Global Health PLUS

Placement of Life-Changing Usable Surplus (GH PLUS) Program

Each year, tens of thousands of dollars of medical equipment and supplies within Duke University Health System (DUHS) are designated as "surplus." Surplus equipment includes items set aside because they are being replaced by newer equipment. This equipment can change lives in low-resource settings.

Our mission is to support overseas Duke programs by making surplus medical equipment from DUHS available to partner institutions and health care professionals around the world.

Duke Global Health PLUS is administered through the Duke Global Health Institute. Duke faculty or Duke-affiliated physicians can apply for equipment to support overseas projects in developing countries. GH PLUS projects must be formally connected to Duke, sponsored by a Duke faculty member and endorsed by the faculty’s department or school.

Request Equipment

APPLY NOW

  • Complete one application per project and send electronically to duke-ghplus@duke.edu
  • An acknowledgement of receipt of your application will be sent within a week.
  • The GH PLUS program reviewers will only review complete applications of projects that fulfill the program’s eligibility criteria.

Request Supplies Through REMEDY at Duke

If you are interested in medical supplies, please visit REMEDY at Duke for more information. REMEDY at Duke is a volunteer-run program within the Duke University Health System organized to recover usable surplus medical supplies and distribute them via Duke-affiliated and other nonprofit global health projects to areas of need.

Questions?

For more information about the Duke Global Health PLUS program, please email questions to duke-ghplus@duke.edu.

 

We’re grateful to Duke Global Health PLUS for supporting our Biomedical Equipment Technicians training program in Honduras.

Robert Malkin — Pratt and DGHI faculty member

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