News

MSc-GH Dinner

DGHI Welcomes Dozens of New Global Health Students and Scholars

August 25, 2015

As returning global health students and scholars wrap up their fieldwork in nearly 30 different countries, DGHI is welcoming a new class of 33 master’s degree students, three new doctoral scholars and dozens of new undergraduate majors and minors.

Duke PKU Course Participants

Duke-Peking University Global Health Course Held at DKU for First Time

August 25, 2015

For the seventh year in a row, junior faculty and post-graduates working at the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, health care and health management organizations, and other organizations involved in global health in China gathered as students in the two-week Duke-Peking University Global Health Certificate program in June.

Sulzhan Bali and several Nigerian collaborators

Student Spotlight: Sulzhan Bali, MSc-GH Candidate, Seeks Collaborative Solutions

August 25, 2015

Sulzhan Bali took a unique route to the Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI). A Master of Science in Global Health student, Bali has already earned a master’s in virology and a PhD in molecular biology. But her scientific experience resulted in a realization that many of the challenges that face health care today are not simply scientific problems, but rather may be logistical or business problems that require more collaborative and interdisciplinary solutions.

Traveling with Mother and Sick Infant

Duke Study in Peru Yields Unexpected Discoveries

August 18, 2015

Most of the time in the global health research field, a long time has to pass before we see any tangible outcomes in people’s daily lives and health. Years can easily go by between the start of a research project, the fieldwork, the sampling, processing of samples, analyzing the data, writing and publishing until you see the real public health payoff. But tucked between the high Andean mountains of Cusco and the Southern tropical Peruvian Amazon, Duke researchers have been making positive impacts beyond the scope of their scientific endeavors.

DGHI Awards Grants for Global Maternal, Adolescent and Child Health Projects

August 18, 2015

The Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI) has awarded grants for two research projects focused on maternal, adolescent and child health (MACH). One of DGHI’s research priorities, MACH is an emerging field that seeks to reduce mortality and morbidity for preventable and treatable causes. Through these pilot grants, DGHI is looking to provide funds to stimulate interdisciplinary research in maternal, adolescent and child health, with the larger goal of enabling investigators to leverage preliminary findings and data to obtain larger awards of external funding.

Christina_Meade

DGHI Professor Receives NIDA Award to Study Decision Making and HIV Risk

August 11, 2015

According to psychiatry and global health professor Christina Meade, current HIV prevention interventions have had limited results in reducing sexual risk behaviors among drug users. Through research funded by her new $2.4 million Avenir Award, granted by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), Meade hopes to change this.

Obstetric_Fistula_Research_Team

Key DGHI Collaboration Partners Assume Leadership Roles in Moshi, Tanzania

August 11, 2015

Four of the Duke Global Health Institute’s (DGHI’s) longtime collaboration partners in Moshi, Tanzania, have been selected for leadership positions at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC), Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College (KCMUC) and the Kilimanjaro Clinical Research Institute.

Research_Roundup

DGHI Research Roundup: July 2015

August 11, 2015

Eleven DGHI faculty members, staff and affiliates recently shared new discoveries on a variety of global health topics in peer-reviewed publications.

Doris_Duke_Fellows

DGHI Welcomes Three New Doris Duke Fellows

July 28, 2015

DGHI has selected three new Doris Duke International Clinical Research Fellows for the 2015-16 academic year. The fellows—medical students from Duke University, Northwestern University and the University of Virginia—will spend the next eight to nine months conducting clinical global health research.

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