Courses

Graduate Courses

Title Number Instructor Level Semester Requirements Fulfilled
Global Health Capstone

Capstone Course for students in Global Health Certificate and the Global Health Major. Group analysis of a current global health problem/issue. Project involves background research, data acquisition, analysis, writing, and presentation of a substantial research paper/report at an advanced level. Consent of instructor required. Capstone Course for students in Global Health Certificate. Group analysis of a current global health problem/issue. Project involves background research, data acquisition, analysis, writing, and presentation of a substantial research paper/report at an advanced level. Consent of program director required.

Course Notes
Course number was GLHLTH 255S prior to spring 2010. Course is no longer offered as a seminar.
GLHLTH 501
Was: GLHLTH 255
Boyd, David UG/GRAD SPRING 2016 MAJOR: Senior Seminar
Water, Cooperation, and Conflict

Focuses on potential for transboundary water resources-related conflict and cooperation. Discusses water scarcity concepts, natural resource conflict theory, hydro politics, hydro hegemony, water security, water markets and institutions, game theory, and international water law. Other topics include the economics of water and health. Case studies complement the broader course outlook. Focuses on potential for transboundary water resources-related conflict and cooperation. Discusses water scarcity concepts, natural resource conflict theory, hydro politics, hydro hegemony, water security, water markets and institutions, game theory, and international water law. Other topics include the economics of water and health. Case studies complement the broader course outlook.

PUBPOL 580S
Was: PUBPOL 264S
Jeuland, Marc UG/GRAD SPRING 2016 MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Water Quality Health

Explore basic concepts of water quality and human health with focus on the global water cycle, global water demand and availability, chemical properties of water, contaminants in water, health implications, and environmental isotope hydrology. Highlights relationships between human activities, water scarcity, water quality degradation, and ecological and health consequences. Addresses some policy implications related to conflicts over water resources and impact of energy production on water resources. Prerequisites: prior knowledge of introductory calculus and chemistry or consent of instructor.

EOS 524
Vengosh, Avner UG/GRAD SPRING 2016 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MSC: Elective
Special Topics: Economics of Global Health

No course description available

GLHLTH 690
Sloan, Frank UG/GRAD SPRING 2016 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Health Capstone

Capstone Course for students in Global Health Certificate and the Global Health Major. Group analysis of a current global health problem/issue. Project involves background research, data acquisition, analysis, writing, and presentation of a substantial research paper/report at an advanced level. Consent of instructor required. Capstone Course for students in Global Health Certificate. Group analysis of a current global health problem/issue. Project involves background research, data acquisition, analysis, writing, and presentation of a substantial research paper/report at an advanced level. Consent of program director required.

Course Notes
Course number was GLHLTH 255S prior to spring 2010. Course is no longer offered as a seminar.
GLHLTH 501
Was: GLHLTH 255
Clements, Dennis UG/GRAD FALL 2016 MAJOR: Senior Seminar
Introductory Demographic Measures and Concepts

This is an introductory course in demographic concepts, measures and techniques. The primary objective is to learn how demographers measure population change, mortality, morbidity, fertility, marriage, divorce, and migration. The course also illustrates the broader application of demographic measurement and techniques to other aspects of society and population health, such as educational attainment, labor force participation, linkages between mortality, morbidity and disability, and health and mortality differentials. The understanding of the materials is aided by a series of problem sets which are designed to help students learn to apply demographic methods.

GLHLTH 530S
Was: GLHLTH 250
Merli, Maria-Giovanna UG/GRAD FALL 2016 MSC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Methods
MAJOR: Focused Study
Global Mental Health GLHLTH 660
Was: GLHLTH 223S
Kohrt, Brandon UG/GRAD FALL 2016 MSC: Elective
PhD: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Nutrition: Over and Under Nutrition in Developing Countries

Discusses the nutrition problems of developing countries. Reviews epidemiological, biological, and behavioral consequences of both overnutrition (e.g., obesity) and undernutrition (e.g., malnutrition). Emphasizes infectious disease (HIV, TB, malaria, diarrhea) of children and perinatal outcomes (e.g., fetal loss, low birth weight, HIV transmission, pre-eclampsia) of women and children. Strong focus on ethical and political issues relevant to the formulation of nutrition policy and programs in developing countries. Course is designed for graduate students or advanced undergraduates.

GLHLTH 670S
Was: GLHLTH 220S - 01
Steinberg, Dori UG/GRAD FALL 2016 MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Elective
Global Health Challenges

Course introduces major global health problems and social, behavioral, economic, biomedical and environmental determinants of health in resource limited settings. Topics include communicable diseases i.e. HIV, malaria, tuberculosis and common childhood diseases; chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and mental health; and determinants of health associated with these diseases, such as poverty, gender imbalance, culture, poor environmental sanitation, malnutrition, tobacco use, and climate change. Other topics may include health promotion, reproductive health, maternal and child health, and disaster preparedness.

GLHLTH 701
Was: GLHLTH 310
Woods, Chris GRAD Only FALL 2016 MSC: Core
PhD: Core
Global Health Research: Design and Practice

Course provides a foundation in study design, research question development, field implementation, measurement, validity and reliability. Quantitative and qualitative research approaches are examined. Students build critical skills in reading, interpreting and synthesizing scientific literature. The selection of appropriate measurements and survey development is emphasized and issues in field implementation explored.

GLHLTH 702
Was: GLHLTH 321
Green, Eric GRAD Only FALL 2016 MSC: Core
Biostatistics and Epidemiology for Global Health

Course introduces principles of epidemiology, including disease frequency measures; measures of association; observational, experimental, and quasi-experimental study designs; validity -- confounding, selection bias, measurement error; reliability. Course interweaves introductory biostatistics for continuous and categorical variables. Course has a data analysis lab section in which students walk through a guided data analysis on a provided data set, such as Demographic and Health Surveys.

GLHLTH 705
Was: GLHLTH 320
Turner, Elizabeth GRAD Only FALL 2016 MSC: Core
PhD: Methods
Non-Communicable Diseases

Course will provide an overview of the recent (mid-20th century to the present) trends in non-communicable disease epidemiology. Focus on four major non-communicable disease categories as separate modules: cardiovascular, oncologic, diabetic and pulmonary diseases. Case studies used to highlight selected geographic differences. By using lectures, assigned readings and classroom discussion the course aims to provide the student with a firm understanding of the shifting disease burden and the landscape of stakeholders and interventions to prevent the same.

GLHLTH 641
Bloomfield, Gerald UG/GRAD FALL 2016 PhD: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Health Doctoral Certificate Seminar

This seminar is required for the Global Health Doctoral Certificate. Its contents will vary by semester but may include a combination of journal club, discussions with experts at Duke or external visitors, research presentations, and dissertation discussions.

GLHLTH 870S
Sikkema, Kathleen GRAD Only FALL 2016 PhD: Core
Global Surgical Care

nLack of access to surgical care threatens the health of people throughout the world%u2019s poorest regions, and impacts all areas of health care. This seminar will address issues surrounding the delivery of surgical and anesthesia care in low- and middle income countries for students and clinical trainees in global health. This course will focus on surgical care delivery and management; workforce, training, and education; and economics and finance. The content of this course will be based on the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery report and support materials. The format will be a weekly seminar, readings, and case studies. Instructor: Rice

GLHLTH 673S
Rice, Henry UG/GRAD FALL 2016 MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
PhD: Elective
MSC: Elective
Global Environmental Health: Economics and Policy

Social science perspective on global environmental health. Students will learn to identify primary environmental causes of high burden diseases such as malaria, diarrhea, and respiratory infections; describe how to measure socio-economic impacts of global environmental health diseases; discuss key policies to control global environmental health problems based on private prevention and therapeutic behaviors; and propose frameworks to empirically monitor and evaluate global environmental health policies. A sub-module will focus on climate change and water-borne diseases. Prerequisites: Intro course in statistics.

GLHLTH 538
Was: GLHLTH 238
Pattanayak, Subhrendu UG/GRAD FALL 2016 MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Elective
Water, Cooperation, and Conflict

Focuses on potential for transboundary water resources-related conflict and cooperation. Discusses water scarcity concepts, natural resource conflict theory, hydro politics, hydro hegemony, water security, water markets and institutions, game theory, and international water law. Other topics include the economics of water and health. Case studies complement the broader course outlook

Course Notes
Crosslisted as Environ 580S
GLHLTH 533s
Jeuland, Marc UG/GRAD FALL 2016 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Elective
Ethics For Global Health Research

This course will present an overview of practical and theoretical approaches to bioethics from a range of perspectives, including the humanities, law, philosophy, medicine and science. Students will apply various resources, terminology and frameworks to case studies which will prepare them for their own research. The course will include IRB and responsible conduct of research. (2 credits)

GLHLTH 740
Was: GLHLTH 330
Stewart, Kearsley GRAD Only SPRING 2015 MSC: Core
PhD: Elective
Health Systems in Developing Countries

This course introduces students to key challenges faced in strengthening of health systems in low and middle income countries. The course will cover a diverse set of topics including an overview of organization of health systems, models of purchasing and providing health care, innovations in financing health care, and issues in service delivery such as quality of care and human resource challenges. Students will learn frameworks and methods employed in the evaluation of health systems. The course will also draw attention to resource allocation problems and various frameworks used to address them. The course will primarily rely on readings from a variety of health policy, economics and other social science journals. Course introduces key challenges faced in strengthening of health systems in low and middle income countries. Topics include: overview of organization of health systems, models of purchasing and providing health care, innovations in financing health care, issues in service delivery such as quality of care and human resource challenges, and frameworks and methods employed in the evaluation of health systems. Course will also draw attention to resource allocation problems and various frameworks used to address them. Readings primarily from health policy, economics and other social science journals. Consent of instructor required.

GLHLTH 750
Was: GLHLTH 340
Schulman, Kevin GRAD Only SPRING 2015 MSC: Core
PhD: Elective
Global Health Capstone

Capstone Course for students in Global Health Certificate and the Global Health Major. Group analysis of a current global health problem/issue. Project involves background research, data acquisition, analysis, writing, and presentation of a substantial research paper/report at an advanced level. Consent of instructor required. Capstone Course for students in Global Health Certificate. Group analysis of a current global health problem/issue. Project involves background research, data acquisition, analysis, writing, and presentation of a substantial research paper/report at an advanced level. Consent of program director required.

Course Notes
Course number was GLHLTH 255S prior to spring 2010. Course is no longer offered as a seminar.
GLHLTH 501
Was: GLHLTH 255
Clements, Dennis UG/GRAD SPRING 2015 MAJOR: Senior Seminar
Population and Environmental Dynamics and Human Health
Crosslisted as ENVIRON 637

Course examines population, health and environment (PHE) dynamics with focus on interactions in developing or transition economies. Theoretical and empirical approaches governing PHE dynamics from multidisciplinary perspectives, including geography, public health/epidemiology, demography, and economics. Students will obtain experience in design and analysis of PHE studies, and epidemiology of vector-born, chronic and enteric infections.

GLHLTH 637
Was: GLHLTH 237S
Pan, William UG/GRAD SPRING 2015 MSC: Elective
PhD: Elective
MSC: Methods
Designing Innovation for Global Health

In this age of globalization, the expectations of life-saving technologies cross borders readily, but the introduction and adaptation of these technologies in resource-limited settings often lag behind. While we often think of technologies such as AIDS drugs, there are many appropriate technologies that are potentially transformative for improving local health--making water potable, cookstoves more efficient and less polluting, and diagnostics more available in local clinics. Behind each of these technologies, there are innovators, sometimes publicly funded researchers, other times private companies, often social entrepreneurs. In this course, students will critically examine the policy and philanthropic landscape behind these areas of appropriate technology. Beyond the engineering of these technologies, what is the social engineering of policies that minimize inequity? For example, is potable water best tackled with an innovation that serves the needs of an individual (e.g., Life Straw), a group (e.g., solar disinfectant system), or an entire community (e.g., chlorination of a local reservoir). Through the lens of these technologies, students will consider what factors help enable local innovation, from intellectual and financial capital to end-user input and systems for sharing and owning knowledge. What forms of philanthropy—from microcredit and giving circles to donor aid—work best to foster local innovation and to build local capacity? What are the ethical issues involved in introducing technologies, from double standards in quality to donor-recipient relationships? This course seeks to prepare those engaged in such work to consider the policy ramifications of designing innovation for global health.

PUBPOL 642S
Was: PUBPOL 213
So, Anthony UG/GRAD SPRING 2015 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
One Health: From Philosophy to Practice

Interdisciplinary course introducing construct of One Health as increasingly important to a holistic understanding of prevention of disease and maintenance of health. Includes discussion of bidirectional impact of animal health on human health, impact of earth’s changing ecology on health. Learning objectives include 1) to describe how different disciplines contribute to the practice of One Health, 2) to creatively design interdisciplinary interventions to improve Global Health using a One Health model. Course will include weekly 2-hour multi-campus seminar off-site at NC Biotechnology Center with on-campus discussion section using case studies to supplement the seminar.
Interdisciplinary course introducing construct of One Health as increasingly important to a holistic understanding of prevention of disease and maintenance of health. Includes discussion of bidirectional impact of animal health on human health, impact of earth¿s changing ecology on health. Learning objectives include 1) to describe how different disciplines contribute to the practice of One Health, 2) to creatively design interdisciplinary interventions to improve Global Health using a One Health model. Course will include weekly 2-hour multi-campus seminar off-site at NC Biotechnology Center with on-campus discussion section using case studies to supplement the seminar.

GLHLTH 771
Was: GLHLTH 371
Pan, William Woods, Chris GRAD Only SPRING 2015 MSC: Elective
PhD: Elective
Ungraded Research in Global Health

Individual research in a field of special interest, the central goal of which is a substantive paper containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Consent required. Individual research in a field of special interest, the central goal of which is a substantive paper containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Consent required

GLHLTH 781
Was: GLHLTH 381
Woods, Chris GRAD Only SPRING 2015 MSC: Thesis
Water Quality Health

Explore basic concepts of water quality and human health with focus on the global water cycle, global water demand and availability, chemical properties of water, contaminants in water, health implications, and environmental isotope hydrology. Highlights relationships between human activities, water scarcity, water quality degradation, and ecological and health consequences. Addresses some policy implications related to conflicts over water resources and impact of energy production on water resources. Prerequisites: prior knowledge of introductory calculus and chemistry or consent of instructor.

EOS 524
Vengosh, Avner UG/GRAD SPRING 2015 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MSC: Elective
Water, Cooperation, and Conflict

Focuses on potential for transboundary water resources-related conflict and cooperation. Discusses water scarcity concepts, natural resource conflict theory, hydro politics, hydro hegemony, water security, water markets and institutions, game theory, and international water law. Other topics include the economics of water and health. Case studies complement the broader course outlook

Course Notes
Crosslisted as Environ 580S
GLHLTH 533s
Jeuland, Marc UG/GRAD SPRING 2015 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Elective
Intro to mHealth GLHLTH 590S
Vasudevan, Lavanya UG/GRAD SPRING 2015 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MSC: Elective
PhD: Elective
Global Health Supply and Organization

The course will begin with an overview of the methods of cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-benefit analysis with specific examples to illustrate how these methodologies have been used to assess specific technologies as well as barriers to their use, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. We then will focus on particular sectors%u2014starting with pharmaceuticals and vaccines followed by inpatient hospital care and ambulatory (outpatient) care. We will then devote an entire section of the course to quality of care, focusing on how it can and has been measured. After students have gained some familiarity with the parts of the health system, we will examine the attractiveness of various models of financing and provision, ranging from private sector financing and provision, mixed private sector and public financing and provision, and a fully public program of financing and provision.

ECON 690-01
Sloan, Frank UG/GRAD SPRING 2015 MSC: Elective
GHC: Methods
Global Health Research: Quantitative Methods II

Modular course building on Quantitative Methods I. Required module provides common understanding of regression including linear, logistic, and general linear regression, use and interpretation of dichotomous and continuous variables, indicator terms, and interaction terms, and regression diagnostics.

GLHLTH 707
Park, Lawrence GRAD Only SPRING 2015 MSC: Core
PhD: Methods
Global Health Research: Qualitative Field Methods

Course builds on material from GLHLTH702, but narrows focus to (1) qualitative field methods and 2) theories of the mixed method approach. A field-based, applied course designed to help students choose the qualitative field methods that best fit their project. Students will develop basic qualitative skills practiced by social sciences: ethnographic description, participant observation, interviewing. In addition, the course will introduce time allocation diaries and fieldnotes. Will discuss methods for collecting, analyzing, integrating, and reporting data from multiple sources. Finally, we will engage in ethical analysis as a core theme that unifies all stages of research

GLHLTH 772
Stewart, Kearsley GRAD Only SPRING 2015 MSC: Core
PhD: Methods
Global Injury and Injury Prevention

An introduction to the field of injury epidemiology and injury prevention. Prominent types of injury are very different in different settings and those to be discussed in the course are those related to motor vehicles, assaults, firearms, self-injurious behavior and global toxicology. Behavioral, biological, economic and social issues related to the implementation of injury reduction policies will be explored through case studies of specific injury scenarios and interventions. Course will delve into epidemiology, specific research methods and innovative research methods and articles.

GLHLTH 773
Staton, Catherine GRAD Only SPRING 2015 MSC: Elective
Program Evaluation for Health

Covers the principles and tools of evaluation, starting with the evaluation planning process and ending with the dissemination of evaluation results and their use to inform action. Examines different approaches to evaluation (e.g., participatory evaluation), common evaluation designs, and the use of quantitative and qualitative data. Discuss %u201Creal-life%u201D evaluation challenges and explore current debates and developments in the field, utilizing examples of actual evaluations of health-related programs and policies (both domestic and international). For the course project, learners will work with local organizations to help the latter enhance their evaluation capacity.

GLHLTH 774
Silberberg, Mina GRAD Only SPRING 2015 MSC: Methods
MSC: Elective
Global Health Doctoral Certificate Seminar

This seminar is required for the Global Health Doctoral Certificate. Its contents will vary by semester but may include a combination of journal club, discussions with experts at Duke or external visitors, research presentations, and dissertation discussions.

GLHLTH 870S
Sikkema, Kathleen GRAD Only SPRING 2015 PhD: Core
Global Health Capstone

Capstone Course for students in Global Health Certificate and the Global Health Major. Group analysis of a current global health problem/issue. Project involves background research, data acquisition, analysis, writing, and presentation of a substantial research paper/report at an advanced level. Consent of instructor required. Capstone Course for students in Global Health Certificate. Group analysis of a current global health problem/issue. Project involves background research, data acquisition, analysis, writing, and presentation of a substantial research paper/report at an advanced level. Consent of program director required.

Course Notes
Course number was GLHLTH 255S prior to spring 2010. Course is no longer offered as a seminar.
GLHLTH 501
Was: GLHLTH 255
Clements, Dennis UG/GRAD FALL 2015 MAJOR: Senior Seminar
Introductory Demographic Measures and Concepts

This is an introductory course in demographic concepts, measures and techniques. The primary objective is to learn how demographers measure population change, mortality, morbidity, fertility, marriage, divorce, and migration. The course also illustrates the broader application of demographic measurement and techniques to other aspects of society and population health, such as educational attainment, labor force participation, linkages between mortality, morbidity and disability, and health and mortality differentials. The understanding of the materials is aided by a series of problem sets which are designed to help students learn to apply demographic methods.

GLHLTH 530S
Was: GLHLTH 250
Merli, Maria-Giovanna UG/GRAD FALL 2015 MSC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Methods
MAJOR: Focused Study
Cost-Benefit Analysis for Health & Environmental Policy

Course considers the importance of economic analysis, or cost-benefit analysis (CBA), for public policy assessments. Specific focus is on health and environmental policy, and the steps in identification / cataloguing, quantification, and monetization of impacts of potential policies and projects. Covers: Economic rationale for CBA; Basic principles for assessing the economic effects of projects; Techniques for valuing health and environmental impacts; Intergenerational/philosophical concerns related to CBA; Social discounting; Risk and uncertainty; Comparisons of CBA with other approaches (i.e. cost effectiveness analysis, multi-objective analysis).

Course Notes
Formerly titled "Economic Analysis for Environment and Public Health"
GLHLTH 531
Was: GLHLTH 224
Jeuland, Marc UG/GRAD FALL 2015 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Methods
Global Environmental Health: Economics and Policy

Social science perspective on global environmental health. Students will learn to identify primary environmental causes of high burden diseases such as malaria, diarrhea, and respiratory infections; describe how to measure socio-economic impacts of global environmental health diseases; discuss key policies to control global environmental health problems based on private prevention and therapeutic behaviors; and propose frameworks to empirically monitor and evaluate global environmental health policies. A sub-module will focus on climate change and water-borne diseases. Prerequisites: Intro course in statistics.

ENVIRON 538
Was: ENVIRON 238
Pattanayak, Subhrendu UG/GRAD FALL 2015 MSC: Elective
Global Nutrition: Over and Under Nutrition in Developing Countries

Discusses the nutrition problems of developing countries. Reviews epidemiological, biological, and behavioral consequences of both overnutrition (e.g., obesity) and undernutrition (e.g., malnutrition). Emphasizes infectious disease (HIV, TB, malaria, diarrhea) of children and perinatal outcomes (e.g., fetal loss, low birth weight, HIV transmission, pre-eclampsia) of women and children. Strong focus on ethical and political issues relevant to the formulation of nutrition policy and programs in developing countries. Course is designed for graduate students or advanced undergraduates.

GLHLTH 670S
Was: GLHLTH 220S - 01
Staff UG/GRAD FALL 2015 MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Elective
Global Health Challenges

Course introduces major global health problems and social, behavioral, economic, biomedical and environmental determinants of health in resource limited settings. Topics include communicable diseases i.e. HIV, malaria, tuberculosis and common childhood diseases; chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and mental health; and determinants of health associated with these diseases, such as poverty, gender imbalance, culture, poor environmental sanitation, malnutrition, tobacco use, and climate change. Other topics may include health promotion, reproductive health, maternal and child health, and disaster preparedness.

GLHLTH 701
Was: GLHLTH 310
Staff GRAD Only FALL 2015 MSC: Core
PhD: Core
Biostatistics and Epidemiology for Global Health

Course introduces principles of epidemiology, including disease frequency measures; measures of association; observational, experimental, and quasi-experimental study designs; validity -- confounding, selection bias, measurement error; reliability. Course interweaves introductory biostatistics for continuous and categorical variables. Course has a data analysis lab section in which students walk through a guided data analysis on a provided data set, such as Demographic and Health Surveys.

GLHLTH 705
Was: GLHLTH 320
Turner, Elizabeth Park, Lawrence GRAD Only FALL 2015 MSC: Core
PhD: Methods
Genetics for Global Health

Explores the origins of, and current developments in global genomics research. Examples of genomics research and its applications with global health from medicine, agriculture, and environmental sciences. Students will gain familiarity with underlying science, critically analyze ethical, legal and social issues that arise in conduct of genomic research and policies surrounding design and conduct of genomic research, especially in developing countries and with indigenous peoples. Explore how design of genomic research and its commercialization affect access to products and services in the context of global health disparity. Familiarity with basic concepts of genetics and genomics preferred

GLHLTH 510S
Chandrasekharan, Subhashini UG/GRAD FALL 2015 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Elective
Organized Compassion

nAlthough charity was historically a part of everyday life, it was not a central part of organized society. Today, however, from the UN agencies to CARE and countless other NGOs, %u201Cthere exists an international humanitarian order.%u201D This course will introduce students to this institutional organization of compassion, while at the same time exploring the %u201Crevolution of moral sentiments%u201D and theology that brought these institutions into being and sustains them. As Barnett says: %u201CIt is impossible to study humanitarianism without being impressed by the importance of religion [as it has been] critical to the origins of humanitarianism and continue to influence its unfolding.%u201D

GLHLTH 541S
Toole, David UG/GRAD FALL 2015 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MSC: Elective
Non-Communicable Diseases

Course will provide an overview of the recent (mid-20th century to the present) trends in non-communicable disease epidemiology. Focus on four major non-communicable disease categories as separate modules: cardiovascular, oncologic, diabetic and pulmonary diseases. Case studies used to highlight selected geographic differences. By using lectures, assigned readings and classroom discussion the course aims to provide the student with a firm understanding of the shifting disease burden and the landscape of stakeholders and interventions to prevent the same.

GLHLTH 641
Bloomfield, Gerald UG/GRAD FALL 2015 PhD: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Mental Health GLHLTH 660
Was: GLHLTH 223S
Kohrt, Brandon UG/GRAD FALL 2015 MSC: Elective
PhD: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Health Research: Design and Practice

Course provides a foundation in study design, research question development, field implementation, measurement, validity and reliability. Quantitative and qualitative research approaches are examined. Students build critical skills in reading, interpreting and synthesizing scientific literature. The selection of appropriate measurements and survey development is emphasized and issues in field implementation explored.

GLHLTH 702
Was: GLHLTH 321
Green, Eric GRAD Only FALL 2015 MSC: Core
Global Health Capstone

Capstone Course for students in Global Health Certificate and the Global Health Major. Group analysis of a current global health problem/issue. Project involves background research, data acquisition, analysis, writing, and presentation of a substantial research paper/report at an advanced level. Consent of instructor required.

Course Notes
Course number was GLHLTH 255S prior to spring 2010. Course is no longer offered as a seminar.
GLHLTH 501
Was: GLHLTH 255
Boyd, David UG/GRAD SPRING 2014 MAJOR: Senior Seminar
Water, Cooperation, and Conflict
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 533s ENVIRON 543S

Focuses on potential for transboundary water resources-related conflict and cooperation. Discusses water scarcity concepts, natural resource conflict theory, hydro politics, hydro hegemony, water security, water markets and institutions, game theory, and international water law. Other topics include the economics of water and health. Case studies complement the broader course outlook. Focuses on potential for transboundary water resources-related conflict and cooperation. Discusses water scarcity concepts, natural resource conflict theory, hydro politics, hydro hegemony, water security, water markets and institutions, game theory, and international water law. Other topics include the economics of water and health. Case studies complement the broader course outlook.

PUBPOL 580S
Was: PUBPOL 264S
Jeuland, Marc UG/GRAD SPRING 2014 MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Population and Environmental Dynamics and Human Health
Crosslisted as ENVIRON 637

Course examines population, health and environment (PHE) dynamics with focus on interactions in developing or transition economies. Theoretical and empirical approaches governing PHE dynamics from multidisciplinary perspectives, including geography, public health/epidemiology, demography, and economics. Students will obtain experience in design and analysis of PHE studies, and epidemiology of vector-born, chronic and enteric infections. nnCourse examines population, health and environment (PHE) dynamics with focus on interactions in developing or transition economies. Theoretical and empirical approaches governing PHE dynamics from multidisciplinary perspectives, including geography, public health /epidemiology, demography, and economics. Students will obtain experience in design and analysis of PHE studies, and epidemiology of vector-born, chronic and enteric infections.

GLHLTH 637
Was: GLHLTH 237S
Pan, William UG/GRAD SPRING 2014 MSC: Elective
PhD: Elective
MSC: Methods
Global Nutrition: Over and Under Nutrition in Developing Countries

Discusses the nutrition problems of developing countries. Reviews epidemiological, biological, and behavioral consequences of both overnutrition (e.g., obesity) and undernutrition (e.g., malnutrition). Emphasizes infectious disease (HIV, TB, malaria, diarrhea) of children and perinatal outcomes (e.g., fetal loss, low birth weight, HIV transmission, pre-eclampsia) of women and children. Strong focus on ethical and political issues relevant to the formulation of nutrition policy and programs in developing countries. Course is designed for graduate students or advanced undergraduates. nNutrition problems of developing countries. Epidemiological, biological, behavioral consequences of both overnutrition (obesity) and undernutrition (malnutrition). Emphasizes physiology of infectious disease (HIV, TB, malaria, diarrhea) of children and perinatal health outcomes (fetal loss, low birth weight, HIV transmission, pre-eclampsia) of women and children. Basic principles of nutrition, physical manifestation of nutritional deficiency, and anthropometric assessment (body composition). Strong focus on ethical and political issues relevant to formulation of nutrition policy and programs in developing countries. For graduate students or advanced undergraduates. Service learning course.

GLHLTH 670S
Was: GLHLTH 220S - 01
Benjamin Neelon, Sara UG/GRAD SPRING 2014 MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Elective
Health Systems in Developing Countries

This course introduces students to key challenges faced in strengthening of health systems in low and middle income countries. The course will cover a diverse set of topics including an overview of organization of health systems, models of purchasing and providing health care, innovations in financing health care, and issues in service delivery such as quality of care and human resource challenges. Students will learn frameworks and methods employed in the evaluation of health systems. The course will also draw attention to resource allocation problems and various frameworks used to address them. The course will primarily rely on readings from a variety of health policy, economics and other social science journals. Course introduces key challenges faced in strengthening of health systems in low and middle income countries. Topics include: overview of organization of health systems, models of purchasing and providing health care, innovations in financing health care, issues in service delivery such as quality of care and human resource challenges, and frameworks and methods employed in the evaluation of health systems. Course will also draw attention to resource allocation problems and various frameworks used to address them. Readings primarily from health policy, economics and other social science journals. Consent of instructor required.

GLHLTH 750
Was: GLHLTH 340
Schulman, Kevin Pate, Muhammad GRAD Only SPRING 2014 MSC: Core
PhD: Elective
Implementation Research and Health

Implementation Research/Operational Research (IR/OR) studies how to improve uptake, implementation, and translation of research findings into routine and common practices ('know-do' or 'evidence to program' gap); moves results from effectiveness studies and efficacy trials to real-world settings, obtaining information to guide scale-up; helps implementers apply lessons from a program in one context to developing a similar program in a similar environment. Course covers: framework of IR/OR; methods of identifying program implementation problems; how to organize and develop an IR/OR proposal; main study design, research methods, data collection and analysis used in IR/OR; approaches to capacity building for IR/OR in developing countries. IR/OR: studies how to improve uptake, implementation, and translation of research findings into routine and common practices ('know-do' or 'evidence to program' gap); moves results from effectiveness studies and efficacy trials to real-world settings, obtaining information to guide scale-up; helps implementers apply lessons from a program in one context to developing a similar program in a similar environment. Course covers: framework of IR/OR; methods of identifying program implementation problems; how to organize and develop an IR/OR proposal; main study design, research methods, data collection and analysis used in IR/OR; approaches to capacity building for IR/OR in developing countries.

GLHLTH 751
Was: GLHLTH 350
Tang, Shenglan GRAD Only SPRING 2014 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Methods
PhD: Elective
One Health: From Philosophy to Practice

Interdisciplinary course introducing construct of One Health as increasingly important to a holistic understanding of prevention of disease and maintenance of health. Includes discussion of bidirectional impact of animal health on human health, impact of earth’s changing ecology on health. Learning objectives include 1) to describe how different disciplines contribute to the practice of One Health, 2) to creatively design interdisciplinary interventions to improve Global Health using a One Health model. Course will include weekly 2-hour multi-campus seminar off-site at NC Biotechnology Center with on-campus discussion section using case studies to supplement the seminar.
Interdisciplinary course introducing construct of One Health as increasingly important to a holistic understanding of prevention of disease and maintenance of health. Includes discussion of bidirectional impact of animal health on human health, impact of earth¿s changing ecology on health. Learning objectives include 1) to describe how different disciplines contribute to the practice of One Health, 2) to creatively design interdisciplinary interventions to improve Global Health using a One Health model. Course will include weekly 2-hour multi-campus seminar off-site at NC Biotechnology Center with on-campus discussion section using case studies to supplement the seminar.

GLHLTH 771
Was: GLHLTH 371
Pan, William Woods, Chris GRAD Only SPRING 2014 MSC: Elective
PhD: Elective
Ethics For Global Health Research

This course will present an overview of practical and theoretical approaches to bioethics from a range of perspectives, including the humanities, law, philosophy, medicine and science. Students will apply various resources, terminology and frameworks to case studies which will prepare them for their own research. The course will include IRB and responsible conduct of research. (2 credits)

GLHLTH 740
Was: GLHLTH 330
Stewart, Kearsley GRAD Only SPRING 2014 MSC: Core
PhD: Elective
Introduction to Maternal and Child Health

Provides solid foundation in global perspectives on maternal and child health research, practice, and policy. Utilize case analysis to examine critical health challenges facing women, children, providers, and policymakers in some of the world's most vulnerable communities. Course designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students. nProvides solid foundation in global perspectives on maternal and child health research, practice, and policy. Utilize case analysis to examine critical health challenges facing women, children, providers, and policymakers in some of the world¿s most vulnerable communities. Course designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students.

GLHLTH 571
Green, Eric UG/GRAD SPRING 2014 MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Elective
Global Health Research: Quantitative Methods II

Modular course building on Quantitative Methods I. Required module provides common understanding of regression including linear, logistic, and general linear regression, use and interpretation of dichotomous and continuous variables, indicator terms, and interaction terms, and regression diagnostics. nModular course building on Quantitative Methods I. Required module provides common understanding of regression including linear, logistic, and general linear regression, use and interpretation of dichotomous and continuous variables, indicator terms, and interaction terms, and regression diagnostics.

GLHLTH 707
Park, Lawrence GRAD Only SPRING 2014 MSC: Core
PhD: Methods
Global Health Research: Qualitative Field Methods

Course builds on material from GLHLTH702, but narrows focus to (1) qualitative field methods and 2) theories of the mixed method approach. A field-based, applied course designed to help students choose the qualitative field methods that best fit their project. Students will develop basic qualitative skills practiced by social sciences: ethnographic description, participant observation, interviewing. In addition, the course will introduce time allocation diaries and fieldnotes. Will discuss methods for collecting, analyzing, integrating, and reporting data from multiple sources. Finally, we will engage in ethical analysis as a core theme that unifies all stages of research

GLHLTH 772
Stewart, Kearsley GRAD Only SPRING 2014 MSC: Core
PhD: Methods
Comparative Health Care Systems

The interaction of historical, political, economic, cultural, legal/ethical, and sociological factors in the organization and operation of health care systems. Emphasis on how cultural values penetrate the social institutions (politics, economics) that determine health care policies and their reception by societal members. Effects of social and technological change on health care systems, comparing their effects across societies with differing histories, cultural values, and economic systems. Major focus on United States, England, Sweden, and other Western societies.

PUBPOL 590S
Was: PUBPOL 178
Taylor, Donald UG/GRAD SPRING 2014 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Policy
Water Quality Health

Explore basic concepts of water quality and human health with focus on the global water cycle, global water demand and availability, chemical properties of water, contaminants in water, health implications, and environmental isotope hydrology. Highlights relationships between human activities, water scarcity, water quality degradation, and ecological and health consequences. Addresses some policy implications related to conflicts over water resources and impact of energy production on water resources. Prerequisites: prior knowledge of introductory calculus and chemistry or consent of instructor.

EOS 524
Vengosh, Avner UG/GRAD SPRING 2014 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MSC: Elective
Intro to mHealth GLHLTH 590S
Staff UG/GRAD SPRING 2014 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MSC: Elective
PhD: Elective
Air Pollution: From Sources to Health Effects

nBoth urban outdoor air pollution and household indoor air pollution contribute significantly to global burden of disease. Course covers fundamentals about how major air pollutants are generated and transported in the atmosphere and how these pollutants affect human health. Relevant exposure assessment, toxicology and epidemiology case studies are discussed. Prerequisites: general chemistry; introductory-level statistics.

ENVIRON 642
Zhang, Jim UG/GRAD SPRING 2014 MSC: Elective
Global Mental Health
Crosslisted as CULANTH 611S PSY 611
GLHLTH 660
Was: GLHLTH 223S
Kohrt, Brandon UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
PhD: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Health Challenges

Course introduces major global health problems and social, behavioral, economic, biomedical and environmental determinants of health in resource limited settings. Topics include communicable diseases i.e. HIV, malaria, tuberculosis and common childhood diseases; chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and mental health; and determinants of health associated with these diseases, such as poverty, gender imbalance, culture, poor environmental sanitation, malnutrition, tobacco use, and climate change. Other topics may include health promotion, reproductive health, maternal and child health, and disaster preparedness.

GLHLTH 701
Was: GLHLTH 310
Woods, Chris GRAD Only FALL 2014 MSC: Core
PhD: Core
Global Health Research: Design and Practice

Course provides a foundation in study design, research question development, field implementation, measurement, validity and reliability. Quantitative and qualitative research approaches are examined. Students build critical skills in reading, interpreting and synthesizing scientific literature. The selection of appropriate measurements and survey development is emphasized and issues in field implementation explored.

GLHLTH 702
Was: GLHLTH 321
Sullivan, Kristen GRAD Only FALL 2014 MSC: Core
Biostatistics and Epidemiology for Global Health

Course introduces principles of epidemiology, including disease frequency measures; measures of association; observational, experimental, and quasi-experimental study designs; validity -- confounding, selection bias, measurement error; reliability. Course interweaves introductory biostatistics for continuous and categorical variables. Course has a data analysis lab section in which students walk through a guided data analysis on a provided data set, such as Demographic and Health Surveys.

GLHLTH 705
Was: GLHLTH 320
Turner, Elizabeth Park, Lawrence GRAD Only FALL 2014 MSC: Core
PhD: Methods
Introduction to Maternal and Child Health

Provides solid foundation in global perspectives on maternal and child health research, practice, and policy. Utilize case analysis to examine critical health challenges facing women, children, providers, and policymakers in some of the world's most vulnerable communities. Course designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students.

GLHLTH 571
Green, Eric UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Elective
Non-Communicable Diseases

Course will provide an overview of the recent (mid-20th century to the present) trends in non-communicable disease epidemiology. Focus on four major non-communicable disease categories as separate modules: cardiovascular, oncologic, diabetic and pulmonary diseases. Case studies used to highlight selected geographic differences. By using lectures, assigned readings and classroom discussion the course aims to provide the student with a firm understanding of the shifting disease burden and the landscape of stakeholders and interventions to prevent the same.

GLHLTH 641
Bloomfield, Gerald UG/GRAD FALL 2014 PhD: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Environmental Health: Economics and Policy
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 538

Social science perspective on global environmental health. Students will learn to identify primary environmental causes of high burden diseases such as malaria, diarrhea, and respiratory infections; describe how to measure socio-economic impacts of global environmental health diseases; discuss key policies to control global environmental health problems based on private prevention and therapeutic behaviors; and propose frameworks to empirically monitor and evaluate global environmental health policies. A sub-module will focus on climate change and water-borne diseases. Prerequisites: Intro course in statistics.

ENVIRON 538
Was: ENVIRON 238
Jeuland, Marc UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
African Health Systems, NGOs, and GH

Explores complex institutional environment of African health systems, emphasizing NGOs. Weaves together: (1) social, political, economic context of Africa; (2) origins/current condition of African health systems; (3) evolution of NGOs in these systems, and in global health and international development; (4) transitions in global health governance from WHO in the 1940s to complex actors of today; (5) role of primary health care in global health, from 1978 Alma Ata Declaration to primary healthcare packages in country plans. Topics pursued in historical and contemporary terms through team projects, case studies focused on health systems and institutional actors in representative countries.

GLHLTH 671
Toole, David UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Elective
Cost-Benefit Analysis for Health & Environmental Policy
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 607 ENVIRON 563

Course considers the importance of economic analysis, or cost-benefit analysis (CBA), for public policy assessments. Specific focus is on health and environmental policy, and the steps in identification / cataloguing, quantification, and monetization of impacts of potential policies and projects. Covers: Economic rationale for CBA; Basic principles for assessing the economic effects of projects; Techniques for valuing health and environmental impacts; Intergenerational/philosophical concerns related to CBA; Social discounting; Risk and uncertainty; Comparisons of CBA with other approaches (i.e. cost effectiveness analysis, multi-objective analysis).

Course Notes
Formerly titled "Economic Analysis for Environment and Public Health"
GLHLTH 531
Was: GLHLTH 224
Jeuland, Marc UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Methods
Genomic Perspectives on Human Evolution

Human evolutionary history as studied from the perspective of the genome. Nature of contemporary genomic data and how they are interpreted in the context of the fossil record, comparative anatomy, psychology, and cultural studies. Examination of both the origin of modern humans as a distinct species and subsequent migration across the world. Emphasis on language, behavior, and disease susceptibility as traits of particular evolutionary interest. Prerequisite: Biology 118 or equivalent course. Instructor: Wray

BIOLOGY 554
Was: BIOLOGY 274-01
Wray, Gregory UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
Environmental Toxicology

Study of environmental contaminants from a broad perspective encompassing biochemical, ecological, and toxicological principles and methodologies. Discussion of sources, environmental transport and transformation phenomena, accumulation in biota and ecosystems. Impacts at various levels of organization, particularly biochemical and physiological effects. Prerequisites: organic chemistry and vertebrate physiology or consent of instructor. Instructor: Di Giulio. 3 units.

ENVIRON 501
Was: ENVIRON 212
Meyer, Joel UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
Air Quality Management

Types, sources, effects of air pollutants. Regulatory framework emphasizing the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and federal, state, local agency implementation. Application of risk assessment, technology, market incentives to air management. Scientific, policy aspects of acid deposition, global climate change, indoor air, mobile sources control. Dispersion modeling, exposure assessment. Instructor: Vandenberg. 3 units.

ENVIRON 535
Was: ENVIRON 235
Vandenberg, John UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
Special Topics- Seminar Healthcare in Developing Countries

In this age of globalization, the expectations of life-saving technologies cross borders readily, but the introduction and adaptation of these technologies in resource-limited settings often lag behind. While we often think of technologies such as AIDS drugs, there are many appropriate technologies that are potentially transformative for improving local health – making water potable, cookstoves more efficient and less polluting, and diagnostics more available in local clinics. Behind each of these technologies, there are innovators, sometimes publicly funded researchers, other times private companies, often social entrepreneurs.
In this course, students will critically examine the policy and philanthropic landscape behind these areas of appropriate technology. Beyond the engineering of these technologies, what is the social engineering of policies that minimize inequity? For example, is potable water best tackled with an innovation that serves the needs of an individual (e.g., Life Straw), a group (e.g., solar disinfectant system), or an entire community (e.g., chlorination of a local reservoir). Through the lens of these technologies, students will consider what factors help enable local innovation, from intellectual and financial capital to end-user input and systems for sharing and owning knowledge. What forms of philanthropy – from microcredit and giving circles to donor aid – work best to foster local innovation and to build local capacity? What are the ethical issues involved in introducing technologies, from double standards in quality to donor-recipient relationships? This course seeks to prepare those engaged in such work to consider the policy ramifications of designing innovation for global health.

PUBPOL 590S
Was: PUBPOL 264S.32
Martin-Staple, Anne UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
Politics of International Aid in Low-Income Countries

The effectiveness of aid in low-income countries has been the subject of intense debate.The course will examine the context and objectives of international aid, the record and lessons, and recent efforts and proposals for change within the international community. There is a special (but not exclusive) focus on Africa, since more robust growth and poverty reduction on that continent are at the center of the aidneffectiveness debate. In this exploration of the politics of aid, attention will be focused on the principal stakeholders, their motivations, and the quality of interaction among the various players (Governments, NGOs, bilateral donors, and multilateral institutions), along with the bottom line whether aid is resulting in poverty reduction in low income countries. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with recent literature on the topic, key debates surrounding aid effectiveness, the policies and actions of different donors, and recent proposals and measures aimed at improving development assistance. The course is primarily a group discussion, with occasional mini-lectures, student presentations, debates, case studies, two papers, and a final simulation.

PUBPOL 724
Was: PUBPOL 383E.01
Pomerantz, Phyllis GRAD Only FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
Globalization and Governance

Seminar explores economic, political, and social aspects of globalization and their implications for public policy making in the twenty-first century. Focus on issues of governance, particularly international cooperation, the design of international organizations, and the role of international NGOs. Policy areas include international trade and finance, environment, security, human rights, media and communications, and international development.

PUBPOL 820
Was: PUBPOL 320
Jentleson, Bruce GRAD Only FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Provides the student the opportunity to incorporate health promotion and disease prevention assessment and intervention into the health of clients across the life span. Applying the principles of health education, the course prepares students to use the tools and skills necessary to provide health promotion and disease
prevention services to individuals, families, groups, and communities. The definition of health and the factors that impact an individual's or group's health framework is the basis for understanding health maintenance interventions. 3 credits.

NURSING 502
Was: NURSING 502
Staff UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
Global Health Doctoral Certificate Seminar

This seminar is required for the Global Health Doctoral Certificate. Its contents will vary by semester but may include a combination of journal club, discussions with experts at Duke or external visitors, research presentations, and dissertation discussions.

GLHLTH 870S
Sikkema, Kathleen GRAD Only FALL 2014 PhD: Core
Global Health and Genomics

Explores the origins of, and current developments in global genomics research. Examples of genomics research and its applications with global health from medicine, agriculture, and environmental sciences. Students will gain familiarity with underlying science, critically analyze ethical, legal and social issues that arise in conduct of genomic research and policies surrounding design and conduct of genomic research, especially in developing countries and with indigenous peoples. Explore how design of genomic research and its commercialization affect access to products and services in the context of global health disparity. Familiarity with basic concepts of genetics and genomics preferred.

GENOME 508S
Chandrasekharan, Subhashini UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MSC: Elective
PhD: Elective
Economic Growth and Development Policy

Basic principles and policy issues in the study of economic growth and development. The roles of physical, natural and human capital, technological innovation, productivity improvements and institutions in explaining patterns andncauses of variations in growth and development performance of countries. Effects on growth and development of many current policy issues including HIV-AIDs, financial crises, foreign aid and investment, debt burdens and forgiveness, corruption and governance. Prerequisite: Public Policy Studies 302.

PUBPOL 598
Fernholz, Fernando UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
Global Health Supply and Organization

The course will begin with an overview of the methods of cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-benefit analysis with specific examples to illustrate how these methodologies have been used to assess specific technologies as well as barriers to their use, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. We then will focus on particular sectors%u2014starting with pharmaceuticals and vaccines followed by inpatient hospital care and ambulatory (outpatient) care. We will then devote an entire section of the course to quality of care, focusing on how it can and has been measured. After students have gained some familiarity with the parts of the health system, we will examine the attractiveness of various models of financing and provision, ranging from private sector financing and provision, mixed private sector and public financing and provision, and a fully public program of financing and provision.

ECON 690-01
Sloan, Frank UG/GRAD FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
GHC: Methods
Environmental Exposure Analysis

People are exposed to chemical contaminants on a daily basis, and sometimes these exposures can lead to an increased risk of developing health problems. To fully evaluate risks from these exposures, it is critical that chemical exposure levels are adequately measured and evaluated. This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of environmental exposures, and explore different routes by which people are exposed to contaminants through our daily lives and behavior. Introductions to various experimental techniques used to measure exposure will be reviewed and discussed. Statistical approaches used to evaluate variables contributing to exposure will also be explored. After completion of this course, students should have a thorough understanding of how to develop an effective exposure assessment experiment, and how to use various mathematical models to quantify this exposure.

GLHLTH 780
Zhang, Jim Stapleton, Heather GRAD Only FALL 2014 MSC: Elective
PhD: Methods
PhD: Elective
Introductory Demographic Measures and Concepts
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 532S

This is an introductory course in demographic concepts, measures and techniques. The primary objective is to learn how demographers measure population change, mortality, morbidity, fertility, marriage, divorce, and migration. The course also illustrates the broader application of demographic measurement and techniques to other aspects of society and population health, such as educational attainment, labor force participation, linkages between mortality, morbidity and disability, and health and mortality differentials. The understanding of the materials is aided by a series of problem sets which are designed to help students learn to apply demographic methods.

GLHLTH 530S
Was: GLHLTH 250
Merli, Maria-Giovanna UG/GRAD FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Methods
MAJOR: Focused Study
Global Mental Health
Crosslisted as PSY 611
GLHLTH 660
Was: GLHLTH 223S
Staff UG/GRAD FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
PhD: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Health Challenges

Course introduces major global health problems and social, behavioral, economic, biomedical and environmental determinants of health in resource limited settings. Topics include communicable diseases i.e. HIV, malaria, tuberculosis and common childhood diseases; chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and mental health; and determinants of health associated with these diseases, such as poverty, gender imbalance, culture, poor environmental sanitation, malnutrition, tobacco use, and climate change. Other topics may include health promotion, reproductive health, maternal and child health, and disaster preparedness.

GLHLTH 701
Was: GLHLTH 310
Woods, Chris GRAD Only FALL 2013 MSC: Core
PhD: Core
Global Health Research: Design and Practice

Course provides a foundation in study design, research question development, field implementation, measurement, validity and reliability. Quantitative and qualitative research approaches are examined. Students build critical skills in reading, interpreting and synthesizing scientific literature. The selection of appropriate measurements and survey development is emphasized and issues in field implementation explored.

GLHLTH 702
Was: GLHLTH 321
Sullivan, Kristen GRAD Only FALL 2013 MSC: Core
Biostatistics and Epidemiology for Global Health

Course introduces principles of epidemiology, including disease frequency measures; measures of association; observational, experimental, and quasi-experimental study designs; validity -- confounding, selection bias, measurement error; reliability. Course interweaves introductory biostatistics for continuous and categorical variables. Course has a data analysis lab section in which students walk through a guided data analysis on a provided data set, such as Demographic and Health Surveys.

GLHLTH 705
Was: GLHLTH 320
Turner, Elizabeth GRAD Only FALL 2013 MSC: Core
PhD: Methods
Ungraded Research in Global Health

Individual research in a field of special interest, the central goal of which is a substantive paper containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Consent required.

GLHLTH 781
Was: GLHLTH 381
Woods, Chris GRAD Only FALL 2013 MSC: Thesis
Genomic Perspectives on Human Evolution
Crosslisted as BIOLOGY 554

Human evolutionary history as studied from the perspective of the genome. Nature of contemporary genomic data and how they are interpreted in the context of the fossil record, comparative anatomy, psychology, and cultural studies. Examination of both the origin of modern humans as a distinct species and subsequent migration across the world. Emphasis on language, behavior, and disease susceptibility as traits of particular evolutionary interest. Prerequisite: Biology 118 or equivalent course. Instructor: Wray

BIOLOGY 554
Was: BIOLOGY 274-01
Wray, Gregory UG/GRAD FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
Environmental Toxicology

Study of environmental contaminants from a broad perspective encompassing biochemical, ecological, and toxicological principles and methodologies. Discussion of sources, environmental transport and transformation phenomena, accumulation in biota and ecosystems. Impacts at various levels of organization, particularly biochemical and physiological effects. Prerequisites: organic chemistry and vertebrate physiology or consent of instructor. Instructor: Di Giulio. 3 units.

ENVIRON 501
Was: ENVIRON 212
Meyer, Joel UG/GRAD FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
Air Quality Management

Types, sources, effects of air pollutants. Regulatory framework emphasizing the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and federal, state, local agency implementation. Application of risk assessment, technology, market incentives to air management. Scientific, policy aspects of acid deposition, global climate change, indoor air, mobile sources control. Dispersion modeling, exposure assessment. Instructor: Vandenberg. 3 units.

ENVIRON 535
Was: ENVIRON 235
Vandenburg, John UG/GRAD FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
Global Environmental Health: Economics and Policy
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 582 GLHLTH 538

Social science perspective on global environmental health. Students will learn to identify primary environmental causes of high burden diseases such as malaria, diarrhea, and respiratory infections; describe how to measure socio-economic impacts of global environmental health diseases; discuss key policies to control global environmental health problems based on private prevention and therapeutic behaviors; and propose frameworks to empirically monitor and evaluate global environmental health policies. A sub-module will focus on climate change and water-borne diseases. Prerequisites: Intro course in statistics.

ENVIRON 538
Was: ENVIRON 238
Pattanayak, Subhrendu UG/GRAD FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Provides the student the opportunity to incorporate health promotion and disease prevention assessment and intervention into the health of clients across the life span. Applying the principles of health education, the course prepares students to use the tools and skills necessary to provide health promotion and disease
prevention services to individuals, families, groups, and communities. The definition of health and the factors that impact an individual's or group's health framework is the basis for understanding health maintenance interventions. 3 credits.

NURSING 502
Was: NURSING 502
Utley-Smith, Queen UG/GRAD FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
Special Topics Statistics For Policy Makers

The purpose of this course is to ensure that students are both critical consumers and effective producers of statistical evidence presented in support of policy arguments. Upon completing this course, students will have the capacity to analyze and evaluate arguments based on simple descriptive statistics, correlation, or multiple regression analysis. Students will also receive hand-on training in the creation of convincing statistical reports, from manipulating large datasets to conduction sensitivity analysis and presenting results.

PUBPOL 812
Was: PUBPOL 312
Pizer, William GRAD Only FALL 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Politics of International Aid in Low-Income Countries

The effectiveness of aid in low-income countries has been the subject of intense debate.The course will examine the context and objectives of international aid, the record and lessons, and recent efforts and proposals for change within the international community. There is a special (but not exclusive) focus on Africa, since more robust growth and poverty reduction on that continent are at the center of the aidneffectiveness debate. In this exploration of the politics of aid, attention will be focused on the principal stakeholders, their motivations, and the quality of interaction among the various players (Governments, NGOs, bilateral donors, and multilateral institutions), along with the bottom line whether aid is resulting in poverty reduction in low income countries. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with recent literature on the topic, key debates surrounding aid effectiveness, the policies and actions of different donors, and recent proposals and measures aimed at improving development assistance. The course is primarily a group discussion, with occasional mini-lectures, student presentations, debates, case studies, two papers, and a final simulation.

PUBPOL 724
Was: PUBPOL 383E.01
Pomerantz, Phyllis GRAD Only FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
Proseminar in Social Psychology

Selected topics in microsociology and social psychology, including social interaction, decision making, social exchange, group processes, intergroup relations, self and identity, social structure and personality, social networks, and application in organizations and health care. Introduction to social psychology; rational choice and social exchange; sociology of self and identity; group processes and intergroup relations; experimental research; practicum; social psychology. Instructor: Smith-
Lovin. 3 units.

SOCIOL 770S
Was: SOCIOL 229S
Smith-Lovin, Lynn GRAD Only FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
Economic Growth and Development Policy

Basic principles and policy issues in the study of economic growth and development. The roles of physical, natural and human capital, technological innovation, productivity improvements and institutions in explaining patterns andncauses of variations in growth and development performance of countries. Effects on growth and development of many current policy issues including HIV-AIDs, financial crises, foreign aid and investment, debt burdens and forgiveness, corruption and governance. Prerequisite: Public Policy Studies 302.

PUBPOL 598
Fernholz, Fernando UG/GRAD FALL 2013 MSC: Elective
Health Systems in Developing Countries

This course introduces students to key challenges faced in strengthening of health systems in low and middle income countries. The course will cover a diverse set of topics including an overview of organization of health systems, models of purchasing and providing health care, innovations in financing health care, and issues in service delivery such as quality of care and human resource challenges. Students will learn frameworks and methods employed in the evaluation of health systems. The course will also draw attention to resource allocation problems and various frameworks used to address them. The course will primarily rely on readings from a variety of health policy, economics and other social science journals.

GLHLTH 750
Was: GLHLTH 340
Mohanan, Manoj GRAD Only SPRING 2013 MSC: Core
PhD: Elective
Global Health Capstone

Capstone Course for students in Global Health Certificate and the Global Health Major. Group analysis of a current global health problem/issue. Project involves background research, data acquisition, analysis, writing, and presentation of a substantial research paper/report at an advanced level. Consent of instructor required.

Course Notes
Course number was GLHLTH 255S prior to spring 2010. Course is no longer offered as a seminar.
GLHLTH 501
Was: GLHLTH 255
Boyd, David UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 MAJOR: Senior Seminar
Global Mental Health
Crosslisted as CULANTH 611S PSY 611
GLHLTH 660
Was: GLHLTH 223S
Puffer, Eve UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
PhD: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Population and Environmental Dynamics and Human Health
Crosslisted as ENVIRON 637

Course examines population, health and environment (PHE) dynamics with focus on interactions in developing or transition economies. Theoretical and empirical approaches governing PHE dynamics from multidisciplinary perspectives, including geography, public health/epidemiology, demography, and economics. Students will obtain experience in design and analysis of PHE studies, and epidemiology of vector-born, chronic and enteric infections.

GLHLTH 637
Was: GLHLTH 237S
Pan, William UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
PhD: Elective
MSC: Methods
Ethics For Global Health Research

This course will present an overview of practical and theoretical approaches to bioethics from a range of perspectives, including the humanities, law, philosophy, medicine and science. Students will apply various resources, terminology and frameworks to case studies which will prepare them for their own research. The course will include IRB and responsible conduct of research. (2 credits)

GLHLTH 740
Was: GLHLTH 330
Stewart, Kearsley GRAD Only SPRING 2013 MSC: Core
PhD: Elective
Implementation Research and Health

Implementation Research/Operational Research (IR/OR) studies how to improve uptake, implementation, and translation of research findings into routine and common practices ('know-do' or 'evidence to program' gap); moves results from effectiveness studies and efficacy trials to real-world settings, obtaining information to guide scale-up; helps implementers apply lessons from a program in one context to developing a similar program in a similar environment. Course covers: framework of IR/OR; methods of identifying program implementation problems; how to organize and develop an IR/OR proposal; main study design, research methods, data collection and analysis used in IR/OR; approaches to capacity building for IR/OR in developing countries.

GLHLTH 751
Was: GLHLTH 350
Tang, Shenglan GRAD Only SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Methods
PhD: Elective
One Health: From Philosophy to Practice

Interdisciplinary course introducing construct of One Health as increasingly important to a holistic understanding of prevention of disease and maintenance of health. Includes discussion of bidirectional impact of animal health on human health, impact of earth’s changing ecology on health. Learning objectives include 1) to describe how different disciplines contribute to the practice of One Health, 2) to creatively design interdisciplinary interventions to improve Global Health using a One Health model. Course will include weekly 2-hour multi-campus seminar off-site at NC Biotechnology Center with on-campus discussion section using case studies to supplement the seminar.

GLHLTH 771
Was: GLHLTH 371
Pan, William Woods, Chris GRAD Only SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
PhD: Elective
Microbial Ecology and Evolution

Survey of new advances in the field of environmental and evolutionary microbiology, based on current literature, discussion, and laboratory exercises. Topics to include bacterial phylogeny, molecular ecology, emerging infectious diseases, bacterial symbiosis, experimental evolution, evolution of drug resistance, and microbial genomics. Prerequisite: Biology 25L, 103L, 118, or consent of instructor. Instructor: Vilgalys. 4 units.

BIOLOGY 557L
Was: BIOLOGY 211L
Rytas, Vilgalys UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment

Topics central to both health and ecological risk assessment are explored. Basic concepts of hazard identification, dose response relationships, exposure assessment, and risk characterization and
communication are discussed in the context of both human health and environmental assessment. The basis and rationale for using specific, as well as extrapolated, scientific information and expert judgment, and the strengths and weaknesses of alternative approaches, are evaluated. Applications emphasizing real cases are used to illustrate the interdisciplinary process and products of risk assessment, as well as the regulatory use of the information. Group projects emphasized. Instructors: Mihaich and McMasters. 3 units

Course Notes
Counts as Methods for students matriculating in or before fall 2009.
ENVIRON 539
Was: ENVIRON 239
Mihaich, Ellen UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 GHC: Methods
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
Resource Environmental Policy/environmental Politics
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 577

Environmental policy
formation and implementation in comparative perspective. Topics include interest groups, environmental movements
and parties, public opinion, political systems and institutions. Case students selected from the United States and other advanced industrialized countries and the developing world. Spring.

ENVIRON 577
Was: ENVIRON 274
Albright, Elizabeth UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Virology and Viral Oncology MGM 552
Was: MGM 252
Cullen, Brian UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Human Genetics

Topics include segregation, genetic linkage, population genetics, multifactorial inheritance, biochemical genetics, cytogenetics, somatic cell genetics, neurogenetics, cancer genetics, clinical genetics, positional cloning, complex disease. Lectures plus weekly discussion of assigned papers from the research literature. Prerequisites: University Program in Genetics 278 or equivalent, and graduate status or consent of instructor. Instructors: Marchuk, Pericak-Vance, and Speer. 3 units. C-L: University Program in Genetics 232

MGM 532
Was: MGM 232
Marchuk, Douglas UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
Microbial Pathogenesis

Modern molecular genetic approaches to understanding the pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Underlying mechanisms of pathogenesis and host-parasite relationships that contribute to the infectious disease process.

MGM 582
Was: MGM 282
Baldivia, Raphael UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Provides the student the opportunity to incorporate health promotion and disease prevention assessment and intervention into the health of clients across the life span. Applying the principles of health education, the course prepares students to use the tools and skills necessary to provide health promotion and disease
prevention services to individuals, families, groups, and communities. The definition of health and the factors that impact an individual's or group's health framework is the basis for understanding health maintenance interventions. 3 credits.

NURSING 502
Was: NURSING 502
Staff UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
Responsible Genomics

Survey of ethical, social, economic, and legal issues in genomics. Introduction to ethical reasoning and examination of selected issues calling for such analysis, including: special procedures for research involving human participants, (2) respect for privacy and confidentiality of genetic information; (3) historical and political background of health research funding, and (4) public-private research interactions such as intellectual property and conflict of interest. Instructor: Cook-Deegan. 3 units. (Also counts as a policy elective.)

PUBPOL 634
Was: PUBPOL 240
Chandrasekharan, Subhashini UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
Designing Innovation for Global Health

In this age of globalization, the expectations of life-saving technologies cross borders readily, but the introduction and adaptation of these technologies in resource-limited settings often lag behind. While we often think of technologies such as AIDS drugs, there are many appropriate technologies that are potentially transformative for improving local health--making water potable, cookstoves more efficient and less polluting, and diagnostics more available in local clinics. Behind each of these technologies, there are innovators, sometimes publicly funded researchers, other times private companies, often social entrepreneurs. In this course, students will critically examine the policy and philanthropic landscape behind these areas of appropriate technology. Beyond the engineering of these technologies, what is the social engineering of policies that minimize inequity? For example, is potable water best tackled with an innovation that serves the needs of an individual (e.g., Life Straw), a group (e.g., solar disinfectant system), or an entire community (e.g., chlorination of a local reservoir). Through the lens of these technologies, students will consider what factors help enable local innovation, from intellectual and financial capital to end-user input and systems for sharing and owning knowledge. What forms of philanthropy—from microcredit and giving circles to donor aid—work best to foster local innovation and to build local capacity? What are the ethical issues involved in introducing technologies, from double standards in quality to donor-recipient relationships? This course seeks to prepare those engaged in such work to consider the policy ramifications of designing innovation for global health.

PUBPOL 642S
Was: PUBPOL 213
So, Anthony UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Politics of International Aid in Low-Income Countries

The effectiveness of aid in low-income countries has been the subject of intense debate.The course will examine the context and objectives of international aid, the record and lessons, and recent efforts and proposals for change within the international community. There is a special (but not exclusive) focus on Africa, since more robust growth and poverty reduction on that continent are at the center of the aidneffectiveness debate. In this exploration of the politics of aid, attention will be focused on the principal stakeholders, their motivations, and the quality of interaction among the various players (Governments, NGOs, bilateral donors, and multilateral institutions), along with the bottom line whether aid is resulting in poverty reduction in low income countries. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with recent literature on the topic, key debates surrounding aid effectiveness, the policies and actions of different donors, and recent proposals and measures aimed at improving development assistance. The course is primarily a group discussion, with occasional mini-lectures, student presentations, debates, case studies, two papers, and a final simulation.

PUBPOL 724
Was: PUBPOL 383E.01
Pomerantz, Phyllis GRAD Only SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
Innovation and Policy Entrepreneurship

This course will analyze a sampling of innovative policies and programs that were initiated to solve major problems in developed and developing countries. Some of the approaches worked; some did not. All of them, however, challenged conventional thinking, hence the title of the course ‘innovative policies’. During the semester we will discuss the following issues: crisis, innovation and policy space, leadership, transformation and transitions, innovation from within and from without, sectoral opportunity, unintended consequences, and the dynamics of decision making for innovative policies. Among the examples we will discuss are the Marshall Plan in Europe, the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, Thailand’s approach to Family Planning, and the start of major civic volunteerism in the United States. The course will use the case approach. Each week, we will discuss a policy or set of policies. Students enrolled in the course will be asked to join a group (2-3) to discuss, analyze and present the cases. They are expected to develop a case and present it. We will also have films that highlight some aspect of a case.

PUBPOL 726
Was: PUBPOL 383G.01
Fernholz, Fernando GRAD Only SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
Non-Communicable Diseases

Course will provide an overview of the recent (mid-20th century to the present) trends in non-communicable disease epidemiology. Focus on four major non-communicable disease categories as separate modules: cardiovascular, oncologic, diabetic and pulmonary diseases. Case studies used to highlight selected geographic differences. By using lectures, assigned readings and classroom discussion the course aims to provide the student with a firm understanding of the shifting disease burden and the landscape of stakeholders and interventions to prevent the same.

GLHLTH 641
Bloomfield, Gerald UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 PhD: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
African Health Systems, NGOs, and GH

Explores complex institutional environment of African health systems, emphasizing NGOs. Weaves together: (1) social, political, economic context of Africa; (2) origins/current condition of African health systems; (3) evolution of NGOs in these systems, and in global health and international development; (4) transitions in global health governance from WHO in the 1940s to complex actors of today; (5) role of primary health care in global health, from 1978 Alma Ata Declaration to primary healthcare packages in country plans. Topics pursued in historical and contemporary terms through team projects, case studies focused on health systems and institutional actors in representative countries.

GLHLTH 671
Toole, David UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Elective
Spatial Epidemiology and Demography
Crosslisted as ENVIRON 636

Use of analytical tools to understand spatial patterns in health and demographic events. Students acquire skills in spatial data analysis and interpreting spatial patterns. Students will understand fundamental concepts in spatial epidemiology and demography, including spatial autocorrelation, heterogeneity and bias, spatial interaction, and small area estimation; identify spatial and space-time clusters of events and judiciously evaluate hypothesis tests; and develop spatial regression models that appropriately account for spatial heterogeneity or explicitly model spatial autocorrelation. Success in this course requires prior knowledge of Geographic Information System and Statistics.

GLHLTH 636
Pan, William UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Special Topics: Law, Development, & Human Rights
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 590S

This course is focused on challenges for poor people in which one of the questions is how large a role law should play in addressing the development challenge, and another question is whether or not to foreground legalized human rights as part of a strategy for pro-poor development. In the first (framing) part of the course we will explore arguments for nudging rather than fully mandating choices, considering how insights from popular behavioral economics might bear on policies to promote development with a minimum of legal rules. We will also learn about power analyses of development and such practitioner tools as power mapping, citizen report cards and public expenditure tracking surveys and consider the implications of these approaches to development for when and how law might best promote development. In the second (case module) part of the course we will take up three to four real world cases in which legal arguments, development problems, and ethical and human rights claims are all in play and policy decisions must be made, in that case, about what mix might be best for pro-poor development. Built into the case will be perspectives taken by different countries or communities, different stake-holders with different ideologies, and different disciplinary specialists. In each case module, we will ask if law, including legalized human rights, can be viewed both as part of the problem and as part of various prospective solutions. Also what other forms of nudging might help us innovate in relation to those problems. For each case module we will attend to ethical questions sometimes coded as grounded in human rights and sometimes not that arise in pursuit of pro-poor development. Case modules involve a range of development challenges, eg, safeguarding public health in the shadow of bilateral investment treaties or corporate constitutional rights; curbing corruption and empowering citizens and civil society to progressively achieve government accountability in such areas as health and education; enabling access to essential medicines for patients who cannot pay; promoting positive corporate conduct through devices like benefit corporations (b-corps) and restraining corporate complicity in human rights violations; maintaining social and environmental safeguards for World Bank- sponsored development initiatives. Students will have the opportunity to select and frame one of the cases. No expertise in law is required. We will learn as needed the rudiments of the relevant law for each case module, whether local, constitutional, national, international, or law-like institutional review processes like the World Bank's Inspection Panel that enables challenges to World Bank decisions. The strategic policy insights we seek will be of consequence for professional practitioners (eg. health workers, development workers) and government entities, as well as non-governmental organizations, citizen-based organizations and communities, corporations, transnational networks, and ordinary people.

PUBPOL 590S
Admay, Catherine UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
GHC: Ethics
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Special Topics: Food Policy
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 590S

Food markets (supply and demand of food, domestic and international markets for food), food policy (policies geared toward consumers, policies geared toward producers), food politics (the political economy of food, food and conflict, famines), the future of food (biotechnology, futures and options, etc.), as well as contemporary controversies (e.g., local food, organic vs. industrial food, etc.)n

PUBPOL 590S
Bellamare, Marc UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Introduction to Maternal and Child Health

Provides solid foundation in global perspectives on maternal and child health research, practice, and policy. Utilize case analysis to examine critical health challenges facing women, children, providers, and policymakers in some of the world's most vulnerable communities. Course designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students.

GLHLTH 571
Green, Eric UG/GRAD SPRING 2013 MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Elective
Global Health and Genomics
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 510S

Explores the origins of, and current developments in global genomics research. Examples of genomics research and its applications with global health from medicine, agriculture, and environmental sciences. Students will gain familiarity with underlying science, critically analyze ethical, legal and social issues that arise in conduct of genomic research and policies surrounding design and conduct of genomic research, especially in developing countries and with indigenous peoples. Explore how design of genomic research and its commercialization affect access to products and services in the context of global health disparity. Familiarity with basic concepts of genetics and genomics preferred.

GENOME 508S
Chandrasekharan, Subhashini UG/GRAD FALL 2013 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MSC: Elective
PhD: Elective
Global Health Challenges

Course introduces major global health problems and social, behavioral, economic, biomedical and environmental determinants of health in resource limited settings. Topics include communicable diseases i.e. HIV, malaria, tuberculosis and common childhood diseases; chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and mental health; and determinants of health associated with these diseases, such as poverty, gender imbalance, culture, poor environmental sanitation, malnutrition, tobacco use, and climate change. Other topics may include health promotion, reproductive health, maternal and child health, and disaster preparedness.

GLHLTH 701
Was: GLHLTH 310
Woods, Chris GRAD Only FALL 2012 MSC: Core
PhD: Core
Genomic Perspectives on Human Evolution

Human evolutionary history as studied from the perspective of the genome. Nature of contemporary genomic data and how they are interpreted in the context of the fossil record, comparative anatomy, psychology, and cultural studies. Examination of both the origin of modern humans as a distinct species and subsequent migration across the world. Emphasis on language, behavior, and disease susceptibility as traits of particular evolutionary interest. Prerequisite: Biology 118 or equivalent course. Instructor: Wray

BIOLOGY 554
Was: BIOLOGY 274-01
Wray, Gregory UG/GRAD FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
Environmental Toxicology

Study of environmental contaminants from a broad perspective encompassing biochemical, ecological, and toxicological principles and methodologies. Discussion of sources, environmental transport and transformation phenomena, accumulation in biota and ecosystems. Impacts at various levels of organization, particularly biochemical and physiological effects. Prerequisites: organic chemistry and vertebrate physiology or consent of instructor. Instructor: Di Giulio. 3 units.

ENVIRON 501
Was: ENVIRON 212
Meyer, Joel UG/GRAD FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
Air Quality Management

Types, sources, effects of air pollutants. Regulatory framework emphasizing the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and federal, state, local agency implementation. Application of risk assessment, technology, market incentives to air management. Scientific, policy aspects of acid deposition, global climate change, indoor air, mobile sources control. Dispersion modeling, exposure assessment. Instructor: Vandenberg. 3 units.

ENVIRON 535
Was: ENVIRON 235
Vandenberg, John UG/GRAD FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
Global Environmental Health: Economics and Policy
Crosslisted as GLHLTH 538 PUBPOL 582

Social science perspective on global environmental health. Students will learn to identify primary environmental causes of high burden diseases such as malaria, diarrhea, and respiratory infections; describe how to measure socio-economic impacts of global environmental health diseases; discuss key policies to control global environmental health problems based on private prevention and therapeutic behaviors; and propose frameworks to empirically monitor and evaluate global environmental health policies. A sub-module will focus on climate change and water-borne diseases. Prerequisites: Intro course in statistics.

ENVIRON 538
Was: ENVIRON 238
Pattanayak, Subhrendu UG/GRAD FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
Introductory Demographic Measures and Concepts
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 532S

This is an introductory course in demographic concepts, measures and techniques. The primary objective is to learn how demographers measure population change, mortality, morbidity, fertility, marriage, divorce, and migration. The course also illustrates the broader application of demographic measurement and techniques to other aspects of society and population health, such as educational attainment, labor force participation, linkages between mortality, morbidity and disability, and health and mortality differentials. The understanding of the materials is aided by a series of problem sets which are designed to help students learn to apply demographic methods.

GLHLTH 530S
Was: GLHLTH 250
Merli, Maria-Giovanna UG/GRAD FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Methods
MAJOR: Focused Study
Global Health Policy and Policy Making

Introduction to essential global health policy concepts, understanding of global health policy-making, how policies affect reality on the ground in global health and development. Build critical analytical skills and the ability to translate coursework into broader understanding of policies and policy-making. Includes lectures, analysis, discussion, readings, case studies. Open to juniors, seniors, and Master's students pursuing GH certificate or public policy, MSc in GH, SOM third year. Department consent required.

GLHLTH 570
Was: GLHLTH 222
Miller, Michael UG/GRAD FALL 2012 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Foundations – Policy
Globalization and Governance

Seminar explores economic, political, and social aspects of globalization and their implications for public policy making in the twenty-first century. Focus on issues of governance, particularly international cooperation, the design of international organizations, and the role of international NGOs. Policy areas include international trade and finance, environment, security, human rights, media and communications, and international development.

PUBPOL 820
Was: PUBPOL 320
Johnson, Tana GRAD Only FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
Global Health Research: Design and Practice

Course provides a foundation in study design, research question development, field implementation, measurement, validity and reliability. Quantitative and qualitative research approaches are examined. Students build critical skills in reading, interpreting and synthesizing scientific literature. The selection of appropriate measurements and survey development is emphasized and issues in field implementation explored.

GLHLTH 702
Was: GLHLTH 321
Prudhomme - O'Meara, Wendy Read, Jen'nan GRAD Only FALL 2012 MSC: Core
Biostatistics and Epidemiology for Global Health

Course introduces principles of epidemiology, including disease frequency measures; measures of association; observational, experimental, and quasi-experimental study designs; validity -- confounding, selection bias, measurement error; reliability. Course interweaves introductory biostatistics for continuous and categorical variables. Course has a data analysis lab section in which students walk through a guided data analysis on a provided data set, such as Demographic and Health Surveys.

GLHLTH 705
Was: GLHLTH 320
Pence, Brian GRAD Only FALL 2012 MSC: Core
PhD: Methods
Water, Cooperation, and Conflict
Crosslisted as ENVIRON 543S GLHLTH 533s

Focuses on potential for transboundary water resources-related conflict and cooperation. Discusses water scarcity concepts, natural resource conflict theory, hydro politics, hydro hegemony, water security, water markets and institutions, game theory, and international water law. Other topics include the economics of water and health. Case studies complement the broader course outlook.

PUBPOL 580S
Was: PUBPOL 264S
Jeuland, Marc UG/GRAD FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis

Fundamental aspects of geographic information systems and satellite remote sensing for environmental applications. Covers concepts of geographic data development, cartography, image processing, and spatial analysis. Gateway into more advanced training in geospatial analysis curriculum. Consent of instructor required.

ENVIRON 559/559L
Halpin/Harrell, UG/GRAD FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
Economic Growth and Development Policy

Basic principles and policy issues in the study of economic growth and development. The roles of physical, natural and human capital, technological innovation, productivity improvements and institutions in explaining patterns andncauses of variations in growth and development performance of countries. Effects on growth and development of many current policy issues including HIV-AIDs, financial crises, foreign aid and investment, debt burdens and forgiveness, corruption and governance. Prerequisite: Public Policy Studies 302.

PUBPOL 598
Fernholz, UG/GRAD FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
Microeconomics of International Development Policy

Microeconomic foundations of international development policy using tools of microeconomics to study behavior of individuals, households, and firms in developing countries. Topics may include household and intrahousehold modeling; market participation; agrarian contracts; credit and microfinance; nutrition and health; poverty traps; etc. Public Policy Studies 303D prerequisite or instructor approval.

PUBPOL 630S
Krishna, Anirudh UG/GRAD FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
Monitoring and Evaluation

This course takes a critical look at the range of issues and challenges typical in program M&E, with a strong focus on international development programs or projects. Students will develop or strengthen key program design and management skills for stronger results and demonstrated impact. Hands-on practical assignments will draw on material presented, your own experience, and class discussions to test your ideas and constructively challenge others. Half of the class grade depends on a group or individual project (M&E design and case study).nRequirements: Experience in international development programs, comparable practical exposure to real-world low-resource political economies, or professors approval. Logic or philosophy of science, and social science analytical methods. Instructor consent required.

PUBPOL 728
Elkins, Catherine GRAD Only FALL 2012 MSC: Elective
Microbial Ecology and Evolution

Survey of new advances in the field of environmental and evolutionary microbiology, based on current literature, discussion, and laboratory exercises. Topics to include bacterial phylogeny, molecular ecology, emerging infectious diseases, bacterial symbiosis, experimental evolution, evolution of drug resistance, and microbial genomics. Prerequisite: Biology 25L, 103L, 118, or consent of instructor. Instructor: Vilgalys. 4 units.

BIOLOGY 557L
Was: BIOLOGY 211L
Staff UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 MSC: Elective
Social Change, Markets, and Economy in China

Introduction to recent economic, social, and institutional changes in China, with focus on recent (post 1980) periods. Up-to-date descriptive reviews, empirical data, and discussions on historical background, current status, and future perspectives. Instructor: Yi

ECON 542S
Was: ECON 269S - 05
Yi, Zeng UG/GRAD SPRING 2012
Current Issues in International and Development Economics

Issues of income distribution within and between countries, vehicles for growth, regional development, the role of politics in economic policy, multinational institutions. Cross-country and cross-time comparisons. Emphasis on individual research projects. Prerequisite: Economics 105D; and Economics 110D. Instructor: Tower

ECON 568S
Was: ECON 268S - 01
Tower, Edward UG/GRAD SPRING 2012
Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment

Topics central to both health and ecological risk assessment are explored. Basic concepts of hazard identification, dose response relationships, exposure assessment, and risk characterization and
communication are discussed in the context of both human health and environmental assessment. The basis and rationale for using specific, as well as extrapolated, scientific information and expert judgment, and the strengths and weaknesses of alternative approaches, are evaluated. Applications emphasizing real cases are used to illustrate the interdisciplinary process and products of risk assessment, as well as the regulatory use of the information. Group projects emphasized. Instructors: Mihaich and McMasters. 3 units

Course Notes
Counts as Methods for students matriculating in or before fall 2009.
ENVIRON 539
Was: ENVIRON 239
Staff UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 GHC: Methods
MINOR: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
Resource Environmental Policy/environmental Politics
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 577

Environmental policy
formation and implementation in comparative perspective. Topics include interest groups, environmental movements
and parties, public opinion, political systems and institutions. Case students selected from the United States and other advanced industrialized countries and the developing world. Spring.

ENVIRON 577
Was: ENVIRON 274
Albright, Elizabeth UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Cost-Benefit Analysis for Health & Environmental Policy
Crosslisted as PUBPOL 607 GLHLTH 531
ENVIRON 563
Was: ENVIRON 263
Jeuland, Marc UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
MSC: Elective
MSC: Methods
Global Mental Health GLHLTH 660
Was: GLHLTH 223S
Maselko, Joanna UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 MSC: Elective
PhD: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Global Health Capstone

Capstone Course for students in Global Health Certificate and the Global Health Major. Group analysis of a current global health problem/issue. Project involves background research, data acquisition, analysis, writing, and presentation of a substantial research paper/report at an advanced level. Consent of instructor required.

Course Notes
Course number was GLHLTH 255S prior to spring 2010. Course is no longer offered as a seminar.
GLHLTH 501
Was: GLHLTH 255
Boyd, David Clements, Dennis UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 MAJOR: Senior Seminar
Ethics For Global Health Research

This course will present an overview of practical and theoretical approaches to bioethics from a range of perspectives, including the humanities, law, philosophy, medicine and science. Students will apply various resources, terminology and frameworks to case studies which will prepare them for their own research. The course will include IRB and responsible conduct of research. (2 credits)

GLHLTH 740
Was: GLHLTH 330
McKinney, Ross Hawkins, Jennifer Sreenivasan, Gopal GRAD Only SPRING 2012 MSC: Core
PhD: Elective
Health Systems in Developing Countries

This course introduces students to key challenges faced in strengthening of health systems in low and middle income countries. The course will cover a diverse set of topics including an overview of organization of health systems, models of purchasing and providing health care, innovations in financing health care, and issues in service delivery such as quality of care and human resource challenges. Students will learn frameworks and methods employed in the evaluation of health systems. The course will also draw attention to resource allocation problems and various frameworks used to address them. The course will primarily rely on readings from a variety of health policy, economics and other social science journals.

GLHLTH 750
Was: GLHLTH 340
Mohanan, Manoj GRAD Only SPRING 2012 MSC: Core
PhD: Elective
Ungraded Research in Global Health

Individual research in a field of special interest, the central goal of which is a substantive paper containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Consent required.

GLHLTH 781
Was: GLHLTH 381
Woods, Chris GRAD Only SPRING 2012 MSC: Thesis
Virology and Viral Oncology MGM 552
Was: MGM 252
Cullen, Bryan UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Microbial Pathogenesis

Modern molecular genetic approaches to understanding the pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Underlying mechanisms of pathogenesis and host-parasite relationships that contribute to the infectious disease process.

MGM 582
Was: MGM 282
McCusker, John UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Provides the student the opportunity to incorporate health promotion and disease prevention assessment and intervention into the health of clients across the life span. Applying the principles of health education, the course prepares students to use the tools and skills necessary to provide health promotion and disease
prevention services to individuals, families, groups, and communities. The definition of health and the factors that impact an individual's or group's health framework is the basis for understanding health maintenance interventions. 3 credits.

NURSING 502
Was: NURSING 502
Reiner, Isaac Lipkus UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 MSC: Elective
Designing Innovation for Global Health

In this age of globalization, the expectations of life-saving technologies cross borders readily, but the introduction and adaptation of these technologies in resource-limited settings often lag behind. While we often think of technologies such as AIDS drugs, there are many appropriate technologies that are potentially transformative for improving local health--making water potable, cookstoves more efficient and less polluting, and diagnostics more available in local clinics. Behind each of these technologies, there are innovators, sometimes publicly funded researchers, other times private companies, often social entrepreneurs. In this course, students will critically examine the policy and philanthropic landscape behind these areas of appropriate technology. Beyond the engineering of these technologies, what is the social engineering of policies that minimize inequity? For example, is potable water best tackled with an innovation that serves the needs of an individual (e.g., Life Straw), a group (e.g., solar disinfectant system), or an entire community (e.g., chlorination of a local reservoir). Through the lens of these technologies, students will consider what factors help enable local innovation, from intellectual and financial capital to end-user input and systems for sharing and owning knowledge. What forms of philanthropy—from microcredit and giving circles to donor aid—work best to foster local innovation and to build local capacity? What are the ethical issues involved in introducing technologies, from double standards in quality to donor-recipient relationships? This course seeks to prepare those engaged in such work to consider the policy ramifications of designing innovation for global health.

PUBPOL 642S
Was: PUBPOL 213
So, Anthony UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Responsible Genomics

Survey of ethical, social, economic, and legal issues in genomics. Introduction to ethical reasoning and examination of selected issues calling for such analysis, including: special procedures for research involving human participants, (2) respect for privacy and confidentiality of genetic information; (3) historical and political background of health research funding, and (4) public-private research interactions such as intellectual property and conflict of interest. Instructor: Cook-Deegan. 3 units. (Also counts as a policy elective.)

PUBPOL 634
Was: PUBPOL 240
Cook-Deegan, Robert UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 MSC: Elective
Innovation and Policy Entrepreneurship

This course will analyze a sampling of innovative policies and programs that were initiated to solve major problems in developed and developing countries. Some of the approaches worked; some did not. All of them, however, challenged conventional thinking, hence the title of the course ‘innovative policies’. During the semester we will discuss the following issues: crisis, innovation and policy space, leadership, transformation and transitions, innovation from within and from without, sectoral opportunity, unintended consequences, and the dynamics of decision making for innovative policies. Among the examples we will discuss are the Marshall Plan in Europe, the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, Thailand’s approach to Family Planning, and the start of major civic volunteerism in the United States. The course will use the case approach. Each week, we will discuss a policy or set of policies. Students enrolled in the course will be asked to join a group (2-3) to discuss, analyze and present the cases. They are expected to develop a case and present it. We will also have films that highlight some aspect of a case.

PUBPOL 726
Was: PUBPOL 383G.01
Fernholz, GRAD Only SPRING 2012 MSC: Elective
Indigenous Peoples, Human Rights & Development

This seminar focuses on indigenous peoples, their basic rights, and their roles in national and international development processes. Through class discussions, case studies and role-playing, students will examine the impact of national policies and global trends on indigenous populations and vice versa, and the dynamics of conflict generation and resolution. Among the issues to be discussed are notions of sovereignty and governance, land and other property rights, community management of natural resources, indigenous social movements, international networks and assistance, culture, access and survival.

PUBPOL 790
Was: PUBPOL 388.07
Fernholz, Rosemary GRAD Only SPRING 2012
Global Nutrition: Over and Under Nutrition in Developing Countries

Discusses the nutrition problems of developing countries. Reviews epidemiological, biological, and behavioral consequences of both overnutrition (e.g., obesity) and undernutrition (e.g., malnutrition). Emphasizes infectious disease (HIV, TB, malaria, diarrhea) of children and perinatal outcomes (e.g., fetal loss, low birth weight, HIV transmission, pre-eclampsia) of women and children. Strong focus on ethical and political issues relevant to the formulation of nutrition policy and programs in developing countries. Course is designed for graduate students or advanced undergraduates.

GLHLTH 670S
Was: GLHLTH 220S - 01
Benjamin Neelon, Sara UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Elective
Population and Environmental Dynamics and Human Health

Course examines population, health and environment (PHE) dynamics with focus on interactions in developing or transition economies. Theoretical and empirical approaches governing PHE dynamics from multidisciplinary perspectives, including geography, public health/epidemiology, demography, and economics. Students will obtain experience in design and analysis of PHE studies, and epidemiology of vector-born, chronic and enteric infections.

GLHLTH 637
Was: GLHLTH 237S
Pan, William UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 MSC: Elective
PhD: Elective
MSC: Methods
Implementation Research and Health

Implementation Research/Operational Research (IR/OR) studies how to improve uptake, implementation, and translation of research findings into routine and common practices ('know-do' or 'evidence to program' gap); moves results from effectiveness studies and efficacy trials to real-world settings, obtaining information to guide scale-up; helps implementers apply lessons from a program in one context to developing a similar program in a similar environment. Course covers: framework of IR/OR; methods of identifying program implementation problems; how to organize and develop an IR/OR proposal; main study design, research methods, data collection and analysis used in IR/OR; approaches to capacity building for IR/OR in developing countries.

GLHLTH 751
Was: GLHLTH 350
Tang, Shenglan GRAD Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
PhD: Methods
PhD: Elective
Special Topics Environmental Health

Topics Vary: Special Topics in Environmentn Environmental effects on human health with a particular focus on the chronic effects of exposure to pollution and other stressors, and the interaction of anthropogenic environmental changes with infectious diseases. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Prerequisites: Introductory biology and chemistry, or consent of instructor.

ENVIRON 590
Was: ENVIRON 298
Meyer, Joel UG/GRAD SPRING 2012 GHC: Elective
MSC: Elective
MAJOR: Focused Study
MINOR: Elective
Politics of International Aid in Low-Income Countries

The effectiveness of aid in low-income countries has been the subject of intense debate.The course will examine the context and objectives of international aid, the record and lessons, and recent efforts and proposals for change within the international community. There is a special (but not exclusive) focus on Africa, since more robust growth and poverty reduction on that continent are at the center of the aidneffectiveness debate. In this exploration of the politics of aid, attention will be focused on the principal stakeholders, their motivations, and the quality of interaction among the various players (Governments, NGOs, bilateral donors, and multilateral institutions), along with the bottom line whether aid is resulting in poverty reduction in low income countries. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with recent literature on the topic, key debates surrounding aid effectiveness, the policies and actions of different donors, and recent proposals and measures aimed at improving development assistance. The course is primarily a group discussion, with occasional mini-lectures, student presentations, debates, case studies, two papers, and a final simulation.

PUBPOL 724
Was: PUBPOL 383E.01
Pomerantz, Phyllis GRAD Only SPRING 2012 MSC: Elective
Culture, Policy & Action

Starting with the premise that ‘culture matters’, the course covers the impacts of values and attitudes, historical differences, religion, ethnicity, language, and regional identities to shape public policy, action and debate. It draws insights from various disciplines such as history, anthropology, sociology, economics, natural sciences, politics and religion. During the semester, we discuss approaches to value cultural diversity, culture relevant dilemmas in development, policy making by various actors in divided societies, and the cost of culture related difficulties.
Students enrolled in the course are expected to participate actively through class discussions/debates and presentations. There will be group presentations (2-3 persons to a group) made on selected themes during the course. A major paper on the topic presented is also required.

PUBPOL 790
Was: PUBPOL 388.08
Fernholz, Rosemary GRAD Only SPRING 2012 MSC: Elective
Advanced Demographic Methods

Mathematical methods and computer software for the analysis of population dynamics. Life table and stationary population theory; methods of life table estimation; multiple-decrement and multistate life tables; stationary population theory and its extensions; model life tables and stationary populations; two-sex models and interacting populations; hazard regression models, grade-of-membership analysis, and cohort studies.

SOCIOL 726S
Was: SOCIOL 216S
Land, Kenneth GRAD Only SPRING 2012 GHC: Methods
MSC: Elective