision of a faculty member, resulting in a significant academic product. Open only to qualified juniors and seniors by consent of instructor and director of Global Health Certificate program.

GLHLTH 393
Was: GLHLTH 196
Broverman, Sherryl UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Research Methods in Global Health
Crosslisted as PSY 309

Introduction to methodological techniques used in global health research, including qualitative field work, quantitative surveys, experimental designs, intervention trials, and program evaluation. Teaches strengths and weaknesses of each method, and how to determine the most appropriate method for specific research questions. Takes a problem-based approach, emphasizing the interdisciplinary nature of global health research. Focuses on how to evaluate published & unpublished research and how to design a global health research project. Skills include: identification of global health problems, conceptualization of a research question, designing a research study, and interpretation of results.

Course Notes
For students who matriculated at Duke in Fall 2009 or later, this is the only Methods course approved for the GHC. Students who matriculated at Duke prior to Fall 2009 will have had other options to fulfill the GHC Methods requirement.
GLHLTH 371
Was: GLHLTH 163
Ariely, Sumedha UG Only FALL 2012 GHC: Methods
GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Core – Research
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Research Methods in Global Health
Crosslisted as PSY 309

Introduction to methodological techniques used in global health research, including qualitative field work, quantitative surveys, experimental designs, intervention trials, and program evaluation. Teaches strengths and weaknesses of each method, and how to determine the most appropriate method for specific research questions. Takes a problem-based approach, emphasizing the interdisciplinary nature of global health research. Focuses on how to evaluate published & unpublished research and how to design a global health research project. Skills include: identification of global health problems, conceptualization of a research question, designing a research study, and interpretation of results.

Course Notes
For students who matriculated at Duke in Fall 2009 or later, this is the only Methods course approved for the GHC. Students who matriculated at Duke prior to Fall 2009 will have had other options to fulfill the GHC Methods requirement.
GLHLTH 371
Was: GLHLTH 163
Meade, Christina UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Methods
GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Core – Research
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Research Methods in Health/Clinical Psychology

No course description available

PSY 306
Was: PSY 185C
Blumenthal, James UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Methods
GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Research Practicum- Costa Rica

Introduces students to research design, field methods, and basic data analysis in a tropical context. Skills include hypothesis testing and statistical analysis, orientation to basic software packages, write and present scientific papers, and design and conduct epidemiologic research.

Course Notes
Course taught as part of the Costa Rica-Global Health study abroad program offered through OTS.
GLHLTH 380A
Was: GLHLTH 172
Benavides Rawson, Jorge UG Only FALL 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Research Practicum- Costa Rica

Introduces students to research design, field methods, and basic data analysis in a tropical context. Skills include hypothesis testing and statistical analysis, orientation to basic software packages, write and present scientific papers, and design and conduct epidemiologic research.

Course Notes
Course taught as part of the Costa Rica-Global Health study abroad program offered through OTS.
GLHLTH 380A
Was: GLHLTH 172
Staff UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Resource Environmental Policy/environmental Politics
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 577

Environmental policy
formation and implementation in comparative perspective. Topics include interest groups, environmental movements
and parties, public opinion, political systems and institutions. Case students selected from the United States and other advanced industrialized countries and the developing world. Spring.

ENVIRON 577
Was: ENVIRON 274
Albright, Elizabeth UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Responsible Genomics

Survey of ethical, social, economic, and legal issues in genomics. Introduction to ethical reasoning and examination of selected issues calling for such analysis, including: special procedures for research involving human participants, (2) respect for privacy and confidentiality of genetic information; (3) historical and political background of health research funding, and (4) public-private research interactions such as intellectual property and conflict of interest. Instructor: Cook-Deegan. 3 units. (Also counts as a policy elective.)

PUBPOL 634
Was: PUBPOL 240
Cook-Deegan, Robert UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 MSC: Elective
Science and Politics of Natural Catastophes
Crosslisted as EGR 260 ENVIRON 260

In this interdisciplinary course students will conduct a life cycle analysis of a natural disaster. Invited experts will discuss meteorologic, hydrologic and geologic factors that cause disasters; explore how societies plan for and/or respond to the immediate and long-term physical, social, emotional and spiritual issues associated with survival; and present case studies of response, recovery and reconstruction efforts. Students will attend the lecture component of the course and complete on-line quizzes to demonstrate understanding of the material presented. Additionally, they will prepare on individual paper (~ 10 pages) on a relevant topic and one group paper, the results of which will be presented to the class.

PUBPOL 276
Was: PUBPOL 107
Schaad, David UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Social Change, Markets, and Economy in China

Introduction to recent economic, social, and institutional changes in China, with focus on recent (post 1980) periods. Up-to-date descriptive reviews, empirical data, and discussions on historical background, current status, and future perspectives. Instructor: Yi

ECON 542S
Was: ECON 269S - 05
Yi, Zeng UG/GRAD SPRING 2012
Social Determinants of U.S. Health Disparities
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 340

Introduction to how social factors influence health and well-being, with a particular focus on contemporary U.S. society. Topics include obesity, aging, socioeconomic disadvantage, access to health insurance, public health systems, the role of the media, and racial/ethnic and gender inequalities. The course will provide descriptive assessments of health inequalities and analytic examinations of the mechanisms through which social factors affect health.

SOCIOL 361
Was: SOCIOL 161
Read, Jen'nan UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Social Determinants
Special Topics Economics of Global Health
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 390S ECON 690

Course in applied economics examining health issues in developing countries from the standpoint of applied microeconomic research. Specific topics: identifying effect of health on growth/development and reciprocal relationships between income, poverty & health. Discuss structural problems in delivery/provider quality, challenges of healthcare financing, and tension between adopting "high-tech" care while delivering basic care to others. Attention on issues of poverty alleviation & promise of foreign-aid, at heart of debates about healthcare in developing countries. Examine empirical evidence in support of interventions affecting health including success and failure of interventions that target infant mortality; diarrhea, worms; AIDS; and malaria. Where there is a paucity of evidence in a developing country context, will uses lessons from American experience. Pre-reqs: Econ 201 or PPS 303 and Econ 208 or PPS 604, or instructor consent.

ECON 390S
Was: ECON 195S
Field, Erica UG Only FALL 2012 GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
Special Topics Environmental Health

Topics Vary: Special Topics in Environmentn Environmental effects on human health with a particular focus on the chronic effects of exposure to pollution and other stressors, and the interaction of anthropogenic environmental changes with infectious diseases. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Prerequisites: Introductory biology and chemistry, or consent of instructor.

ENVIRON 590
Was: ENVIRON 298
Meyer, Joel UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Special Topics

Cities and Stormwater

BIOLOGY 490S
Was: BIOLOGY 295S
Wilson, William UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Special Topics Global Health, Law, and Ethics

This course examines the law and ethics of global health work with diverse populations, and strategies for organizing stakeholders to address global health challenges. Students look at the ways in which law regulates collaboration in global health. The class addresses the role of international organizations and treaties, national legal systems, global business, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the global and local governance of health. Students also consider the law, politics and ethics of policy-making, clinical work, research and community organizing, as well as the impacts on individuals, families and communities. Course topics include the following: global health governance; NGOs; national health systems and legal rights to health; community health research; access to medicines and pharmaceutical development; clinical trials; genetic information protection; health information systems; health disparities; health social movements; best outcomes vs. distributive justice; health and human rights; and human subjects protection.

GLHLTH 390
Was: GLHLTH 180
Cross, Jason UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Special Topics Hacking For Health
Crosslisted as PSY 190FS
GLHLTH 170FS
Was: GLHLTH 90FCS
Ariely, Dan UG Only FALL 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Technology for Health: Revolutions in Low Resource Settings

Examines innovations in global health informatics and how technology use in low resource settings is rapidly changing health care. Explores the use of technology for data collection, health interventions, and analysis, and how this is revolutionizing health systems, services, and outcomes. The course will include hands-on sessions using technology to map health information.

Course Notes
This course is for Focus students only
GLHLTH 173FS
Green, Eric UG Only FALL 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Tropical Medicine - Costa Rica

Part of a 15-week semester abroad program in Costa Rica (through OTS). Integrates classroom and field instruction to introduce fundamental principles of tropical medicine and public health including the tropical environment and its related health issues

GLHLTH 383A
Was: GLHLTH 171
Benavides Rawson, Jorge UG Only FALL 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Tropical Medicine - Costa Rica

Part of a 15-week semester abroad program in Costa Rica (through OTS). Integrates classroom and field instruction to introduce fundamental principles of tropical medicine and public health including the tropical environment and its related health issues

GLHLTH 383A
Was: GLHLTH 171
Staff UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Ungraded Research in Global Health

Individual research in a field of special interest, the central goal of which is a substantive paper containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Consent required.

GLHLTH 781
Was: GLHLTH 381
Woods, Chris GRAD Only SPRING 2012 MSC: Thesis
US Environmental Policy
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 275

This course focuses on environmental policy issues
in the United States. We will consider the full range of the social sciences in our analysis, including the
political, economic, ethical, legal, and institutional issues involved in environmental decision-making. The
course will cover: the preservation and conservation movements, environmental priorities, the political
process, the formation of the EPA, the Clean Air Act, RCRA and superfund legislation, the Clean Water Act,
FIFRA, the Endangered Species Act, public lands policy, and institutional issues. The course is designed to
give students an understanding of the important conceptual issues in environmental policy-making, as well as an overview of current environmental legislation.

ENVIRON 212
Was: ENVIRON 149
Staff UG Only FALL 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
US Environmental Policy
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 275

This course focuses on environmental policy issues
in the United States. We will consider the full range of the social sciences in our analysis, including the
political, economic, ethical, legal, and institutional issues involved in environmental decision-making. The
course will cover: the preservation and conservation movements, environmental priorities, the political
process, the formation of the EPA, the Clean Air Act, RCRA and superfund legislation, the Clean Water Act,
FIFRA, the Endangered Species Act, public lands policy, and institutional issues. The course is designed to
give students an understanding of the important conceptual issues in environmental policy-making, as well as an overview of current environmental legislation.

ENVIRON 212
Was: ENVIRON 149
Clark, Jeffery UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
US Health Disparities

The most commonly used indices to measure United States health disparities by race/ethnicity; origins and evolution of racial/ethnic categories in the United States Census; role of poverty, racial residential segregation, and inadequate health care in explaining racial/ethnic health disparities; and the promise and limitations of academic-community partnerships and public policy initiatives designed to reduce and ultimately eliminate those health disparities.

SOCIOL 361
Was: SOCIOL 129
Sherman, James UG Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Virology and Viral Oncology MGM 552
Was: MGM 252
Cullen, Bryan UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Vulnerable Populations and Global Health

Vulnerable Populations and Global Health explores the complex social, economic, institutional, and political factors contributing to the health disparities of vulnerable populations. Through a variety of compelling texts, this intensive seminar will explore the following questions: What constitutes a vulnerable population? How does the biopsychosocial model help to elucidate vulnerability as a determinant of health? How does the complex interaction of agency and constraint contribute to the global health disparities of vulnerable populations? What special considerations do interventions with vulnerable population require? What can vulnerable populations teach us about improving global health outcomes? And what role should social justice and human rights play in global health? Course format will primarily be discussion.

GLHLTH 171FS
Was: GLHLTH 165FCS
Boyd, David UG Only FALL 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Water, Cooperation, and Conflict
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 533s ENVIRON 543S

Focuses on potential for transboundary water resources-related conflict and cooperation. Discusses water scarcity concepts, natural resource conflict theory, hydro politics, hydro hegemony, water security, water markets and institutions, game theory, and international water law. Other topics include the economics of water and health. Case studies complement the broader course outlook.

PUBPOL 580S
Was: PUBPOL 264S
Jeuland, Marc UG/GRAD FALL 2012 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Wealth, Power and Inequality SOCIOL 211
Was: SOCIOL 111
Keister, Lisa UG Only FALL 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
20th Century American Medicine HISTORY 370
Was: HISTORY 190A
English, Peter UG Only FALL 2011 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Abortion in American Culture HISTORY 372
Was: HISTORY 190C
English, Peter UG Only FALL 2011 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Aids and Other Emerging Diseases

Explores the interaction of biology and culture in creating and defining diseases through an investigation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and other emerging diseases: molecular biology; biology of transmission and infection; the role of people and culture in the evolution of infectious diseases; reasons for the geographic variations in disease. The inductive-deductive methodology of science is both used to develop and test hypotheses as well as examined itself as an analytical tool. Intended for nonmajors.

BIOLOGY 154
Was: BIOLOGY 46
Broverman, Sherryl UG Only SPRING 2011 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Natural Science
Air Quality Management

Types, sources, effects of air pollutants. Regulatory framework emphasizing the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and federal, state, local agency implementation. Application of risk assessment, technology, market incentives to air management. Scientific, policy aspects of acid deposition, global climate change, indoor air, mobile sources control. Dispersion modeling, exposure assessment. Instructor: Vandenberg. 3 units.

ENVIRON 535
Was: ENVIRON 235
Vandenberg, John UG/GRAD FALL 2011 MSC: Elective
Design for the Developing World

Design of custom devices to help the specific and unique needs of developing world hospitals. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized; overview of developing world conditions, patent issues, engineering ethics.Oral and written reports will be required. Students may elect to personally deliver their projects to a developing world hospital, if selected, in the summer following the course. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 154L and Statistics 113. Consent of instructor required.

BME 462L
Was: BME 262
Malkin, Robert UG Only FALL 2011 GHC: Methods
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
GHC: Elective
Design for the Developing World

Design of custom devices to help the specific and unique needs of developing world hospitals. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized; overview of developing world conditions, patent issues, engineering ethics.Oral and written reports will be required. Students may elect to personally deliver their projects to a developing world hospital, if selected, in the summer following the course. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 154L and Statistics 113. Consent of instructor required.

BME 462L
Was: BME 262
Malkin, Robert UG Only SPRING 2011 GHC: Methods
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
GHC: Elective
Devices For People With Disabilities

Design of custom devices to aid disabled individuals. Students will be paired with health care professionals at local hospitals who will supervise the development of projects for specific clients. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized; overview of assistive technologies, patent issues, engineering ethics. Oral and written reports will be required. Selected projects may be continued as independent study. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 154L and Statistics 113. Consent of instructor required.

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC ELECTIVE. Counts as Elective only if taken prior to Fall 2009.
BME 460L
Was: BME 260
Bohs, Laurence UG Only FALL 2011 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Economic Analysis for Environment and Public Health
Crosslisted as ENVIRON 563 PUBPOL 607

Course considers the importance of economic analysis, or cost-benefit analysis (CBA), for public policy assessments. Specific focus is on health and environmental policy, and the steps in identification / cataloguing, quantification, and monetization of impacts of potential policies and projects. Covers: Economic rationale for CBA; Basic principles for assessing the economic effects of projects; Techniques for valuing health and environmental impacts; Intergenerational/philosophical concerns related to CBA; Social discounting; Risk and uncertainty; Comparisons of CBA with other approaches (i.e. cost effectiveness analysis, multi-objective analysis).

GLHLTH 531
Was: GLHLTH 224
Jeuland, Marc UG/GRAD SPRING 2011 MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Economic Growth and Development Policy Economic Growth And Development Policy
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 286

Basic principles and policy issues in the study of economic growth and development. The roles of physical, natural and human capital, technological innovation, productivity improvements and institutions in explaining patterns and causes of variations in growth and development performance of countries. Effects on growth and development of many current policy issues including HIV-AIDs, financial crises, foreign aid and investment, debt burdens and forgiveness, corruption and governance. Prerequisites: Public Policy 110 or Economics 149.

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC METHODS. Counts as Methods only if taken prior to Fall 2009.
ECON 286
Was: ECON 286
Fernholz, Fernando UG Only FALL 2011 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Engineering Sustainable Design and Construction

Design and testing of solutions to complex interdisciplinary design products in a service learning context. Technical design principles; sustainable and engineering best practices; prototype formation, testing and evaluation; and establishment of research and analysis methodologies in a community based research experience. Working in partnership with a community agency (local, national, or international) and participation in an experimental learning process by engineering a design solution for an identified community need. Evaluation focused on design deliverables, fabricated prototypes and a critical reflection of the experimental learning process. One credit. Prerequisites: EGR 75 or ECE 27 or consent of instructor.

CE 315
Was: CE 185
Schaad, David UG Only SPRING 2011 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Environmental Toxicology

Study of environmental contaminants from a broad perspective encompassing biochemical, ecological, and toxicological principles and methodologies. Discussion of sources, environmental transport and transformation phenomena, accumulation in biota and ecosystems. Impacts at various levels of organization, particularly biochemical and physiological effects. Prerequisites: organic chemistry and vertebrate physiology or consent of instructor. Instructor: Di Giulio. 3 units.

ENVIRON 501
Was: ENVIRON 212
Meyer, Joel UG/GRAD FALL 2011 MSC: Elective
Ethics For Global Health Research

This course will present an overview of practical and theoretical approaches to bioethics from a range of perspectives, including the humanities, law, philosophy, medicine and science. Students will apply various resources, terminology and frameworks to case studies which will prepare them for their own research. The course will include IRB and responsible conduct of research. (2 credits)

GLHLTH 740
Was: GLHLTH 330
Hawkins, Jennifer McKinney, Ross Sreenivasan, Gopal GRAD Only SPRING 2011 MSC: Core
Fieldwork Methods: Cultural Analysis And Interpretation

Anthropology as a discipline (a field of study) and the site where anthropologists work: the field. Combines theories of anthropological fieldwork methods with practice, including participation, observation, and interviews. Students undertake original research in a local fieldsite of their choice and produce their own mini-ethnography.

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC METHODS OR ELECTIVE. Counts as METHODS OR Elective only if taken prior to Fall 2009.
CULANTH 302
Was: CULANTH 194
Byerly, Ingrid UG Only FALL 2011
Gender, Poverty, and Health
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 212

See GLHLTH 212

SOCIOL 212
Was: SOCIOL 112
Toller-Erausquin, Jennifer UG Only SPRING 2011 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Social Determinants
General Microbiology

The course consists of a lecture and laboratory, each of which meets twice a week. Lectures include an overview of the history of microbiology, and cover both classical and modern bacteriological principles. Topics discussed include prokaryotic and eukaryotic structure, criteria used in classification, physiology (including reproduction, growth and metabolism), genetics (classical and molecular), infection and immunity, and environmental and industrial aspects involving microorganisms.

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC METHODS. Counts as Methods only if taken prior to Fall 2009.
BIOLOGY 212L
Was: BIOLOGY 103L
Staff UG Only FALL 2011 GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
General Microbiology

The course consists of a lecture and laboratory, each of which meets twice a week. Lectures include an overview of the history of microbiology, and cover both classical and modern bacteriological principles. Topics discussed include prokaryotic and eukaryotic structure, criteria used in classification, physiology (including reproduction, growth and metabolism), genetics (classical and molecular), infection and immunity, and environmental and industrial aspects involving microorganisms.

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC METHODS. Counts as Methods only if taken prior to Fall 2009.
BIOLOGY 212L
Was: BIOLOGY 103L
Staff UG Only SPRING 2011 GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
Global Diseases-Focus Only

Biological, social, and cultural factors impacting global disease spread and/or reduction; current challenges in vaccination and disease control programs; Open only to students in the Focus Program.

Students will evaluate the factors - biological, social, and cultural – that impact how diseases spread through populations, and that makes them easier or harder to control. How can we use what we’ve learned from past attempts at disease elimination to improve current programs? Students will learn the biology of major global diseases caused by a range of pathogens, including TB, malaria, and smallpox. These diseases will be used as case studies to address the evolution and ecology of disease; antibiotic resistance; vaccine development and immunization programs; and tropical diseases versus diseases of poverty. Other potential topics include polio, influenza, SARS and HIV. Biological, social, and cultural factors impacting global disease spread and/or reduction; current challenges in vaccination and disease control programs; Open only to students in the Focus Program.

Students will evaluate the factors - biological, social, and cultural – that impact how diseases spread through populations, and that makes them easier or harder to control. How can we use what we’ve learned from past attempts at disease elimination to improve current programs? Students will learn the biology of major global diseases caused by a range of pathogens, including TB, malaria, and smallpox. These diseases will be used as case studies to address the evolution and ecology of disease; antibiotic resistance; vaccine development and immunization programs; and tropical diseases versus diseases of poverty. Other potential topics include polio, influenza, SARS and HIV.

BIOLOGY 180FS
Was: BIOLOGY 92FCS
Broverman, Sherryl UG Only FALL 2011 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Environmental Health: Economics and Policy
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 582 GLHLTH 538

Social science perspective on global environmental health. Students will learn to identify primary environmental causes of high burden diseases such as malaria, diarrhea, and respiratory infections; describe how to measure socio-economic impacts of global environmental health diseases; discuss key policies to control global environmental health problems based on private prevention and therapeutic behaviors; and propose frameworks to empirically monitor and evaluate global environmental health policies. A sub-module will focus on climate change and water-borne diseases. Prerequisites: Intro course in statistics.

ENVIRON 538
Was: ENVIRON 238
Pattanayak, Subhrendu UG/GRAD FALL 2011 MSC: Elective
Global Health and International Development in the Nonprofit Sector

Explore issues of global health and international development work in the non-profit sector. Topics include, delivery of culturally appropriate global health assistance to low resource countries, challenges in working in developing countries, different approaches to development work, management principles of non-governmental organizations (NGO's), and monitoring and evaluation of global health program outcomes. Topics will be explored through lecture, discussion and small group work. Final class presentation and paper will focus on developing a case study centered on a select global health problem and the non-profit organization(s) approach to delivering health care solutions.

GLHLTH 351
Was: GLHLTH 166
Walmer, Katherine UG Only SPRING 2011 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Health Capstone

Capstone Course for students in Global Health Certificate. Group analysis of a current global health problem/issue. Project involves background research, data acquisition, analysis, writing, and presentation of a substantial research paper/report at an advanced level. Consent of instructor required.

Course Notes
Course number was GLHLTH 255S prior to spring 2010. Course is no longer offered as a seminar.
GLHLTH 501
Was: GLHLTH 255
Boyd, David UG/GRAD SPRING 2011 GHC: Capstone
MAJOR: Senior Seminar
Global Health Challenges

Course introduces major global health problems and social, behavioral, economic, biomedical and environmental determinants of health in resource limited settings. Topics include communicable diseases i.e. HIV, malaria, tuberculosis and common childhood diseases; chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and mental health; and determinants of health associated with these diseases, such as poverty, gender imbalance, culture, poor environmental sanitation, malnutrition, tobacco use, and climate change. Other topics may include health promotion, reproductive health, maternal and child health, and disaster preparedness.

GLHLTH 701
Was: GLHLTH 310
Woods, Chris GRAD Only FALL 2011 MSC: Core
Global Health Ethics
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 330 GLHLTH 540 PUBPOL 638

Ethical issues of conducting research on or working with marginalized/stigmatized populations,
using theoretical frameworks and case studies. Investigations of ethical choices made by
multinational, national and local policymakers, clinicians, and researchers and their impact on
individuals, families and communities. Emphasis on working with community partners in developing needs
assessment programs. Topics include: differential standards of care; protection of human subjects;
access to essential medicines; genetic information and confidentiality; pharmaceutical development;
health information technology; placebo controlled trials; best outcomes vs. distributive justice.

Course Notes
Permission required. GLHLTH 150 or equivalent GH knowledge required. Priority given to Global Health Certificate students.
GLHLTH 210
Was: GLHLTH 151
Cross, Jason UG Only SPRING 2011 GHC: Ethics
GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
Global Health Policy and Policy Making

Introduction to essential global health policy concepts, understanding of global health policy-making, how policies affect reality on the ground in global health and development. Build critical analytical skills and the ability to translate coursework into broader understanding of policies and policy-making. Includes lectures, analysis, discussion, readings, case studies. Open to juniors, seniors, and Master's students pursuing GH certificate or public policy, MSc in GH, SOM third year. Department consent required.

GLHLTH 570
Was: GLHLTH 222
Miller, Michael UG/GRAD FALL 2011 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Policy
Global Health Research: Design and Practice

Course provides a foundation in study design, research question development, field implementation, measurement, validity and reliability. Quantitative and qualitative research approaches are examined. Students build critical skills in reading, interpreting and synthesizing scientific literature. The selection of appropriate measurements and survey development is emphasized and issues in field implementation explored.

GLHLTH 702
Was: GLHLTH 321
Read, Jen'nan GRAD Only FALL 2011 MSC: Core
Global Health Research: Epidemiologic Methods II

Course builds on Epidemiologic Methods I to present advanced topics in epidemiology. Topics include review of study designs including meta-analysis; intensive study of bias, including confounding, selection bias, and misclassification; missing data; sensitivity analysis; topics in regression analysis; and an introduction to the analysis of time to event data, including lifetable methods, survival curves, and Cox proportional hazards regression. Discussions of causal inference and how to read, review, and write scientific literature. Course has a weekly data analysis lab section to develop programming and statistical analysis skills. Prerequisite: Epidemiologic Methods I or equivalent. Course builds on Epidemiologic Methods I to present advanced topics in epidemiology. Topics include review of study designs including meta-analysis; intensive study of bias, including confounding, selection bias, and misclassification; missing data; sensitivity analysis; topics in regression analysis; and an introduction to the analysis of time to event data, including lifetable methods, survival curves, and Cox proportional hazards regression. Discussions of causal inference and how to read, review, and write scientific literature. Course has a weekly data analysis lab section to develop programming and statistical analysis skills. Prerequisite: Epidemiologic Methods I or equivalent.

GLHLTH 706
Was: GLHLTH 325
Westreich, Daniel GRAD Only SPRING 2011 MSC: Elective
Global Health Special Topics-Ethics GH and Human Rights - Summer 2011

Topics vary depending on semester and section. Topics may include: global health ethics, field methods, health technologies, rapid needs assessment, and global health policies. This course considers how law and technology together affect the types of health services available to people in different parts of the world. It examines the role of international organizations and treaties, national legal systems, global business, and NGOs in the global governance of healthcare. Students study the development and use of medicines and other healthcare technology. Classes discuss how law regulates the innovation of healthcare technology and access to its benefits and risks. The course also investigates how culture affects attitudes toward law and technology in healthcare. Topics include the following: international health diplomacy; NGO business models; public and private medical R&D; intellectual property and innovation; how international trade and investment affects access to medicines and environmental health; new uses of information and communication technologies for global health; crisis response healthcare; different ways health systems implement constitutional rights to healthcare; and how technology and law together affect the emphasis of different health systems (e.g. high-tech specialist care, primary care, traditional medicine, and/or preventive public health).

GLHLTH 390S
Was: GLHLTH 180S
Cross, Jason UG Only Summer 2011 GHC: Elective
GHC: Ethics
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Health Special Topics-Ethics Global Health and Human Rights
Crosslisted as CULANTH 290S PUBPOL 330 ICS 490S GLHLTH 590S

Topics vary depending on semester and section. Topics may include: global health ethics, field methods, health technologies, rapid needs assessment, and global health policies. This course considers how law and technology together affect the types of health services available to people in different parts of the world. It examines the role of international organizations and treaties, national legal systems, global business, and NGOs in the global governance of healthcare. Students study the development and use of medicines and other healthcare technology. Classes discuss how law regulates the innovation of healthcare technology and access to its benefits and risks. The course also investigates how culture affects attitudes toward law and technology in healthcare. Topics include the following: international health diplomacy; NGO business models; public and private medical R&D; intellectual property and innovation; how international trade and investment affects access to medicines and environmental health; new uses of information and communication technologies for global health; crisis response healthcare; different ways health systems implement constitutional rights to healthcare; and how technology and law together affect the emphasis of different health systems (e.g. high-tech specialist care, primary care, traditional medicine, and/or preventive public health).

GLHLTH 390S
Was: GLHLTH 180S
Cross, Jason UG Only FALL 2011 GHC: Elective
GHC: Ethics
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Mental Health GLHLTH 660
Was: GLHLTH 223S
Maselko, Joanna UG/GRAD SPRING 2011 MSC: Elective
Global Nutrition: Over and Under Nutrition in Developing Countries

Discusses the nutrition problems of developing countries. Reviews epidemiological, biological, and behavioral consequences of both overnutrition (e.g., obesity) and undernutrition (e.g., malnutrition). Emphasizes infectious disease (HIV, TB, malaria, diarrhea) of children and perinatal outcomes (e.g., fetal loss, low birth weight, HIV transmission, pre-eclampsia) of women and children. Strong focus on ethical and political issues relevant to the formulation of nutrition policy and programs in developing countries. Course is designed for graduate students or advanced undergraduates.

GLHLTH 670S
Was: GLHLTH 220S - 01
Benjamin Neelon, Sara UG/GRAD SPRING 2011 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Nutrition: Over and Under Nutrition in Developing Countries - Summer 2011

Discusses the nutrition problems of developing countries. Reviews epidemiological, biological, and behavioral consequences of both overnutrition (e.g., obesity) and undernutrition (e.g., malnutrition). Emphasizes infectious disease (HIV, TB, malaria, diarrhea) of children and perinatal outcomes (e.g., fetal loss, low birth weight, HIV transmission, pre-eclampsia) of women and children. Strong focus on ethical and political issues relevant to the formulation of nutrition policy and programs in developing countries. Course is designed for graduate students or advanced undergraduates.

GLHLTH 670S
Was: GLHLTH 220S - 01
Neelon, Sara UG/GRAD Summer 2011 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Health Systems in Developing Countries

This course introduces students to key challenges faced in strengthening of health systems in low and middle income countries. The course will cover a diverse set of topics including an overview of organization of health systems, models of purchasing and providing health care, innovations in financing health care, and issues in service delivery such as quality of care and human resource challenges. Students will learn frameworks and methods employed in the evaluation of health systems. The course will also draw attention to resource allocation problems and various frameworks used to address them. The course will primarily rely on readings from a variety of health policy, economics and other social science journals.

GLHLTH 750
Was: GLHLTH 340
Mohanan, Manoj GRAD Only SPRING 2011 MSC: Core
Indigenous Medicine and Global Health
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 721 CULANTH 247

Explores indigenous medicine’s role in global health and focuses on four interrelated topics: basic medical paradigms and practices, access and utilization in different regions, cross-cultural health delivery, and the complexities of medical pluralism. Course themes will be explored through lecture, discussion, small group case analyses, comparative analytical exercises, and workshops.

GLHLTH 301
Was: GLHLTH 164
Boyd, David UG Only SPRING 2011 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Infectious Disease

Covers the physiology and the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of a suite of infectious diseases. Case studies will include measles, influenza, dengue, cholera, Lyme disease, herpes, tuberculosis, and rabies, among others, with an emphasis on pathogens infecting humans. Topics include: basic immunology, the physiology of different disease processes and transmission, the role of population size on disease transmission, the effects of climate and behavioral changes on disease dynamics, networks of disease spread, spatial spread of disease, evolution of virulence, antigenic evolution, emerging infectious diseases. Koelle and Johnsen.

BIOLOGY 365
Was: BIOLOGY 146
Johnsen, Sonke Koelle, Katharina UG Only SPRING 2011 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Integrated Environmental Design

Student design teams complete a preliminary design of an actual environmental engineering project and present the design to a panel of civil engineering faculty and practitioners. A written technical report is required. Topics to be addressed include: the design process; cost estimation; legal, ethical, and social aspects of professional engineering practice; short-term and long-term design serviceability considerations. Open only to civil engineering students during their final two semesters. Prerequisites: Civil Engineering 120L, 123L, 124L.

CE 469
Was: CE 193
Schaad, David UG Only SPRING 2011 GHC: Methods
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
GHC: Elective
International Law and Global Health

Introductory and basic topics in public policy. Topics vary each semester. Does not count for public policy studies major. Open only to students in the Focus Program.

Course Notes
Focus Course. Course was approved for the ethics requirement if taken before Fall 2009.
CULANTH 190FS
Was: CULANTH 80FCS
Admay, Catherine UG Only FALL 2011 GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
Introduction to Epidemiology: Focus on Global Health

Introduces students to the main concepts and methods used in population-based epidemiology research. Topics covered include measures of disease frequency, study design, measures of association, and problems of bias, especially as they pertain to global health research. Students will learn to understand and evaluate epidemiological studies. A prior quantitative course is highly recommended.

GLHLTH 362
Was: GLHLTH 161
Maselko, Joanna UG Only SPRING 2011 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Introduction to Global Health
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 161

Introduction to multidisciplinary theories and techniques for assessing and addressing global, infectious, chronic, and behavioral health problems. Global health issues addressed from perspectives such as: epidemiology, biology, engineering, environment, business, human rights, nursing, psychology, law, public policy, and economics.

Course Notes
Course titled as "Multidisciplinary Approaches to Global Health" prior to fall 2012.
PUBPOL 166
Was: PUBPOL 154
Whetten, Kathryn UG Only FALL 2011 GHC: Intro
MINOR: Fundamentals
MAJOR: Core – Fundamentals
Issues of healing and caring for underserved populations: A global perspective with an emphasis on Haiti

GLHLTH 211 is a course taught through the partnership of a local nonprofit organization, Family Health Ministries and the Duke Global Health Institute. The course examines issues related to health and healing in underserved populations through an integrated lens of medicine, public health, poverty, clinical research, culture, environment and theology. This lens provides students with an opportunity to examine health from the perspective of both individuals and communities and to explore societal factors that contribute to the process of healing. As an interdisciplinary course, medical, nursing, divinity, undergraduate students, and others also work together to ‘critically examine’ the process of providing culturally relevant assistance to underserved communities.

GLHLTH 393S
Was: GLHLTH 211S
Walmer, David UG Only SPRING 2011 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Medical Anthropology
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 321T

Cross cultural experiences and understanding of health and illness, the body and non-biological aspects of medicine. Culture-specific sickness (like envidia, running amok, attention deficit disorder). Class, race, and gender inflected experiences of health. Various societies' organization of health care specialists, including biomedical doctors, voudon priestesses, and shamans.

CULANTH 424T
Was: CULANTH 191U/T
Solomon, Harris UG Only FALL 2011 GHC: Ethics
GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MAJOR: Foundations – Humanities
One Health: From Philosophy to Practice

Interdisciplinary course introducing construct of One Health as increasingly important to a holistic understanding of prevention of disease and maintenance of health. Includes discussion of bidirectional impact of animal health on human health, impact of earth’s changing ecology on health. Learning objectives include 1) to describe how different disciplines contribute to the practice of One Health, 2) to creatively design interdisciplinary interventions to improve Global Health using a One Health model. Course will include weekly 2-hour multi-campus seminar off-site at NC Biotechnology Center with on-campus discussion section using case studies to supplement the seminar.

GLHLTH 771
Was: GLHLTH 371
Woods, Chris GRAD Only SPRING 2011 MSC: Elective
Population, Health, and Policy

Substantive findings and policies/policy debates around selected topics in the field of population and health in industrialized and developing societies. Demographic models used to examine selected current population and health topics through framing, defining and evaluating key concepts. Topics include: end of population growth; relations between population, development and environment; health of populations; population aging; potentials for mortality increases; HIV/AIDS epidemic and resurgence of infectious diseases. Readings from disciplines of demography, sociology and public health.

PUBPOL 633
Was: PUBPOL 224
Merli, Maria-Giovanna UG/GRAD FALL 2011 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Poverty, Inequality, and Health
Crosslisted as AAAS 548S

Impact of poverty and socioeconomic inequality on the health of individuals and populations. Attention given to both United States and non United States populations. Topics include the conceptualization and measurement of poverty and socioeconomic inequality; socioeconomic gradients in health; globalization and health; socioeconomic deprivation across the life-course and health in adulthood; and public policy responses in the United States and elsewhere to growing health inequities in the age of globalization. Prerequisite: An introductory course in statistics. Seniors and graduate students only.

PUBPOL 644S
Was: PUBPOL 229S
James, Sherman UG/GRAD FALL 2011 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Race, Genomics, and Society
Crosslisted as AAAS 190FS

Integrated analysis of historical and contemporary aspects of `race and genetics/genomics'. Focus on relevant applications in science, medicine, and society; develop skills required for scientific, sociopolitical, cultural, psychosocial, and ethical evaluation of issues. Topics include: introduction to population genetics/genetic variation; concepts and definitions of race; overview of bioethics; social and political history of race; genomics and health disparities; race, ancestry, and medical practice; genealogy, genetic ancestry, and identity; public perceptions of race and genetics/genomics. Instructor: Royal

GENOME 258S
Was: GENOME 158S.03
Royal, Charmaine UG Only FALL 2011 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Research Methods in Global Health

Introduction to methodological techniques used in global health research, including qualitative field work, quantitative surveys, experimental designs, intervention trials, and program evaluation. Teaches strengths and weaknesses of each method, and how to determine the most appropriate method for specific research questions. Takes a problem-based approach, emphasizing the interdisciplinary nature of global health research. Focuses on how to evaluate published & unpublished research and how to design a global health research project. Skills include: identification of global health problems, conceptualization of a research question, designing a research study, and interpretation of results.

Course Notes
For students who matriculated at Duke in Fall 2009 or later, this is the only Methods course approved for the GHC. Students who matriculated at Duke prior to Fall 2009 will have had other options to fulfill the GHC Methods requirement.
GLHLTH 371
Was: GLHLTH 163
Ariely, Sumedha UG Only SPRING 2011 GHC: Methods
GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Core – Research
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Research Practicum- Costa Rica

Introduces students to research design, field methods, and basic data analysis in a tropical context. Skills include hypothesis testing and statistical analysis, orientation to basic software packages, write and present scientific papers, and design and conduct epidemiologic research.

Course Notes
Course taught as part of the Costa Rica-Global Health study abroad program offered through OTS.
GLHLTH 380A
Was: GLHLTH 172
Benavides Rawson, Jorge UG Only FALL 2011 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Research Practicum- Costa Rica

Introduces students to research design, field methods, and basic data analysis in a tropical context. Skills include hypothesis testing and statistical analysis, orientation to basic software packages, write and present scientific papers, and design and conduct epidemiologic research.

Course Notes
Course taught as part of the Costa Rica-Global Health study abroad program offered through OTS.
GLHLTH 380A
Was: GLHLTH 172
Benavides Rawson, Jorge UG Only SPRING 2011 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Special Topics Environmental Health

Topics Vary: Special Topics in Environmentn Environmental effects on human health with a particular focus on the chronic effects of exposure to pollution and other stressors, and the interaction of anthropogenic environmental changes with infectious diseases. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Prerequisites: Introductory biology and chemistry, or consent of instructor.

ENVIRON 590
Was: ENVIRON 298
Meyer, Joel UG/GRAD SPRING 2011 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Special Topics Global BioEthics
Crosslisted as PHIL 290

Course examines various problems of international ethics, discussing first in context of general ethical theory, then revisiting them in specific context of various controversies concerning conduction of clinical trials in developing countries. Problems include moral universalism and relativism; poverty relief and international aid; international health disparities; human rights; exploitation.

GLHLTH 390
Was: GLHLTH 180
Sreenivasan, Gopal UG Only SPRING 2011 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Special Topics Health and Community Development in West Africa

Designed for students returning from fieldwork in Togo, West Africa.

CULANTH 290S
Was: CULANTH 180S
Piot, Charles UG Only FALL 2011 GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
Special Topics Social Epidemiology of Obesity
Crosslisted as PSY 190FS
GLHLTH 170FS
Was: GLHLTH 90FCS
Bennett, Gary UG Only FALL 2011 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Tropical Medicine - Costa Rica

Part of a 15-week semester abroad program in Costa Rica (through OTS). Integrates classroom and field instruction to introduce fundamental principles of tropical medicine and public health including the tropical environment and its related health issues

GLHLTH 383A
Was: GLHLTH 171
Benavides Rawson, Jorge UG Only SPRING 2011 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Water, Cooperation, and Conflict

Focuses on potential for transboundary water resources-related conflict and cooperation. Discusses water scarcity concepts, natural resource conflict theory, hydro politics, hydro hegemony, water security, water markets and institutions, game theory, and international water law. Other topics include the economics of water and health. Case studies complement the broader course outlook.

PUBPOL 580S
Was: PUBPOL 264S
Jeuland, Marc UG/GRAD FALL 2011 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Aids and Other Emerging Diseases

Explores the interaction of biology and culture in creating and defining diseases through an investigation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and other emerging diseases: molecular biology; biology of transmission and infection; the role of people and culture in the evolution of infectious diseases; reasons for the geographic variations in disease. The inductive-deductive methodology of science is both used to develop and test hypotheses as well as examined itself as an analytical tool. Intended for nonmajors.

BIOLOGY 154
Was: BIOLOGY 46
Broverman, Sherryl UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Natural Science
Aids and Other Emerging Diseases

Explores the interaction of biology and culture in creating and defining diseases through an investigation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and other emerging diseases: molecular biology; biology of transmission and infection; the role of people and culture in the evolution of infectious diseases; reasons for the geographic variations in disease. The inductive-deductive methodology of science is both used to develop and test hypotheses as well as examined itself as an analytical tool. Intended for nonmajors.

BIOLOGY 154
Was: BIOLOGY 46
Broverman, Sherryl UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Natural Science
Air Quality Management

Types, sources, effects of air pollutants. Regulatory framework emphasizing the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and federal, state, local agency implementation. Application of risk assessment, technology, market incentives to air management. Scientific, policy aspects of acid deposition, global climate change, indoor air, mobile sources control. Dispersion modeling, exposure assessment. Instructor: Vandenberg. 3 units.

ENVIRON 535
Was: ENVIRON 235
Staff UG/GRAD FALL 2010 MSC: Elective
Chubby History: Obesity and Public Health

The obesity epidemic among children and adults in the United States, with focus on changes in food supply and consumption, agricultural policy, body image, exercise, federal food programs such as school lunch, food stamps, and food technology. Gender, racial, and socio-economic patterns of the epidemic. Not open to students who have taken this course as History 103 or 104.

HISTORY 371
Was: HISTORY 190B
English, Peter UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Comparative Health Care Systems
Crosslisted as POLSCI 590S PUBPOL 590S SOCIOL 371

The interaction of historical, political, economic, cultural, legal/ethical, and sociological factors in the organization and operation of health care systems. Emphasis on how cultural values penetrate the social institutions (politics, economics) that determine health care policies and their reception by societal members. Effects of social and technological change on health care systems, comparing their effects across societies with differing histories, cultural values, and economic systems. Major focus on United States, England, Sweden, and other Western societies.

POLSCI 590S
Was: POLSCI 188
Taylor, Donald UG/GRAD SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Policy
Current Issues in International and Development Economics

Issues of income distribution within and between countries, vehicles for growth, regional development, the role of politics in economic policy, multinational institutions. Cross-country and cross-time comparisons. Emphasis on individual research projects. Prerequisite: Economics 105D; and Economics 110D. Instructor: Tower

ECON 568S
Was: ECON 268S - 01
Staff UG/GRAD FALL 2010
Design for the Developing World

Design of custom devices to help the specific and unique needs of developing world hospitals. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized; overview of developing world conditions, patent issues, engineering ethics.Oral and written reports will be required. Students may elect to personally deliver their projects to a developing world hospital, if selected, in the summer following the course. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 154L and Statistics 113. Consent of instructor required.

BME 462L
Was: BME 262
Malkin, Robert UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Methods
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
GHC: Elective
Design for the Developing World

Design of custom devices to help the specific and unique needs of developing world hospitals. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized; overview of developing world conditions, patent issues, engineering ethics.Oral and written reports will be required. Students may elect to personally deliver their projects to a developing world hospital, if selected, in the summer following the course. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 154L and Statistics 113. Consent of instructor required.

BME 462L
Was: BME 262
Malkin, Robert UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Methods
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
GHC: Elective
Devices For People With Disabilities

Design of custom devices to aid disabled individuals. Students will be paired with health care professionals at local hospitals who will supervise the development of projects for specific clients. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized; overview of assistive technologies, patent issues, engineering ethics. Oral and written reports will be required. Selected projects may be continued as independent study. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 154L and Statistics 113. Consent of instructor required.

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC ELECTIVE. Counts as Elective only if taken prior to Fall 2009.
BME 460L
Was: BME 260
Caves, Kevin Bohs, Laurence UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Ecology and Evolution

Fundamental principles of ecology and evolutionary
biology. Interaction between biotic and abiotic forces in shaping the dynamics of ecological systems, and how
those dynamics are influenced by human activities. Mechanisms of evolutionary change as an interplay between
ecology and genetics. Evidence for, and consequences of, evolutionary change on both human and geological time scales. Prerequisite: Biology 25L. Not open to students who have taken Biology 110L or 120.

BIOLOGY 116
Was: BIOLOGY 116
Staff UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Economic Growth and Development Policy Economic Growth And Development Policy
Crosslisted as ECON 286

Basic principles and policy issues in the study of economic growth and development. The roles of physical, natural and human capital, technological innovation, productivity improvements and institutions in explaining patterns and causes of variations in growth and development performance of countries. Effects on growth and development of many current policy issues including HIV-AIDs, financial crises, foreign aid and investment, debt burdens and forgiveness, corruption and governance. Prerequisites: Public Policy 110 or Economics 149. Instructor: Fernholz, Glenday, or Shukla. 3 units. C-L: Economics 286 Basic principles and policy issues in the study of economic growth and development. The roles of physical, natural and human capital, technological innovation, productivity improvements and institutions in explaining patterns and causes of variations in growth and development performance of countries. Effects on growth and development of many current policy issues including HIV-AIDs, financial crises, foreign aid and investment, debt burdens and forgiveness, corruption and governance. Prerequisites: Public Policy 110 or Economics 149.

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC ELECTIVE. Counts as GHC Elective only if taken prior to Fall 2009. This course does count as an elective in the MSc-GH program.
PUBPOL 286
Was: PUBPOL 286
Fernholz, Fernando UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Engineering Sustainable Design and Construction

Design and testing of solutions to complex interdisciplinary design products in a service learning context. Technical design principles; sustainable and engineering best practices; prototype formation, testing and evaluation; and establishment of research and analysis methodologies in a community based research experience. Working in partnership with a community agency (local, national, or international) and participation in an experimental learning process by engineering a design solution for an identified community need. Evaluation focused on design deliverables, fabricated prototypes and a critical reflection of the experimental learning process. One credit. Prerequisites: EGR 75 or ECE 27 or consent of instructor.

CE 315
Was: CE 185
Schaad, David UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Engineering Sustainable Design and Construction

Design and testing of solutions to complex interdisciplinary design products in a service learning context. Technical design principles; sustainable and engineering best practices; prototype formation, testing and evaluation; and establishment of research and analysis methodologies in a community based research experience. Working in partnership with a community agency (local, national, or international) and participation in an experimental learning process by engineering a design solution for an identified community need. Evaluation focused on design deliverables, fabricated prototypes and a critical reflection of the experimental learning process. One credit. Prerequisites: EGR 75 or ECE 27 or consent of instructor.

CE 315
Was: CE 185
Schaad, David UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Environmental Chemisty and Toxicology

An overview of the fate, transport
and biological effects of chemicals in the environment. Four types of chemicals that archetypical of environmental
pollutants will be discussed, including polar and non-polar organic compounds; such as insecticides and
pesticides; oxidants; and metals. Topics include characterization of pollutants, the chemistry of natural
waters, soils and atmosphere; chemical transport between compartments; chemical and biological transformation;
and the ecological, toxicological, and molecular biological responses associated with chemical exposure. Case studies will be incorporated that focus on the impact of chemical pollutants on large-scale ecosystems and human health.

ENVIRON 360
Was: ENVIRON 160
Stapleton, Heather UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Environmental Toxicology

Study of environmental contaminants from a broad perspective encompassing biochemical, ecological, and toxicological principles and methodologies. Discussion of sources, environmental transport and transformation phenomena, accumulation in biota and ecosystems. Impacts at various levels of organization, particularly biochemical and physiological effects. Prerequisites: organic chemistry and vertebrate physiology or consent of instructor. Instructor: Di Giulio. 3 units.

ENVIRON 501
Was: ENVIRON 212
Meyer, Joel UG/GRAD FALL 2010 MSC: Elective
Ethics For Global Health Research

This course will present an overview of practical and theoretical approaches to bioethics from a range of perspectives, including the humanities, law, philosophy, medicine and science. Students will apply various resources, terminology and frameworks to case studies which will prepare them for their own research. The course will include IRB and responsible conduct of research. (2 credits)

GLHLTH 740
Was: GLHLTH 330
McKinney, Ross GRAD Only SPRING 2010 MSC: Core
Ethics in Professions: Scientific, Personal and Organizational Frameworks

Ethics studied through the analysis and interpretation of case studies from the scientific and engineering professions. Topics include: moral development; concepts of truth and fairness; responsible conduct of research; the person and virtues; confidentiality; risk and safety; social responsibility; etiology and consequences of fraud and malpractice; legal aspects of professionalism, and allocation of resources. The capstone course for students completing the certificate in the Program in Science, Technology, and Human Values.

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC ETHICS. Counts as Ethics only if taken prior to Fall 2009.
EGR 350S
Was: EGR 108S
Staff UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
General Microbiology

The course consists of a lecture and laboratory, each of which meets twice a week. Lectures include an overview of the history of microbiology, and cover both classical and modern bacteriological principles. Topics discussed include prokaryotic and eukaryotic structure, criteria used in classification, physiology (including reproduction, growth and metabolism), genetics (classical and molecular), infection and immunity, and environmental and industrial aspects involving microorganisms.

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC METHODS. Counts as Methods only if taken prior to Fall 2009.
BIOLOGY 212L
Was: BIOLOGY 103L
Staff UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
General Microbiology

The course consists of a lecture and laboratory, each of which meets twice a week. Lectures include an overview of the history of microbiology, and cover both classical and modern bacteriological principles. Topics discussed include prokaryotic and eukaryotic structure, criteria used in classification, physiology (including reproduction, growth and metabolism), genetics (classical and molecular), infection and immunity, and environmental and industrial aspects involving microorganisms.

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC METHODS. Counts as Methods only if taken prior to Fall 2009.
BIOLOGY 212L
Was: BIOLOGY 103L
Staff UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
Genomic Perspectives on Human Evolution

Human evolutionary history as studied from the perspective of the genome. Nature of contemporary genomic data and how they are interpreted in the context of the fossil record, comparative anatomy, psychology, and cultural studies. Examination of both the origin of modern humans as a distinct species and subsequent migration across the world. Emphasis on language, behavior, and disease susceptibility as traits of particular evolutionary interest. Prerequisite: Biology 118 or equivalent course. Instructor: Wray

BIOLOGY 554
Was: BIOLOGY 274-01
Staff UG/GRAD FALL 2010 MSC: Elective
Global Diseases-Focus Only

Biological, social, and cultural factors impacting global disease spread and/or reduction; current challenges in vaccination and disease control programs; Open only to students in the Focus Program.

Students will evaluate the factors - biological, social, and cultural – that impact how diseases spread through populations, and that makes them easier or harder to control. How can we use what we’ve learned from past attempts at disease elimination to improve current programs? Students will learn the biology of major global diseases caused by a range of pathogens, including TB, malaria, and smallpox. These diseases will be used as case studies to address the evolution and ecology of disease; antibiotic resistance; vaccine development and immunization programs; and tropical diseases versus diseases of poverty. Other potential topics include polio, influenza, SARS and HIV. Biological, social, and cultural factors impacting global disease spread and/or reduction; current challenges in vaccination and disease control programs; Open only to students in the Focus Program.

Students will evaluate the factors - biological, social, and cultural – that impact how diseases spread through populations, and that makes them easier or harder to control. How can we use what we’ve learned from past attempts at disease elimination to improve current programs? Students will learn the biology of major global diseases caused by a range of pathogens, including TB, malaria, and smallpox. These diseases will be used as case studies to address the evolution and ecology of disease; antibiotic resistance; vaccine development and immunization programs; and tropical diseases versus diseases of poverty. Other potential topics include polio, influenza, SARS and HIV.

BIOLOGY 180FS
Was: BIOLOGY 92FCS
Broverman, Sherryl UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Environmental Health: Economics and Policy
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 538 PUBPOL 582

Social science perspective on global environmental health. Students will learn to identify primary environmental causes of high burden diseases such as malaria, diarrhea, and respiratory infections; describe how to measure socio-economic impacts of global environmental health diseases; discuss key policies to control global environmental health problems based on private prevention and therapeutic behaviors; and propose frameworks to empirically monitor and evaluate global environmental health policies. A sub-module will focus on climate change and water-borne diseases. Prerequisites: Intro course in statistics.

ENVIRON 538
Was: ENVIRON 238
Pattanayak, Subhrendu UG/GRAD FALL 2010 MSC: Elective
Global Health Capstone

Capstone Course for students in Global Health Certificate. Group analysis of a current global health problem/issue. Project involves background research, data acquisition, analysis, writing, and presentation of a substantial research paper/report at an advanced level. Consent of instructor required.

Course Notes
Course number was GLHLTH 255S prior to spring 2010. Course is no longer offered as a seminar.
GLHLTH 501
Was: GLHLTH 255
Green, Eric UG/GRAD SPRING 2010 GHC: Capstone
MAJOR: Senior Seminar
Global Health Capstone

Capstone Course for students in Global Health Certificate. Group analysis of a current global health problem/issue. Project involves background research, data acquisition, analysis, writing, and presentation of a substantial research paper/report at an advanced level. Consent of instructor required.

Course Notes
Course number was GLHLTH 255S prior to spring 2010. Course is no longer offered as a seminar.
GLHLTH 501
Was: GLHLTH 255
Clements, Dennis UG/GRAD SPRING 2010 GHC: Capstone
MAJOR: Senior Seminar
Global Health Challenges

Course introduces major global health problems and social, behavioral, economic, biomedical and environmental determinants of health in resource limited settings. Topics include communicable diseases i.e. HIV, malaria, tuberculosis and common childhood diseases; chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and mental health; and determinants of health associated with these diseases, such as poverty, gender imbalance, culture, poor environmental sanitation, malnutrition, tobacco use, and climate change. Other topics may include health promotion, reproductive health, maternal and child health, and disaster preparedness.

GLHLTH 701
Was: GLHLTH 310
Woods, Chris Chapman-Page, Kimberly GRAD Only FALL 2010 MSC: Core
Global Health Ethics
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 638

Same as Global Health 151 but requires an additional paper; not open to students who have taken
Global Health 151. Instructor consent required.

GLHLTH 540
Was: GLHLTH 251
Whetten, Kathryn UG/GRAD FALL 2010 GHC: Ethics
GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
Global Health Ethics PUBPOL 638
Was: PUBPOL 256
Cross, Jason UG/GRAD SPRING 2010 GHC: Ethics
GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
Global Health Policy and Policy Making

Introduction to essential global health policy concepts, understanding of global health policy-making, how policies affect reality on the ground in global health and development. Build critical analytical skills and the ability to translate coursework into broader understanding of policies and policy-making. Includes lectures, analysis, discussion, readings, case studies. Open to juniors, seniors, and Master's students pursuing GH certificate or public policy, MSc in GH, SOM third year. Department consent required.

GLHLTH 570
Was: GLHLTH 222
Staff UG/GRAD FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Policy
Global Health Research: Design and Practice

Course provides a foundation in study design, research question development, field implementation, measurement, validity and reliability. Quantitative and qualitative research approaches are examined. Students build critical skills in reading, interpreting and synthesizing scientific literature. The selection of appropriate measurements and survey development is emphasized and issues in field implementation explored.

GLHLTH 702
Was: GLHLTH 321
Read, Jen'nan GRAD Only FALL 2010 MSC: Core
Global Health Supply, Organization and Financing
Crosslisted as ECON 284 GLHLTH 332

Overview of choices countries make structuring health care delivery, financing systems, cost effectiveness and cost benefit analysis. Hospitals, physicians and pharmaceuticals in low/middle income countries.

ECON 246
Was: ECON 184
Sloan, Frank UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Health Supply, Organization and Financing

Overview of choices countries make structuring health care delivery, financing systems, cost effectiveness and cost benefit analysis. Hospitals, physicians and pharmaceuticals in low/middle income countries.

ECON 246
Was: ECON 184
Sloan, Frank UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Health, Culture, and Ethics

Special topics writing course, similar in content to GLHLTH 151/PUBPOL 155- Global Health Ethics.

CULANTH 80S
Was: CULANTH 20S
Cross, Jason UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
GHC: Ethics
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Nutrition: Over and Under Nutrition in Developing Countries

Discusses the nutrition problems of developing countries. Reviews epidemiological, biological, and behavioral consequences of both overnutrition (e.g., obesity) and undernutrition (e.g., malnutrition). Emphasizes infectious disease (HIV, TB, malaria, diarrhea) of children and perinatal outcomes (e.g., fetal loss, low birth weight, HIV transmission, pre-eclampsia) of women and children. Strong focus on ethical and political issues relevant to the formulation of nutrition policy and programs in developing countries. Course is designed for graduate students or advanced undergraduates.

GLHLTH 670S
Was: GLHLTH 220S - 01
Benjamin Neelon, Sara UG/GRAD SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Globalization and Governance

Seminar explores economic, political, and social aspects of globalization and their implications for public policy making in the twenty-first century. Focus on issues of governance, particularly international cooperation, the design of international organizations, and the role of international NGOs. Policy areas include international trade and finance, environment, security, human rights, media and communications, and international development.

PUBPOL 820
Was: PUBPOL 320
Staff GRAD Only FALL 2010 MSC: Elective
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Provides the student the opportunity to incorporate health promotion and disease prevention assessment and intervention into the health of clients across the life span. Applying the principles of health education, the course prepares students to use the tools and skills necessary to provide health promotion and disease
prevention services to individuals, families, groups, and communities. The definition of health and the factors that impact an individual's or group's health framework is the basis for understanding health maintenance interventions. 3 credits.

NURSING 502
Was: NURSING 502
Staff UG/GRAD FALL 2010 MSC: Elective
Health Systems in Developing Countries

This course introduces students to key challenges faced in strengthening of health systems in low and middle income countries. The course will cover a diverse set of topics including an overview of organization of health systems, models of purchasing and providing health care, innovations in financing health care, and issues in service delivery such as quality of care and human resource challenges. Students will learn frameworks and methods employed in the evaluation of health systems. The course will also draw attention to resource allocation problems and various frameworks used to address them. The course will primarily rely on readings from a variety of health policy, economics and other social science journals.

GLHLTH 750
Was: GLHLTH 340
Mohanan, Manoj GRAD Only SPRING 2010 MSC: Core
Health, Culture and the Latino Community

Issues associated with access to the health care industry for growing Latino/a population in the US. Topics: cultural competency issues, medical practices, lexical knowledge related to the field. Develop research proposal informed by required 20 hours of service work with local community partners. Assessment on knowledge of content, oral and written Spanish, and participation in service. Recommended students take 100-level Spanish course prior to enrolling. Pre-requisite: Spanish 76 or equivalent.

SPANISH 306
Was: SPANISH 106A
Paredes, Liliana UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
History of Public Health in America HISTORY 369
Was: HISTORY 189B
Staff UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Social Determinants
Human Genetics

Topics include segregation, genetic linkage, population genetics, multifactorial inheritance, biochemical genetics, cytogenetics, somatic cell genetics, neurogenetics, cancer genetics, clinical genetics, positional cloning, complex disease. Lectures plus weekly discussion of assigned papers from the research literature. Prerequisites: University Program in Genetics 278 or equivalent, and graduate status or consent of instructor. Instructors: Marchuk, Pericak-Vance, and Speer. 3 units. C-L: University Program in Genetics 232

MGM 532
Was: MGM 232
Staff UG/GRAD FALL 2010 MSC: Elective
Independent Study in Global Health

Individual non-research directed study in a field of special interest on a previously approved topic, under the supervision of a faculty member, resulting in a significant academic product. By consent of instructor and DGS.

GLHLTH 791
Was: GLHLTH 391
Staff GRAD Only FALL 2010 MSC: Thesis
Indigenous Medicine and Global Health
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 721 CULANTH 247

Explores indigenous medicine’s role in global health and focuses on four interrelated topics: basic medical paradigms and practices, access and utilization in different regions, cross-cultural health delivery, and the complexities of medical pluralism. Course themes will be explored through lecture, discussion, small group case analyses, comparative analytical exercises, and workshops.

GLHLTH 301
Was: GLHLTH 164
Boyd, David UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Infected: Bodies, Culture, and Politics

Exposure, outbreak, contamination, infection, transmission, cleanliness, pollution. Why is the narrative of contagion and infection so useful as both a description of events and fear of the unknown? Who is infected, by whom, with what? This class will underscore that language matters: contagion is not just a neutral description of how something spreads. On the contrary, it requires an understanding of borders and boundaries, and how they might get crossed or punctured. Contagion produces both clean subjects and dirty subjects, and it highlights how one infects the other. Understanding how an object, body, language, idea or culture travels – through time, place, language and other social connections – requires careful consideration of both how we understand (and write about) the past and how we anticipate (and produce) the future. Contagion is not a contemporary invention; it has both a long history and the ability to regenerate itself depending on the historical moment. Contagion currently functions as a narrative or justification in a massive array of fields, with debates found in examples such as the political and legal field (immigration policies, the anthrax scare, exporting democracy as an ideological practice, justifications for criminal law reform), science (the drive to determine genetic relationships, infectious diseases, global health), financial markets (the global trade of consumer goods, system crashes), culture and religion (changes in family structures, urban population shifts, viral marketing techniques, educational system overhaul and discussions around gender and sexuality). These debates are reimagined and rearticulated within cultural texts, and in turn, these texts provide the scaffolding for further cultural and political practices. This course will be organized around a number of interdisciplinary questions and texts. What is the scientific or medicalized understanding of contagion, and what does this historical narrative require of certain bodies and places? Does the idea of infection require an understanding of consent? What kinds of bodies are assumed to be infected, and alternatively, what kinds of bodies are assumed to be at risk? Can infected bodies ever become clean again? Is infection inherently a gendered concept, and what might that mean for both infection and gender? Is gender contagious, or simply a contagious concept, and what might that difference entail? Dirty bodies cross the boundary between clean citizens and contaminated others; this rupture calls attention to the ecology of the public, the permeability of boundaries, the violent requirements of capital, and the gendered notion of the citizen-subject. Does contagion – bodies infecting each other – provide a method of going beyond reproductive narratives of what happens when bodies come into contact? Does contagion rely on certain notions of permeable subjects and bodies, and are sexed bodies a requirement of this? Can contagion exist if we rearticulate bodies to be inherently porous, impure, and what might be the result of this kind of understanding? The dominant mode of contagion one that privileges the moment of transmission and the power/fear of one body enacting power on another. This class will ask what might happen if we rearticulate bodily contact as one of possible reformation, rearticulation, reconstituted beings; what if the moment of contact was not one of possible challenge but one of co-constitutive production of possibility? Since contagion seems to rely on secure formations of identity, does an alternate account for bodily contact produce an alternative being or community?

CULANTH 290S
Was: CULANTH 180S.04
Barnett, Fiona UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Infected: Bodies, Culture, and Politics

Exposure, outbreak, contamination, infection, transmission, cleanliness, pollution. Why is the narrative of contagion and infection so useful as both a description of events and fear of the unknown? Who is infected, by whom, with what? This class will underscore that language matters: contagion is not just a neutral description of how something spreads. On the contrary, it requires an understanding of borders and boundaries, and how they might get crossed or punctured. Contagion produces both clean subjects and dirty subjects, and it highlights how one infects the other. Understanding how an object, body, language, idea or culture travels – through time, place, language and other social connections – requires careful consideration of both how we understand (and write about) the past and how we anticipate (and produce) the future. Contagion is not a contemporary invention; it has both a long history and the ability to regenerate itself depending on the historical moment. Contagion currently functions as a narrative or justification in a massive array of fields, with debates found in examples such as the political and legal field (immigration policies, the anthrax scare, exporting democracy as an ideological practice, justifications for criminal law reform), science (the drive to determine genetic relationships, infectious diseases, global health), financial markets (the global trade of consumer goods, system crashes), culture and religion (changes in family structures, urban population shifts, viral marketing techniques, educational system overhaul and discussions around gender and sexuality). These debates are reimagined and rearticulated within cultural texts, and in turn, these texts provide the scaffolding for further cultural and political practices. This course will be organized around a number of interdisciplinary questions and texts. What is the scientific or medicalized understanding of contagion, and what does this historical narrative require of certain bodies and places? Does the idea of infection require an understanding of consent? What kinds of bodies are assumed to be infected, and alternatively, what kinds of bodies are assumed to be at risk? Can infected bodies ever become clean again? Is infection inherently a gendered concept, and what might that mean for both infection and gender? Is gender contagious, or simply a contagious concept, and what might that difference entail? Dirty bodies cross the boundary between clean citizens and contaminated others; this rupture calls attention to the ecology of the public, the permeability of boundaries, the violent requirements of capital, and the gendered notion of the citizen-subject. Does contagion – bodies infecting each other – provide a method of going beyond reproductive narratives of what happens when bodies come into contact? Does contagion rely on certain notions of permeable subjects and bodies, and are sexed bodies a requirement of this? Can contagion exist if we rearticulate bodies to be inherently porous, impure, and what might be the result of this kind of understanding? The dominant mode of contagion one that privileges the moment of transmission and the power/fear of one body enacting power on another. This class will ask what might happen if we rearticulate bodily contact as one of possible reformation, rearticulation, reconstituted beings; what if the moment of contact was not one of possible challenge but one of co-constitutive production of possibility? Since contagion seems to rely on secure formations of identity, does an alternate account for bodily contact produce an alternative being or community?

CULANTH 290S
Was: CULANTH 180S.04
Barnett, Fiona UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Infectious Disease

Covers the physiology and the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of a suite of infectious diseases. Case studies will include measles, influenza, dengue, cholera, Lyme disease, herpes, tuberculosis, and rabies, among others, with an emphasis on pathogens infecting humans. Topics include: basic immunology, the physiology of different disease processes and transmission, the role of population size on disease transmission, the effects of climate and behavioral changes on disease dynamics, networks of disease spread, spatial spread of disease, evolution of virulence, antigenic evolution, emerging infectious diseases. Koelle and Johnsen.

BIOLOGY 365
Was: BIOLOGY 146
Koelle, Katharina Johnsen, Sonke UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Infectious Disease

Covers the physiology and the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of a suite of infectious diseases. Case studies will include measles, influenza, dengue, cholera, Lyme disease, herpes, tuberculosis, and rabies, among others, with an emphasis on pathogens infecting humans. Topics include: basic immunology, the physiology of different disease processes and transmission, the role of population size on disease transmission, the effects of climate and behavioral changes on disease dynamics, networks of disease spread, spatial spread of disease, evolution of virulence, antigenic evolution, emerging infectious diseases. Koelle and Johnsen.

BIOLOGY 365
Was: BIOLOGY 146
Koelle, Katharina Johnsen, Sonke UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Integrated Environmental Design

Student design teams complete a preliminary design of an actual environmental engineering project and present the design to a panel of civil engineering faculty and practitioners. A written technical report is required. Topics to be addressed include: the design process; cost estimation; legal, ethical, and social aspects of professional engineering practice; short-term and long-term design serviceability considerations. Open only to civil engineering students during their final two semesters. Prerequisites: Civil Engineering 120L, 123L, 124L.

CE 469
Was: CE 193
Schaad, David UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Methods
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
GHC: Elective
International Law and Global Health

This course will examine where and how international law intersects with global health inequalities. In what instances has international law been a positive force for addressing these inequalities and when has the law itself compounded and extended the problem? Through two or three case studies, students will be challenged to critically assess whether the law — and what particular bodies of law — would be the most appropriate. For example, if the families of working coffee farmers in the Sidamo region of Ethiopia are suffering from severe malnutrition while western coffee consumers pay top dollar for a bag of roasted Sidamo label beans, what legal regimes might apply? Having a basic grasp of a handful of leading rules systems (human rights, trade, intellectual property, among others), students will then be asked to consider the legal, political and ethical merits of pursuing better health outcomes through resort to the law. We will consider the law as lawyers must — attending to the technical elements and complexities — but we will also seek to understand the extent to which the law's power resides as much in its political punch or moral appeal. In short, the course will work to situate international law and global health in the stream of strategic choices available to those who call for better health by demanding greater justice.

PUBPOL 190FS
Was: PUBPOL 81FCS
Admay, Catherine UG Only FALL 2010 MINOR: Elective
GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
Introduction to Epidemiology (Graduate Course)

(Currently offered at UNC-CH)

Course Notes
NO LONGER COUNTS AS GHC METHODS. Counts as Methods only if taken prior to Fall 2009.
EPH 600
Was: EPH 600
Maselko, Joanna UG/GRAD SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
Introduction to Epidemiology: Focus on Global Health

Introduces students to the main concepts and methods used in population-based epidemiology research. Topics covered include measures of disease frequency, study design, measures of association, and problems of bias, especially as they pertain to global health research. Students will learn to understand and evaluate epidemiological studies. A prior quantitative course is highly recommended.

GLHLTH 362
Was: GLHLTH 161
Maselko, Joanna UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Introduction to Global Health
Crosslisted as INTERDIS 110B GLHLTH 161

Introduction to multidisciplinary theories and techniques for assessing and addressing global, infectious, chronic, and behavioral health problems. Global health issues addressed from perspectives such as: epidemiology, biology, engineering, environment, business, human rights, nursing, psychology, law, public policy, and economics.

Course Notes
Course titled as "Multidisciplinary Approaches to Global Health" prior to fall 2012.
PUBPOL 166
Was: PUBPOL 154
Whetten, Kathryn UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Intro
MINOR: Fundamentals
MAJOR: Core – Fundamentals
Introductory Demographic Measures and Concepts

This is an introductory course in demographic concepts, measures and techniques. The primary objective is to learn how demographers measure population change, mortality, morbidity, fertility, marriage, divorce, and migration. The course also illustrates the broader application of demographic measurement and techniques to other aspects of society and population health, such as educational attainment, labor force participation, linkages between mortality, morbidity and disability, and health and mortality differentials. The understanding of the materials is aided by a series of problem sets which are designed to help students learn to apply demographic methods.

GLHLTH 530S
Was: GLHLTH 250
Merli, Maria-Giovanna UG/GRAD FALL 2010 MSC: Elective
GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Social Determinants
MINOR: Elective
Issues of healing and caring for underserved populations: A global perspective with an emphasis on Haiti

GLHLTH 211 is a course taught through the partnership of a local nonprofit organization, Family Health Ministries and the Duke Global Health Institute. The course examines issues related to health and healing in underserved populations through an integrated lens of medicine, public health, poverty, clinical research, culture, environment and theology. This lens provides students with an opportunity to examine health from the perspective of both individuals and communities and to explore societal factors that contribute to the process of healing. As an interdisciplinary course, medical, nursing, divinity, undergraduate students, and others also work together to ‘critically examine’ the process of providing culturally relevant assistance to underserved communities.

GLHLTH 393S
Was: GLHLTH 211S
Walmer, David UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Medical Anthropology
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 321T

Cross cultural experiences and understanding of health and illness, the body and non-biological aspects of medicine. Culture-specific sickness (like envidia, running amok, attention deficit disorder). Class, race, and gender inflected experiences of health. Various societies' organization of health care specialists, including biomedical doctors, voudon priestesses, and shamans.

CULANTH 424T
Was: CULANTH 191U/T
Staff UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Ethics
GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MAJOR: Foundations – Humanities
Microbial Ecology and Evolution

Survey of new advances in the field of environmental and evolutionary microbiology, based on current literature, discussion, and laboratory exercises. Topics to include bacterial phylogeny, molecular ecology, emerging infectious diseases, bacterial symbiosis, experimental evolution, evolution of drug resistance, and microbial genomics. Prerequisite: Biology 25L, 103L, 118, or consent of instructor. Instructor: Vilgalys. 4 units.

BIOLOGY 557L
Was: BIOLOGY 211L
Staff UG/GRAD FALL 2010 MSC: Elective
Microbial Pathogenesis

Modern molecular genetic approaches to understanding the pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Underlying mechanisms of pathogenesis and host-parasite relationships that contribute to the infectious disease process.

MGM 582
Was: MGM 282
McCusker, John UG/GRAD SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Nation, Region and Global Economy

The changing configuration of global capitalism, with emphasis on comparing global regions of North America, Latin America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. The internal dynamics of these regions, including the development strategies of selected nations, interregional comparisons (for example, regional divisions of labor, state-society relationships, the nature of their business systems, quality of life issues). Research paper required.

SOCIOL 345
Was: SOCIOL 145
Christian, Michelle UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Natural Catastrophes: Rebuilding The Ruins

Research Service Learning Gateway course where students will conduct a life cycle analysis of natural disasters. Invited experts will discuss meteorologic, hydrologic and geologic factors that cause disasters; explore how societies plan and/or respond to the immediate and long-term physical, social, emotional and spiritual issues associated with survival; and present case studies of response, recovery and reconstruction efforts. Students will attend the lecture component of the course and complete on-line quizzes to demonstrate understanding of the material presented. For the service learning experience, students will carry out response activities over Spring Break in an area ravaged by a natural disaster. They will keep a journal (audio and written) of their activities, write a brief synopsis (4-5 pages), and make a group oral presentation of their findings following their return. They will also submit a hypothetical research proposal for a project which might stem from the course and their experiences. Research Service Learning Gateway course where students will conduct a life cycle analysis of natural disasters. Invited experts will discuss meteorologic, hydrologic and geologic factors that cause disasters; explore how societies plan and/or respond to the immediate and long-term physical, social, emotional and spiritual issues associated with survival; and present case studies of response, recovery and reconstruction efforts. Students will attend the lecture component of the course and complete on-line quizzes to demonstrate understanding of the material presented. For the service learning experience, students will carry out response activities over Spring Break in an area ravaged by a natural disaster. They will keep a journal (audio and written) of their activities, write a brief synopsis (4-5 pages), and make a group oral presentation of their findings following their return. They will also submit a hypothetical research proposal for a project which might stem from the course and their experiences.

EGR 261
Was: EGR 61
Schaad, David UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Natural Catastrophes: Rebuilding The Ruins

Research Service Learning Gateway course where students will conduct a life cycle analysis of natural disasters. Invited experts will discuss meteorologic, hydrologic and geologic factors that cause disasters; explore how societies plan and/or respond to the immediate and long-term physical, social, emotional and spiritual issues associated with survival; and present case studies of response, recovery and reconstruction efforts. Students will attend the lecture component of the course and complete on-line quizzes to demonstrate understanding of the material presented. For the service learning experience, students will carry out response activities over Spring Break in an area ravaged by a natural disaster. They will keep a journal (audio and written) of their activities, write a brief synopsis (4-5 pages), and make a group oral presentation of their findings following their return. They will also submit a hypothetical research proposal for a project which might stem from the course and their experiences. Research Service Learning Gateway course where students will conduct a life cycle analysis of natural disasters. Invited experts will discuss meteorologic, hydrologic and geologic factors that cause disasters; explore how societies plan and/or respond to the immediate and long-term physical, social, emotional and spiritual issues associated with survival; and present case studies of response, recovery and reconstruction efforts. Students will attend the lecture component of the course and complete on-line quizzes to demonstrate understanding of the material presented. For the service learning experience, students will carry out response activities over Spring Break in an area ravaged by a natural disaster. They will keep a journal (audio and written) of their activities, write a brief synopsis (4-5 pages), and make a group oral presentation of their findings following their return. They will also submit a hypothetical research proposal for a project which might stem from the course and their experiences.

EGR 261
Was: EGR 61
Schaad, David UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Population, Health, and Policy
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 590

Substantive findings and policies/policy debates around selected topics in the field of population and health in industrialized and developing societies. Demographic models used to examine selected current population and health topics through framing, defining and evaluating key concepts. Topics include: end of population growth; relations between population, development and environment; health of populations; population aging; potentials for mortality increases; HIV/AIDS epidemic and resurgence of infectious diseases. Readings from disciplines of demography, sociology and public health.

PUBPOL 633
Was: PUBPOL 224
Merli, Maria-Giovanna UG/GRAD FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Poverty Inequality and Health
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 644S
AAAS 548S
Was: AAAS 229S
James, Sherman UG/GRAD FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Quantitative Method I

Course introduces principles of epidemiology, including disease frequency measures; measures of association; observational, experimental, and quasi-experimental study designs; validity -- confounding, selection bias, measurement error; reliability. Course interweaves introductory biostatistics for continuous and categorical variables. Course has a data analysis lab section in which students walk through a guided data analysis on a provided data set, such as Demographic and Health Surveys.

GLHLTH 705
Was: GLHLTH 320
Pence, Brian GRAD Only FALL 2010 MSC: Core
Race, Genomics, and Society
Crosslisted as AAAS 190FS

Integrated analysis of historical and contemporary aspects of `race and genetics/genomics'. Focus on relevant applications in science, medicine, and society; develop skills required for scientific, sociopolitical, cultural, psychosocial, and ethical evaluation of issues. Topics include: introduction to population genetics/genetic variation; concepts and definitions of race; overview of bioethics; social and political history of race; genomics and health disparities; race, ancestry, and medical practice; genealogy, genetic ancestry, and identity; public perceptions of race and genetics/genomics. Instructor: Royal

GENOME 258S
Was: GENOME 158S.03
Staff UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Research Methods in Global Health

Introduction to methodological techniques used in global health research, including qualitative field work, quantitative surveys, experimental designs, intervention trials, and program evaluation. Teaches strengths and weaknesses of each method, and how to determine the most appropriate method for specific research questions. Takes a problem-based approach, emphasizing the interdisciplinary nature of global health research. Focuses on how to evaluate published & unpublished research and how to design a global health research project. Skills include: identification of global health problems, conceptualization of a research question, designing a research study, and interpretation of results.

Course Notes
For students who matriculated at Duke in Fall 2009 or later, this is the only Methods course approved for the GHC. Students who matriculated at Duke prior to Fall 2009 will have had other options to fulfill the GHC Methods requirement.
GLHLTH 371
Was: GLHLTH 163
Meade, Christina UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Methods
GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Core – Research
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Research Methods in Global Health

Introduction to methodological techniques used in global health research, including qualitative field work, quantitative surveys, experimental designs, intervention trials, and program evaluation. Teaches strengths and weaknesses of each method, and how to determine the most appropriate method for specific research questions. Takes a problem-based approach, emphasizing the interdisciplinary nature of global health research. Focuses on how to evaluate published & unpublished research and how to design a global health research project. Skills include: identification of global health problems, conceptualization of a research question, designing a research study, and interpretation of results.

Course Notes
For students who matriculated at Duke in Fall 2009 or later, this is the only Methods course approved for the GHC. Students who matriculated at Duke prior to Fall 2009 will have had other options to fulfill the GHC Methods requirement.
GLHLTH 371
Was: GLHLTH 163
Ariely, Sumedha UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Methods
GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Core – Research
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Research Practicum- Costa Rica

Introduces students to research design, field methods, and basic data analysis in a tropical context. Skills include hypothesis testing and statistical analysis, orientation to basic software packages, write and present scientific papers, and design and conduct epidemiologic research.

Course Notes
Course taught as part of the Costa Rica-Global Health study abroad program offered through OTS.
GLHLTH 380A
Was: GLHLTH 172
Benavides Rawson, Jorge UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Research Practicum- Costa Rica

Introduces students to research design, field methods, and basic data analysis in a tropical context. Skills include hypothesis testing and statistical analysis, orientation to basic software packages, write and present scientific papers, and design and conduct epidemiologic research.

Course Notes
Course taught as part of the Costa Rica-Global Health study abroad program offered through OTS.
GLHLTH 380A
Was: GLHLTH 172
Benavides Rawson, Jorge UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Resource Environmental Policy/environmental Politics
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 577

Environmental policy
formation and implementation in comparative perspective. Topics include interest groups, environmental movements
and parties, public opinion, political systems and institutions. Case students selected from the United States and other advanced industrialized countries and the developing world. Spring.

ENVIRON 577
Was: ENVIRON 274
Weinthal, Erika UG/GRAD SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Social Change, Markets, and Economy in China

Introduction to recent economic, social, and institutional changes in China, with focus on recent (post 1980) periods. Up-to-date descriptive reviews, empirical data, and discussions on historical background, current status, and future perspectives. Instructor: Yi

ECON 542S
Was: ECON 269S - 05
Staff UG/GRAD FALL 2010
Social Determinants of U.S. Health Disparities

Introduction to how social factors influence health and well-being, with a particular focus on contemporary U.S. society. Topics include obesity, aging, socioeconomic disadvantage, access to health insurance, public health systems, the role of the media, and racial/ethnic and gender inequalities. The course will provide descriptive assessments of health inequalities and analytic examinations of the mechanisms through which social factors affect health.

SOCIOL 361
Was: SOCIOL 161
Read, Jen'nan UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Social Determinants
Special Topics Research Design
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 390S

This interdisciplinary course is designed to help students transform their summer engagement experience into meaningful research questions that will frame a future senior thesis. Both reflective and proactive, students will work collectively to build upon summer engagement experiences (international or domestic, DukeEngage or Study Abroad). Each student will identify an academic literature to interrogate, critically assess and interpret one’s own experiences, and develop a research design for a thesis. This course will present students with a twofold opportunity: to analyze and compare their immersion in foreign cultures immediately on their return, and prepare for a future senior thesis grounded on data and experience. The primary target group is Rising Juniors returning from either study abroad, Duke Engage or other scholarship-affiliated, research- or service-related summer experiences.

CULANTH 290S
Was: CULANTH 180S
Staff UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
Special Topics Statistics For Policy Makers

The purpose of this course is to ensure that students are both critical consumers and effective producers of statistical evidence presented in support of policy arguments. Upon completing this course, students will have the capacity to analyze and evaluate arguments based on simple descriptive statistics, correlation, or multiple regression analysis. Students will also receive hand-on training in the creation of convincing statistical reports, from manipulating large datasets to conduction sensitivity analysis and presenting results.

PUBPOL 812
Was: PUBPOL 312
Frankenberg, Elizabeth GRAD Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Special Topics The Social Epidemiology of Obesity

This Focus course is designed to broadly examine the causes and consequences of obesity, both domestically and abroad, using a social epidemiological perspective. Accordingly, heavy emphasis will be placed on understanding the influence of social determinants on obesity, common obesity-related comorbidities, and sociodemographic disparities in obesity. Students will become familiar with common social epidemiologic methods, so that they can interpret and critically analyze findings in the obesity research literature. Special emphasis will be placed on behavioral and policy-oriented obesity intervention solutions, as well as the handling of the obesity epidemic in popular culture.

Course Notes
Focus Course
GLHLTH 170FS
Was: GLHLTH 90FCS
Bennett, Gary UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Special Topics- Seminar Design Innovation and Global Health

In this age of globalization, the expectations of life-saving technologies cross borders readily, but the introduction and adaptation of these technologies in resource-limited settings often lag behind. While we often think of technologies such as AIDS drugs, there are many appropriate technologies that are potentially transformative for improving local health – making water potable, cookstoves more efficient and less polluting, and diagnostics more available in local clinics. Behind each of these technologies, there are innovators, sometimes publicly funded researchers, other times private companies, often social entrepreneurs.
In this course, students will critically examine the policy and philanthropic landscape behind these areas of appropriate technology. Beyond the engineering of these technologies, what is the social engineering of policies that minimize inequity? For example, is potable water best tackled with an innovation that serves the needs of an individual (e.g., Life Straw), a group (e.g., solar disinfectant system), or an entire community (e.g., chlorination of a local reservoir). Through the lens of these technologies, students will consider what factors help enable local innovation, from intellectual and financial capital to end-user input and systems for sharing and owning knowledge. What forms of philanthropy – from microcredit and giving circles to donor aid – work best to foster local innovation and to build local capacity? What are the ethical issues involved in introducing technologies, from double standards in quality to donor-recipient relationships? This course seeks to prepare those engaged in such work to consider the policy ramifications of designing innovation for global health.

PUBPOL 590S
Was: PUBPOL 264S.32
So, Anthony UG/GRAD SPRING 2010 MSC: Elective
Survey of Environmental Health and Safety

Environmental risks from the perspective of global ecology, biology, chemistry, and radiation. The nature and scope of environmental hazards, environmental impacts and health effects, and risk assessment and management strategies. Open to undergraduates by consent. Instructor: Thomann. 3 units.

ENVIRON 547
Was: ENVIRON 247
Thomann, Wayne UG/GRAD SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Tropical Medicine - Costa Rica

Part of a 15-week semester abroad program in Costa Rica (through OTS). Integrates classroom and field instruction to introduce fundamental principles of tropical medicine and public health including the tropical environment and its related health issues

GLHLTH 383A
Was: GLHLTH 171
Benavides Rawson, Jorge UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Tropical Medicine - Costa Rica

Part of a 15-week semester abroad program in Costa Rica (through OTS). Integrates classroom and field instruction to introduce fundamental principles of tropical medicine and public health including the tropical environment and its related health issues

GLHLTH 383A
Was: GLHLTH 171
Benavides Rawson, Jorge UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Ungraded Research in Global Health

Individual research in a field of special interest, the central goal of which is a substantive paper containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Consent required.

GLHLTH 781
Was: GLHLTH 381
Staff GRAD Only FALL 2010 MSC: Thesis
US Environmental Policy
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 275

This course focuses on environmental policy issues
in the United States. We will consider the full range of the social sciences in our analysis, including the
political, economic, ethical, legal, and institutional issues involved in environmental decision-making. The
course will cover: the preservation and conservation movements, environmental priorities, the political
process, the formation of the EPA, the Clean Air Act, RCRA and superfund legislation, the Clean Water Act,
FIFRA, the Endangered Species Act, public lands policy, and institutional issues. The course is designed to
give students an understanding of the important conceptual issues in environmental policy-making, as well as an overview of current environmental legislation.

ENVIRON 212
Was: ENVIRON 149
Sossa, Genene UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
US Environmental Policy
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 275

This course focuses on environmental policy issues
in the United States. We will consider the full range of the social sciences in our analysis, including the
political, economic, ethical, legal, and institutional issues involved in environmental decision-making. The
course will cover: the preservation and conservation movements, environmental priorities, the political
process, the formation of the EPA, the Clean Air Act, RCRA and superfund legislation, the Clean Water Act,
FIFRA, the Endangered Species Act, public lands policy, and institutional issues. The course is designed to
give students an understanding of the important conceptual issues in environmental policy-making, as well as an overview of current environmental legislation.

ENVIRON 212
Was: ENVIRON 149
Sossa, Genene UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
US Health Disparities

The most commonly used indices to measure United States health disparities by race/ethnicity; origins and evolution of racial/ethnic categories in the United States Census; role of poverty, racial residential segregation, and inadequate health care in explaining racial/ethnic health disparities; and the promise and limitations of academic-community partnerships and public policy initiatives designed to reduce and ultimately eliminate those health disparities.

SOCIOL 361
Was: SOCIOL 129
Staff UG Only SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Virology and Viral Oncology MGM 552
Was: MGM 252
Staff UG/GRAD SPRING 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Vulnerable Populations and Global Health

Vulnerable Populations and Global Health explores the complex social, economic, institutional, and political factors contributing to the health disparities of vulnerable populations. Through a variety of compelling texts, this intensive seminar will explore the following questions: What constitutes a vulnerable population? How does the biopsychosocial model help to elucidate vulnerability as a determinant of health? How does the complex interaction of agency and constraint contribute to the global health disparities of vulnerable populations? What special considerations do interventions with vulnerable population require? What can vulnerable populations teach us about improving global health outcomes? And what role should social justice and human rights play in global health? Course format will primarily be discussion.

GLHLTH 171FS
Was: GLHLTH 165FCS
Boyd, David UG Only FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Water, Cooperation, and Conflict

Focuses on potential for transboundary water resources-related conflict and cooperation. Discusses water scarcity concepts, natural resource conflict theory, hydro politics, hydro hegemony, water security, water markets and institutions, game theory, and international water law. Other topics include the economics of water and health. Case studies complement the broader course outlook. Taught by Marc Jeuland, cross-listed in ENVIRON.

PUBPOL 580S
Was: PUBPOL 264S
Staff UG/GRAD FALL 2010 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective