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Faculty

Sumedha Ariely

Assistant Professor of the Practice, Global Health

Trent 211
(919) 681-7944
sumi.ariely@duke.edu

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Sumi Ariely

Summary

Sumi Ariely serves as an Assistant Professor of the Practice in Global Health at Duke University and teaches the global health research methods and global health ethics course. Dr. Ariely holds a PhD in Psychology with a focus on cognitive development and culture. She has been active in applied and basic research in the past and has international experience with global and public health issues in a variety of contexts. Ariely lived in West-Africa for two years during which she worked on maternal and child health care and with communities at risk for HIV/AIDS exposure. As a developmental psychologist she is interested in the relations between cultural, social, and biological influences on development and health decisions and outcomes. Dr. Ariely has mentored a large variety of research and service projects in the US, Africa and Asia, and is involved in research examining the transition orphans and vulnerable children make from institutions to communities in Ethiopia.

Before coming to Duke, she was at MIT where she taught classes in developmental psychology, seminars on research and assessment, and served as advisor to MBA students interning as social entrepreneur consultants for local and international NGOs.

Teaching

Title Number Level Semester Requirements Fulfilled
Research Methods in Global Health
Crosslisted as PSY 309

Introduction to methodological techniques used in global health research, including qualitative field work, quantitative surveys, experimental designs, intervention trials, and program evaluation. Teaches strengths and weaknesses of each method, and how to determine the most appropriate method for specific research questions. Takes a problem-based approach, emphasizing the interdisciplinary nature of global health research. Focuses on how to evaluate published & unpublished research and how to design a global health research project. Skills include: identification of global health problems, conceptualization of a research question, designing a research study, and interpretation of results.

Course Notes:
For students who matriculated at Duke in Fall 2009 or later, this is the only Methods course approved for the GHC. Students who matriculated at Duke prior to Fall 2009 will have had other options to fulfill the GHC Methods requirement.
GLHLTH 371
Was: GLHLTH 163
UG Only FALL 2017 MAJOR: Core - Research
MINOR: Elective
Research Methods in Global Health

Introduction to methodological techniques used in global health research, including qualitative field work, quantitative surveys, experimental designs, intervention trials, and program evaluation. Teaches strengths and weaknesses of each method, and how to determine the most appropriate method for specific research questions. Takes a problem-based approach, emphasizing the interdisciplinary nature of global health research. Focuses on how to evaluate published & unpublished research and how to design a global health research project. Skills include: identification of global health problems, conceptualization of a research question, designing a research study, and interpretation of results.

Course Notes:
For students who matriculated at Duke in Fall 2009 or later, this is the only Methods course approved for the GHC. Students who matriculated at Duke prior to Fall 2009 will have had other options to fulfill the GHC Methods requirement.
GLHLTH 371
Was: GLHLTH 163
UG Only FALL 2016 MAJOR: Core - Research
MINOR: Elective

Projects

Recent Publications

Modi, K., Akhtar, M Ariely, S., & Gupta, D. (2016). Addressing Challenges of Transition from Children’s Home to Independence: Udayan Care’s Udayan Ghars (Sunshine Children’s Homes) & Aftercare Programme. Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care 2016 — Vol.15, No.1

Whetten K; Ostermann J; Pence BW; Whetten RA; Messer LC; Ariely S; O'Donnell K; Wasonga AI; Vann V; Itemba D; Eticha M; Madan I; Thielman NM (2014). Three-year change in the wellbeing of orphaned and separated children in institutional and family-based care settings in five low- and middle-income countries. PLoS ONE 9(8): e104872. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0104872

Moxley, C., McKelway, M., Truong, S., Nakafeero, R., Kigongo, C., & Ariely, S. (2014). A path to sustainable treatments for orphaned and vulnerable children: lessons from community-based efforts in Uganda. Institutionalized Children Explorations and Beyond, Vol 1 (2), 193-203.