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Doubly disenfranchised? How Race/Ethnicity and Religiosity Shape Muslim American Political Incorporation

Project Objectives

This study will draw from the only existing nationally representative data on Muslim Americans to identify the factors that influence their political incorporation. Building on theories of raciallethnic and immigrant political incorporation, this study will examine the extent to which South Asian, Arab, and African American Muslims differ in their political attitudes and behaviors and assess whether and how socioeconomic, demographic, and cultural differences between these groups explain observed variations in their attitudes and behaviors. Further, this study will expand theories on the religion-politics connection by examining how different dimensions of religious identity (e.g., personal, organizational, and political) affect their political incorporation.

The primary purpose of the study is to examine the factors that influence the political incorporation of Muslim Americans and assess whether and how this varies by racial and ethnic group membership. Specifically, the project aims to answer four related questions:

1. To what extent do South Asian, Arab, and African American Muslims differ in their political attitudes and behaviors?
2. To what extent do socioeconomic, demographic, and cultural differences between these groups explain observed variations in their attitudes and behaviors?
3. To what extent do different dimensions of religious identity (e.g., personal, organizational, and political) affect their political incorporation? and
4. To what extent do the factors that produce differences between groups generate differences within each group?

Topics

Faculty

Department & School

Sociology
Trinity College of Arts and Sciences

Locations

Sponsors

  • Russell Sage Foundation

Project Status

Completed

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