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Faculty

Kevin Schulman

Professor, Medicine, Business Administration and Global Health
School of Medicine
Medicine

(919) 668-8101
kevin.schulman@duke.edu

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Kevin Schulman

Summary

Kevin A. Schulman, MD, is a professor of medicine in the Duke University School of Medicine, where he also serves as the director of the Center for Clinical and Genetic Economics and as an associate director of the Duke Clinical Research Institute. He is a professor of business administration in Duke University's Fuqua School of Business, and also holds appointments in the Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care in the Durham VA Medical Center, the Duke Center for Clinical Health Policy Research, and the Trent Center for Bioethics, Humanities and History of Medicine.

His research interests include economic evaluation in clinical research; health services research and policy, including access to care and the impact of reimbursement and regulatory policies on clinical practice; and medical decision making, especially in patients with life-threatening conditions.

Dr. Schulman received his MD degree from the New York University School of Medicine and a master's degree in business administration from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He completed a residency in internal medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He is a board-certified physician in internal medicine.

Dr. Schulman is an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation, a recipient of the Alice S. Hersh Young Investigator Award from the Association for Health Services Research (now AcademyHealth), and the inaugural recipient of the Dr. Herbert W. Nickens Epidemiology Award from the Association of Black Cardiologists. He has written extensively on his research topics, including peer-reviewed articles in the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and Annals of Internal Medicine. He is currently a member of the editorial/advisory boards of five journals, including The American Journal of Medicine, the American Heart Journal, Health Services Research, and Value in Health.

Teaching

Title Number Level Semester Requirements Fulfilled
Health Systems in Developing Countries

This course introduces students to key challenges faced in strengthening of health systems in low and middle income countries. The course will cover a diverse set of topics including an overview of organization of health systems, models of purchasing and providing health care, innovations in financing health care, and issues in service delivery such as quality of care and human resource challenges. Students will learn frameworks and methods employed in the evaluation of health systems. The course will also draw attention to resource allocation problems and various frameworks used to address them. The course will primarily rely on readings from a variety of health policy, economics and other social science journals. Course introduces key challenges faced in strengthening of health systems in low and middle income countries. Topics include: overview of organization of health systems, models of purchasing and providing health care, innovations in financing health care, issues in service delivery such as quality of care and human resource challenges, and frameworks and methods employed in the evaluation of health systems. Course will also draw attention to resource allocation problems and various frameworks used to address them. Readings primarily from health policy, economics and other social science journals. Consent of instructor required.

Course Notes:
GLHLTH 750
Was: GLHLTH 340
GRAD Only SPRING 2015 MSC: Core
PhD: Elective

Recent Publications

Reed SD, Li Y, Kamble S, et al. Introduction of the TEAM-HF costing tool: a user-friendly spreadsheet program to estimate costs of providing patient-centered interventions. Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes;5(1):113-119.

Greiner MA, Hammill BG, Fonarow GC, et al. Predicting high costs among Medicare beneficiaries with heart failure. Am J Cardiol;109(5):705-711.

Glickman SW, Galhenage S, McNair L, et al. The potential influence of Internet-based social networking on the conduct of clinical research studies. J Empir Res Hum Res Ethics;7(1):71-80.

Dinan MA, Robinson TJ, Zagar TM, et al. Changes in initial treatment for prostate cancer among Medicare beneficiaries, 1999-2007. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys;82(5):e781-e786.

DeWitt EM, Grussemeyer CA, Friedman JY, Dinan MA, Schulman KA, Reed SD. Resource use, costs, and utility estimates for patients with cystic fibrosis with mild impairment in lung function: analysis of data collected alongside a 48-week multicenter clinical trial. Value Health;15(2):277-283.

Baras AI, Baras AS, Schulman KA. Drug development risk and the cost of capital. Nat Rev Drug Discov;11(5):347-348.

Curtis LH, Hammill BG, Qualls LG, et al. Treatment patterns for neovascular age-related macular degeneration: analysis of 284 380 Medicare beneficiaries. Am J Ophthalmol;153(6):1116-1124.e1.

Dinan MA, Curtis LH, Carpenter WR, et al. Stage migration, selection bias, and survival associated with the adoption of positron emission tomography among Medicare beneficiaries with non-small-cell lung cancer, 1998-2003. J Clin Oncol;30(22):2725-2730.

Kamble S, Schulman KA, Reed SD. Cost-effectiveness of sensor-augmented pump therapy in adults with type 1 diabetes in the United States. Value Health;15(5):632-638.

Gellad ZF, Muir AJ, McHutchison JG, et al. Cost-effectiveness of truncated therapy for hepatitis C based on rapid virologic response. Value Health;15(6):876-886.

Reed SD, Li Y, Ellis SJ, et al. Associations between hemoglobin level, resource use, and medical costs in patients with heart failure: findings from HF-ACTION. J Card Fail;18(10):784-791.

Reed SD, Li Y, Dunlap ME, et al. In-hospital resource use and medical costs in the last year of life by mode of death (from the HF-ACTION randomized controlled trial). Am J Cardiol;110(8):1150-1155.

Valverde AM, Reed SD, Schulman KA. Proposed 'grant-and-access' program with price caps could stimulate development of drugs for very rare diseases. Health Aff (Millwood);31(11):2528-2535.